New algorithm could substantially speed up MRI scans | Medical Xpress
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices can scan the  inside of  the body in intricate detail, allowing clinicians to spot even the   earliest signs of cancer or other abnormalities. But they can be a long  and  uncomfortable experience for patients, requiring them to lie still  in the  machine for up to 45 minutes.
Now this scan time could be cut to just 15 minutes,  thanks to an  algorithm developed at MIT’s Research Laboratory of Electronics.
MRI scanners use strong magnetic fields and radio  waves to produce  images of the body. Rather than taking just one scan of a  patient, the  machines typically acquire a variety of images of the same body  part,  each designed to create a contrast between different types of tissue. By   comparing multiple images of the same region, and studying how the  contrasts  vary across the different tissue types, radiologists can  detect subtle  abnormalities such as a developing tumor.  But taking  multiple scans of the same region in this way is time-consuming,   meaning patients must spend long periods inside the machine

New algorithm could substantially speed up MRI scans | Medical Xpress

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices can scan the inside of the body in intricate detail, allowing clinicians to spot even the earliest signs of cancer or other abnormalities. But they can be a long and uncomfortable experience for patients, requiring them to lie still in the machine for up to 45 minutes.

Now this scan time could be cut to just 15 minutes, thanks to an algorithm developed at MIT’s Research Laboratory of Electronics.

MRI scanners use strong magnetic fields and radio waves to produce images of the body. Rather than taking just one scan of a patient, the machines typically acquire a variety of images of the same body part, each designed to create a contrast between different types of tissue. By comparing multiple images of the same region, and studying how the contrasts vary across the different tissue types, radiologists can detect subtle abnormalities such as a developing tumor. But taking multiple scans of the same region in this way is time-consuming, meaning patients must spend long periods inside the machine

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