Hologram-like 3-D brain helps researchers decode migraine pain
Wielding a joystick and wearing special glasses, pain researcher Alexandre DaSilva rotates and slices apart a large, colorful, 3-D brain floating in space before him.
Despite the white lab coat, it appears DaSilva’s playing the world’s most advanced virtual video game. The University of Michigan dentistry professor is actually hoping to better understand how our brains make their own pain-killing chemicals during a migraine attack.
The 3-D brain is a novel way to examine data from images taken during a patient’s actual migraine attack, says DaSilva, who heads the Headache and Orofacial Pain Effort at the U-M School of Dentistry and the Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience Institute.
Different colors in the 3-D brain give clues about chemical processes happening during a patient’s migraine attack using a PET scan, or positron emission tomography, a type of medical imaging.
“This high level of immersion (in 3-D) effectively places our investigators inside the actual patient’s brain image,” DaSilva said.
The 3-D research occurs in the U-M 3-D Lab, part of the U-M Library.
via: neurosciencestuff

Hologram-like 3-D brain helps researchers decode migraine pain

Wielding a joystick and wearing special glasses, pain researcher Alexandre DaSilva rotates and slices apart a large, colorful, 3-D brain floating in space before him.

Despite the white lab coat, it appears DaSilva’s playing the world’s most advanced virtual video game. The University of Michigan dentistry professor is actually hoping to better understand how our brains make their own pain-killing chemicals during a migraine attack.

The 3-D brain is a novel way to examine data from images taken during a patient’s actual migraine attack, says DaSilva, who heads the Headache and Orofacial Pain Effort at the U-M School of Dentistry and the Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience Institute.

Different colors in the 3-D brain give clues about chemical processes happening during a patient’s migraine attack using a PET scan, or positron emission tomography, a type of medical imaging.

“This high level of immersion (in 3-D) effectively places our investigators inside the actual patient’s brain image,” DaSilva said.

The 3-D research occurs in the U-M 3-D Lab, part of the U-M Library.

via: neurosciencestuff

(via designersofthings)

A 3D PRINTED SPACESHIP ON THE SCALE OF A HUMAN HAIR? HELLO NANOSCRIBE 3D PRINTER
-
3D printing has become one of the most exciting and talked about technologies of 2013. The ability for the masses to make almost any object not only fuels imagination but challenges modern consumerism and its supply chain. While some enthusiasts continue to showcase the technology by producing toys, cars, and even guns in their garage, others look to 3D printing to manufacture the next generation of electronics, whether for mobile applications, medical devices, or wearable computing.
Regardless of the application, the challenge in manufacturing at the submicron scale is fabricating structures in a precise, rapid, and consistent fashion. Even though 3D printing is just getting started, the race for the fastest, most capable printer is already on.
Last year, a group of researchers at the Vienna University of Technology in Austria refined a 3D printing technique that allowed the construction of sophisticated structures (an F1 racecar and a cathedral) smaller than dust mites in about 4 minutes. Now, a company called Nanoscribe GmbH that emerged from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Germany has made a 3D printer called the Photonic Professional GT which can produce detailed structures on a similar scale but faster.
In fact, the technique was able to produce a spaceship (from the Wing Commander line of video games) from a CAD file that measures 125µm x 81µm x 26.8µm (on the order of the width of a human hair) in less than 50 seconds. (via A 3D Printed Spaceship On The Scale Of A Human Hair? Hello Nanoscribe 3D Printer | Singularity Hub)

A 3D PRINTED SPACESHIP ON THE SCALE OF A HUMAN HAIR? HELLO NANOSCRIBE 3D PRINTER

-

3D printing has become one of the most exciting and talked about technologies of 2013. The ability for the masses to make almost any object not only fuels imagination but challenges modern consumerism and its supply chain. While some enthusiasts continue to showcase the technology by producing toys, cars, and even guns in their garage, others look to 3D printing to manufacture the next generation of electronics, whether for mobile applications, medical devices, or wearable computing.

Regardless of the application, the challenge in manufacturing at the submicron scale is fabricating structures in a precise, rapid, and consistent fashion. Even though 3D printing is just getting started, the race for the fastest, most capable printer is already on.

Last year, a group of researchers at the Vienna University of Technology in Austria refined a 3D printing technique that allowed the construction of sophisticated structures (an F1 racecar and a cathedral) smaller than dust mites in about 4 minutes. Now, a company called Nanoscribe GmbH that emerged from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Germany has made a 3D printer called the Photonic Professional GT which can produce detailed structures on a similar scale but faster.

In fact, the technique was able to produce a spaceship (from the Wing Commander line of video games) from a CAD file that measures 125µm x 81µm x 26.8µm (on the order of the width of a human hair) in less than 50 seconds. (via A 3D Printed Spaceship On The Scale Of A Human Hair? Hello Nanoscribe 3D Printer | Singularity Hub)

(via republicofideas)

MakerBot unveils ‘Digitizer’ 3D scanner (Wired UK)
At the SxSW conference in Austin, Texas, 3D printer manufacturer MakerBot  has announced a 3D scanner called the “Digitizer”.
The desktop-sized device uses cameras and lasers to scan objects and create digital files that can then be used to replicate the object exactly using one of MakerBot’s digital printers.
MakerBot founder Bre Pettis said: “The MakerBot Digitizer is an innovative new way to take a physical object, scan it, and create a digital file — without any design, CAD software or 3D modelling experience at all — and then print the item again and again on a MakerBot Replicator 2 or 2X Desktop 3D Printer.”

MakerBot unveils ‘Digitizer’ 3D scanner (Wired UK)

At the SxSW conference in Austin, Texas, 3D printer manufacturer MakerBot has announced a 3D scanner called the “Digitizer”.

The desktop-sized device uses cameras and lasers to scan objects and create digital files that can then be used to replicate the object exactly using one of MakerBot’s digital printers.

MakerBot founder Bre Pettis said: “The MakerBot Digitizer is an innovative new way to take a physical object, scan it, and create a digital file — without any design, CAD software or 3D modelling experience at all — and then print the item again and again on a MakerBot Replicator 2 or 2X Desktop 3D Printer.”

Taking transistors into a new dimension
A new breakthrough could push the limits of the miniaturization of electronic components further than previously thought possible. A team at the Laboratoire d’Analyse et d’Architecture des Systèmes (LAAS) and Institut d’Électronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN) has built a nanometric transistor that displays exceptional properties for a device of its size. To achieve this result, the researchers developed a novel three-dimensional architecture consisting of a vertical nanowire array whose conductivity is controlled by a gate measuring only 14 nm in length. Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-03-transistors-dimension.html#jCp

Taking transistors into a new dimension

A new breakthrough could push the limits of the miniaturization of electronic components further than previously thought possible. A team at the Laboratoire d’Analyse et d’Architecture des Systèmes (LAAS) and Institut d’Électronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN) has built a nanometric transistor that displays exceptional properties for a device of its size. To achieve this result, the researchers developed a novel three-dimensional architecture consisting of a vertical nanowire array whose conductivity is controlled by a gate measuring only 14 nm in length.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-03-transistors-dimension.html#jCp

Visit the GBS Virtual Center  for the 2012 CEO Study 3D Experience

To socialize and share Leading Through Connections, the 2012 IBM Global CEO Study, we’ve converted our newly upgraded Virtual Center into a realtime environment where you can experience some of the findings from this seminal study via “web walls” and internet-integrated content.

You can also interact with IBMers and other visitors in realtime 3D, complete with built-in 3D voice. new features including webcam sharing and support for Macs.

So stop by anytime and connect with IBMers and experience the 2012 CEO Study in this exciting new way. After a brief one-time setup of the environment’s plugin, you can come in, customize your avatar and take a tour of the virtual space.

8bitfuture:

Startup company MatterPort has shown off their 3D scanner, able to rapidly create maps of rooms by scanning the device around the space.
While the scanner is still under development, the company won’t say how much it will go on sale for except it will be “18 times cheaper” than competing devices (which typically retail for $30,000 to $50,000).
Check out the MatterPort website here.

8bitfuture:

Startup company MatterPort has shown off their 3D scanner, able to rapidly create maps of rooms by scanning the device around the space.

While the scanner is still under development, the company won’t say how much it will go on sale for except it will be “18 times cheaper” than competing devices (which typically retail for $30,000 to $50,000).

Check out the MatterPort website here.

(via emergentfutures)

Can 3D Printing Make Everything We Need? - PSFK
This article titled “Is 3D printing the key to Utopia?” was written by John Naughton, for The Observer on Saturday 12th May 2012 23.05 UTC
You know the problem: the dishwasher that has cleaned your dishes faithfully for 15 years suddenly stops working. You call out a repairman who identifies the problem: the filter unit has finally given up the ghost. “Ah,” you say, much relieved, “can you fit a new one?” At which point the chap shakes his head sorrowfully. No can do, he explains. The company that made the machine was taken over years ago by another outfit and they no longer supply spares for your ancient machine.
Up until now, this story would have had a predictable ending in which you sorrowfully junked your trusty dishwasher and bought a new one. But there’s an emerging technology that could change that. It’s called three-dimensional printing.
Eh? Surely printing is intrinsically a two-dimensional process, involving the squirting of coloured dyes on to flat sheets of paper? And indeed it is, so perhaps the use of the word “printing” in 3D printing is a bit naughty – which is why men in suits tends to call it “additive manufacturing”. But there is still a strong metaphorical correspondence between the 2D and 3D processes. In the former, we take an electronic representation of a document on a computer screen and output a replica of that on to paper; in the latter, we take a three-dimensional computer model of something and use printing-like technology to create a three-dimensional version of it in plastic or other materials.
It works like this: a designer uses computer-assisted design software to create a three-dimensional model of an object. Another program then “slices” the model into thin sections and instructs the “printer” to lay down an exact replica of the section in plastic (or other types of) granules which are then fused to become a solid layer. The process is repeated, slice by slice, until the entire object has been made.
via PSFK:

Can 3D Printing Make Everything We Need? - PSFK

This article titled “Is 3D printing the key to Utopia?” was written by John Naughton, for The Observer on Saturday 12th May 2012 23.05 UTC

You know the problem: the dishwasher that has cleaned your dishes faithfully for 15 years suddenly stops working. You call out a repairman who identifies the problem: the filter unit has finally given up the ghost. “Ah,” you say, much relieved, “can you fit a new one?” At which point the chap shakes his head sorrowfully. No can do, he explains. The company that made the machine was taken over years ago by another outfit and they no longer supply spares for your ancient machine.

Up until now, this story would have had a predictable ending in which you sorrowfully junked your trusty dishwasher and bought a new one. But there’s an emerging technology that could change that. It’s called three-dimensional printing.

Eh? Surely printing is intrinsically a two-dimensional process, involving the squirting of coloured dyes on to flat sheets of paper? And indeed it is, so perhaps the use of the word “printing” in 3D printing is a bit naughty – which is why men in suits tends to call it “additive manufacturing”. But there is still a strong metaphorical correspondence between the 2D and 3D processes. In the former, we take an electronic representation of a document on a computer screen and output a replica of that on to paper; in the latter, we take a three-dimensional computer model of something and use printing-like technology to create a three-dimensional version of it in plastic or other materials.

It works like this: a designer uses computer-assisted design software to create a three-dimensional model of an object. Another program then “slices” the model into thin sections and instructs the “printer” to lay down an exact replica of the section in plastic (or other types of) granules which are then fused to become a solid layer. The process is repeated, slice by slice, until the entire object has been made.

First step toward creating a 3D artificial brain | KurzweilAI
Nerve cells growing on a three-dimensional nanocellulose scaffold. Functioning synapses are yellow; the red spots show where synapses have been destroyed (credit: Philip Krantz, Chalmers)
Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg have taken the first step in creating a three-dimensional model of the brain by attaching neurons to a positively charged nanocellulose scaffold.
The purpose is to understand Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease better, for example.
Nitrocellulose (microfibrillated cellulose) is obtained from plant materials, such as woodpulp.
‟Pores can be created in nanocellulose, which allows nerve cells to grow in a three-dimensional matrix. This makes it extra comfortable for the cells and creates a realistic cultivation environment that is more like a real brain compared with a three-dimensional cell cultivation well,” says Paul Gatenholm, Professor of Biopolymer Technology at Chalmers.

First step toward creating a 3D artificial brain | KurzweilAI

Nerve cells growing on a three-dimensional nanocellulose scaffold. Functioning synapses are yellow; the red spots show where synapses have been destroyed (credit: Philip Krantz, Chalmers)

Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg have taken the first step in creating a three-dimensional model of the brain by attaching neurons to a positively charged nanocellulose scaffold.

The purpose is to understand Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease better, for example.

Nitrocellulose (microfibrillated cellulose) is obtained from plant materials, such as woodpulp.

‟Pores can be created in nanocellulose, which allows nerve cells to grow in a three-dimensional matrix. This makes it extra comfortable for the cells and creates a realistic cultivation environment that is more like a real brain compared with a three-dimensional cell cultivation well,” says Paul Gatenholm, Professor of Biopolymer Technology at Chalmers.

The Virtual Center is a voice-enabled, web-based and easy to use 3D environment for meetings, collaborations, training, discussions and events of all kinds. It offers great ways to share any kind of web content, presentations and files. You can visit it anytime at http://bit.ly/ibmavc. Soon the Center will also enable Mac computers as well as PCs.

Augmented reality promises astronauts instant medical knowhow | Physorg.com
The Computer Assisted Medical Diagnosis and Surgery System, CAMDASS, is a wearable augmented reality prototype. Augmented reality merges actual and virtual reality by precisely combining computer-generated graphics with the wearer’s view. CAMDASS is focused for now on ultrasound examinations but in principle could guide other procedures. Credits: ESA/Space Applications Service NV
A new augmented reality unit developed by ESA can provide just-in-time medical expertise to astronauts. All they need to do is put on a head-mounted display for 3D guidance in diagnosing problems or even performing surgery.

Augmented reality promises astronauts instant medical knowhow | Physorg.com

The Computer Assisted Medical Diagnosis and Surgery System, CAMDASS, is a wearable augmented reality prototype. Augmented reality merges actual and virtual reality by precisely combining computer-generated graphics with the wearer’s view. CAMDASS is focused for now on ultrasound examinations but in principle could guide other procedures. Credits: ESA/Space Applications Service NV

A new augmented reality unit developed by ESA can provide just-in-time medical expertise to astronauts. All they need to do is put on a head-mounted display for 3D guidance in diagnosing problems or even performing surgery.

South Korea’s Live Park uses RFID and Kinect to bring your Holodeck fantasies one step nearer | Engadget
. Located near Seoul, Live Park uses  3D video, holograms and augmented reality, interacting with RFID wrist  bands and Kinect sensors to stitch together a continuous immersive  story. You (and your avatar!) have 65 attractions, over seven themed  zones, and the world’s biggest interactive 360 degree stereoscopic theater to wave, jump and shout your way through. Two years and $13  million in the making, Live Park’s creator d’strict is now looking to  license the concept out internationally, with locations in China and  Singapore already earmarked.

South Korea’s Live Park uses RFID and Kinect to bring your Holodeck fantasies one step nearer | Engadget

. Located near Seoul, Live Park uses 3D video, holograms and augmented reality, interacting with RFID wrist bands and Kinect sensors to stitch together a continuous immersive story. You (and your avatar!) have 65 attractions, over seven themed zones, and the world’s biggest interactive 360 degree stereoscopic theater to wave, jump and shout your way through. Two years and $13 million in the making, Live Park’s creator d’strict is now looking to license the concept out internationally, with locations in China and Singapore already earmarked.

Mineways turns your Minecraft creations into something you can hold | The Verge

New software called Mineways enables you to export your Minecraft creations into models and texture maps ready to send to a 3D printer. To do this, you’ll need an exported world map from Minecraft with your favorite design inside. Using a birds-eye view, you can then select the area you want to print, save it as a model, and then send it over to a 3D printing service like Shapeways. 

thisistheverge:

Scientists Hack Kinect to Study Glaciers and Asteroids | Wired Science | Wired.com
Last summer, Ken Mankoff shimmied through zero degree water and mud  into a small cavern underneath Rieperbreen Glacier in Svalbard, Norway,  holding a Microsoft Kinect wrapped inside a waterproof bag.
Using the little toy, originally meant as a motion-sensing device for  the Xbox 360 video game console, Mankoff scanned the cave floor in 3D.  During the summer, water from lakes on the glacier’s surface had gushed  through the channel he was sitting in. The Kinect was going to provide a  better understanding of its size and roughness, which could help  researchers predict how the ice above would flow toward the sea.
“I’ve always enjoyed repurposing cheap devices, doing things that you’re not supposed to do with them,” said Mankoff,  a NASA funded Ph.D. student at the University of California, Santa Cruz  studying ice and ocean interactions. “You know, the hacker ideals.”
He is currently a bit of an evangelist for the Kinect, trying to get  scientist interested in using the device, which can record very accurate  3D data in visible and infrared wavelengths.

Scientists Hack Kinect to Study Glaciers and Asteroids | Wired Science | Wired.com

Last summer, Ken Mankoff shimmied through zero degree water and mud into a small cavern underneath Rieperbreen Glacier in Svalbard, Norway, holding a Microsoft Kinect wrapped inside a waterproof bag.

Using the little toy, originally meant as a motion-sensing device for the Xbox 360 video game console, Mankoff scanned the cave floor in 3D. During the summer, water from lakes on the glacier’s surface had gushed through the channel he was sitting in. The Kinect was going to provide a better understanding of its size and roughness, which could help researchers predict how the ice above would flow toward the sea.

“I’ve always enjoyed repurposing cheap devices, doing things that you’re not supposed to do with them,” said Mankoff, a NASA funded Ph.D. student at the University of California, Santa Cruz studying ice and ocean interactions. “You know, the hacker ideals.”

He is currently a bit of an evangelist for the Kinect, trying to get scientist interested in using the device, which can record very accurate 3D data in visible and infrared wavelengths.