Forget 3G and 4G, terahertz could make cell phones 1,000 times faster | BGR.com
Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh announced that they have discovered a means of wirelessly transmitting data thousands of times faster than current standards, PCMag reported on Wednesday. The team is led by Hrvoje Petek, a physics and chemistry professor at the university, who has theoretically found a way to transmit data between devices in the terahertz frequency. Petek’s discovery of “a physical basis for terahertz bandwidth” could potentially be used to leverage the “portion of the electromagnetic spectrum between infrared and microwave light” and transmit data at rates 1,000 times faster than today’s wireless standards, which are limited to the gigahertz frequency. “The ability to modulate light with such a bandwidth could increase the amount of information carried by more than 1,000 times when compared to the volume carried with today’s technologies,” Petek said. “Needless to say, this has been a long-awaited discovery in the field.”
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Forget 3G and 4G, terahertz could make cell phones 1,000 times faster | BGR.com

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh announced that they have discovered a means of wirelessly transmitting data thousands of times faster than current standards, PCMag reported on Wednesday. The team is led by Hrvoje Petek, a physics and chemistry professor at the university, who has theoretically found a way to transmit data between devices in the terahertz frequency. Petek’s discovery of “a physical basis for terahertz bandwidth” could potentially be used to leverage the “portion of the electromagnetic spectrum between infrared and microwave light” and transmit data at rates 1,000 times faster than today’s wireless standards, which are limited to the gigahertz frequency. “The ability to modulate light with such a bandwidth could increase the amount of information carried by more than 1,000 times when compared to the volume carried with today’s technologies,” Petek said. “Needless to say, this has been a long-awaited discovery in the field.”

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I’ve always been a big fan of the Internet of Things, especially after Kevin Kelly’s TED lecture a few years back. After seeing this nice infographic done by Intel, I can only acknowledge we’re still in a very early stage of this idea.
Most types of devices you see (check the top right corner) are display devices, meaning they’ll present online content on a display, either “raw” as in a browser, or translated to an application like a game or a navigation system.
The real power of the Internet of Things will come when less obvious objects are connected to the internet. For example shoes, fridges, coffee machines, wardrobes, tooth brushes, doors, light switches… I’m sure there are shoes that go online already (Nike+ for example), coffee machines that make coffee based on the weather found online, tooth brushes that share your amount of turns and light switches that you can switch on and off from your smartphone. Yet these are hardly mainstream nor have they unveiled the true potential of the Internet Of Things.
If you think about all new technologies that are coming up in the coming months: 4G networks, RFID or NFC particularly, better face, object and voice recognition, … Combining that with faster processors, high resolution displays, longer battery life, … And putting that all into more objects we use every day, I think you can agree we’ve got some very exciting times ahead of us! The Internet of Things has only just started…

castemelijn:

I’ve always been a big fan of the Internet of Things, especially after Kevin Kelly’s TED lecture a few years back. After seeing this nice infographic done by Intel, I can only acknowledge we’re still in a very early stage of this idea.

Most types of devices you see (check the top right corner) are display devices, meaning they’ll present online content on a display, either “raw” as in a browser, or translated to an application like a game or a navigation system.

The real power of the Internet of Things will come when less obvious objects are connected to the internet. For example shoes, fridges, coffee machines, wardrobes, tooth brushes, doors, light switches… I’m sure there are shoes that go online already (Nike+ for example), coffee machines that make coffee based on the weather found online, tooth brushes that share your amount of turns and light switches that you can switch on and off from your smartphone. Yet these are hardly mainstream nor have they unveiled the true potential of the Internet Of Things.

If you think about all new technologies that are coming up in the coming months: 4G networks, RFID or NFC particularly, better face, object and voice recognition, … Combining that with faster processors, high resolution displays, longer battery life, … And putting that all into more objects we use every day, I think you can agree we’ve got some very exciting times ahead of us! The Internet of Things has only just started…

castemelijn: