futuramb:


The networked car is no longer just an idea; it will be mandated in future vehicles
For the last two years, automakers and the U.S. Department of Transportation have been investigating the idea of cars talking to once another, putting thousands of Wi-Fi connected smart vehicles on a track in at the University of Michigan to see if they could cooperate with another and avoid accidents. Apparently the feds are convinced that the technology is ready for prime-time because on Monday, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said it is kicking off a process that will one day make inter-networking a requirement in all new vehicles.

(via The networked car is no longer just an idea; it will be mandated in future vehicles — Tech News and Analysis)

futuramb:

The networked car is no longer just an idea; it will be mandated in future vehicles

For the last two years, automakers and the U.S. Department of Transportation have been investigating the idea of cars talking to once another, putting thousands of Wi-Fi connected smart vehicles on a track in at the University of Michigan to see if they could cooperate with another and avoid accidents. Apparently the feds are convinced that the technology is ready for prime-time because on Monday, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said it is kicking off a process that will one day make inter-networking a requirement in all new vehicles.

(via The networked car is no longer just an idea; it will be mandated in future vehicles — Tech News and Analysis)

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Watson at your service
“One moment, please.” “We’ll be with you shortly.” “You are eighth in the queue.” Sound all too familiar? Maybe not for long—The Watson Engagement Advisor can listen to customer queries, suggest personalized follow up questions and help operators find answers in a flash. For even faster service, callers can interact directly with Watson itself. Could this also mean an end to the need for mind-numbing “hold music?” (One can only hope.)

ibmblr:

Watson at your service

“One moment, please.” “We’ll be with you shortly.” “You are eighth in the queue.” Sound all too familiar? Maybe not for long—The Watson Engagement Advisor can listen to customer queries, suggest personalized follow up questions and help operators find answers in a flash. For even faster service, callers can interact directly with Watson itself. Could this also mean an end to the need for mind-numbing “hold music?” (One can only hope.)

Oculus Is Awesome for Games, But It’s the Future of Movies

"I never thought I’d ever say this, but I’m onstage with Beck. He’s wearing his usual hat-and-blazer combo, and covering one of my favorite David Bowie songs. Out past the crowd is a full choir — a few faces I recognize because they played with Beck during last year’s Station to Station rolling art extravaganza — and a massive musical ensemble. People are cheering and taking photos. It’s incredible. Then I look down. Instead of seeing knees or feet, I see Beck’s Chelsea boots.
That’s when my brain reminds me I’m not actually on stage.
Instead, I’m sitting in a chair at the Sundance Film Festival’s New Frontier installation, wearing an Oculus Rift virtual reality headset. I’m watching  a retooled version of the 360-degree interactive video of Beck’s live performance of “Sound and Vision” that he and Chris Milk made for Lincoln last year. My I’m-a-rockstar dream is shattered, but it’s possible that this might actually be cooler than performing with a folk hero — I get to have all the fun of performing without worrying about singing off-key or being incapacitated by stage fright.

Full Story: Wired

Oculus Is Awesome for Games, But It’s the Future of Movies

"I never thought I’d ever say this, but I’m onstage with Beck. He’s wearing his usual hat-and-blazer combo, and covering one of my favorite David Bowie songs. Out past the crowd is a full choir — a few faces I recognize because they played with Beck during last year’s Station to Station rolling art extravaganza — and a massive musical ensemble. People are cheering and taking photos. It’s incredible. Then I look down. Instead of seeing knees or feet, I see Beck’s Chelsea boots.

That’s when my brain reminds me I’m not actually on stage.

Instead, I’m sitting in a chair at the Sundance Film Festival’s New Frontier installation, wearing an Oculus Rift virtual reality headset. I’m watching  a retooled version of the 360-degree interactive video of Beck’s live performance of “Sound and Vision” that he and Chris Milk made for Lincoln last year. My I’m-a-rockstar dream is shattered, but it’s possible that this might actually be cooler than performing with a folk hero — I get to have all the fun of performing without worrying about singing off-key or being incapacitated by stage fright.

Full Story: Wired

Getting food from the farm to our fork eats up 10% of the total U.S. energy budget, uses 50% of U.S. land, and swallows 80% of all freshwater consumed in the United States. Yet, 40% of food in the United States today goes uneaten. This not only means that Americans are throwing out the equivalent of $165 billion each year, but also that the uneaten food ends up rotting in landfills as the single largest component of U.S. municipal solid waste where it accounts for a large portion of U.S. methane emissions.

ibmsocialbiz:

Social-mobile-analytics focus at a premier Asian bank
Singapore’s DBS Bank is the largest bank in Southeast Asia, with $401 billion (Singapore) in assets. It is the dominant retail bank in Singapore, and also has a growing presence in China and South Asia. The bank is using technologies like mobile, social media and analytics to remake its relationship with customers and its operations.
(via DBS Bank Pumps Up the Volume on its Technology | MIT Sloan Management Review)

ibmsocialbiz:

Social-mobile-analytics focus at a premier Asian bank

Singapore’s DBS Bank is the largest bank in Southeast Asia, with $401 billion (Singapore) in assets. It is the dominant retail bank in Singapore, and also has a growing presence in China and South Asia. The bank is using technologies like mobile, social media and analytics to remake its relationship with customers and its operations.

(via DBS Bank Pumps Up the Volume on its Technology | MIT Sloan Management Review)

It used to all make sense. The web was once nothing but documents. Just like you’d want some type of file browser UI to dig through files on your operating system, obviously, you need some type of document browser to view all these web-addressable “documents”. But over time, those “documents” have become a lot more. A. lot. more. But I can now use one of these “documents” to have a 4 person video/audio conference on Talky with people anywhere in the world, play incredible full-screen first-person shooters at 60fps, write code in a full-fledged editor, or {{ the reader may insert any number of amazing web apps here }} using nothing but this “document viewer”. Does calling them “documents” seem ridiculous to anyone else? Of course it does. Calling them “sites” is pretty silly too, actually because a “site” implies a document with links and a URL.

Online shoe retailer Zappos is experiencing a surge sales from customers using Android-based smartphones. 
Recognizing the importance of designing platform-specific experiences for its native apps, the company devotes a separate team for iOS and Android. Each team consists of fans of that specific device and their expertise leads to more appropriate executions. Examples of Android-specific features:
 a widget that tracks a shipment on your home screen without having to open up the app, log-in and find the item.
 a smartphone screensaver that displays the time and weather on top of a Zappos product matched to the current weather.
(via Zappos sees Android conversions on the rise with catered UI - Mobile Commerce Daily - Strategy)

Online shoe retailer Zappos is experiencing a surge sales from customers using Android-based smartphones. 

Recognizing the importance of designing platform-specific experiences for its native apps, the company devotes a separate team for iOS and Android. Each team consists of fans of that specific device and their expertise leads to more appropriate executions. Examples of Android-specific features:

  •  a widget that tracks a shipment on your home screen without having to open up the app, log-in and find the item.
  •  a smartphone screensaver that displays the time and weather on top of a Zappos product matched to the current weather.

(via Zappos sees Android conversions on the rise with catered UI - Mobile Commerce Daily - Strategy)

(via ibmsocialbiz)