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Watson at your service
“One moment, please.” “We’ll be with you shortly.” “You are eighth in the queue.” Sound all too familiar? Maybe not for long—The Watson Engagement Advisor can listen to customer queries, suggest personalized follow up questions and help operators find answers in a flash. For even faster service, callers can interact directly with Watson itself. Could this also mean an end to the need for mind-numbing “hold music?” (One can only hope.)

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Watson at your service

“One moment, please.” “We’ll be with you shortly.” “You are eighth in the queue.” Sound all too familiar? Maybe not for long—The Watson Engagement Advisor can listen to customer queries, suggest personalized follow up questions and help operators find answers in a flash. For even faster service, callers can interact directly with Watson itself. Could this also mean an end to the need for mind-numbing “hold music?” (One can only hope.)

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"Drawing from all kinds of information sources, Watson will power a whole new generation of cognitive apps — they’ll understand natural language, sense, hypothesize, constantly learn and confidently react and respond with contextual wisdom.”INSIDE THE INVENTIVE MINDSwami ChandrasekaranExecutive ArchitectIBM Watson Solutions

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"Drawing from all kinds of information sources, Watson will power a whole new generation of cognitive apps — they’ll understand natural language, sense, hypothesize, constantly learn and confidently react and respond with contextual wisdom.”

INSIDE THE INVENTIVE MIND
Swami Chandrasekaran
Executive Architect
IBM Watson Solutions

IBM research stakes its future on cognitive computing | ZDNet
IBM Senior Vice President John E. Kelly / Photo: Audrey Quinn
YORKTOWN HEIGHTS, NY – IBM began its colloquium on cognitive computing today with a jewel in the company’s crown. Senior Vice President John E. Kelly took the stage following a video from January 14th, 2011 – the day when IBM’s Watson machine handedly beat Jeopardy champs Ken Jennings and Ken Rutter.
“I remember saying to the audience at that time,” recalled Kelly, “I don’t know if we’re going to win today. But it’s only a matter of when not if a system like Watson is going to surpass human beings at this task. People asked, ‘When did you realize how important this was?’ I think I realized in the year coming up to this that this was really special. Something was really changing in the way that computer systems interacted with people – something very big beyond just a game show is occurring here.”
So what is going on here? The world of data is now exploding, Kelly said, and machines like Watson have arose to provide us with better ways of harnessing this information.
“We are literally creating a digital universe,” he said. “And the way we have to process that is different than we’ve ever experienced before. What we were creating was a system that would be able to deal with portions of this tsunami of data coming at us. If we try to use first generation computing against this wave, it can’t be done. So we need a whole different set of systems, extracting information from noisy data sources in order to come up with rational answers.”
Kelly broke down the history of computing into three eras. First, there was the the tabulating era, with early calculators and tabulating machines made of mechanical systems and later, vacuum tubes. “In the first era of computing we basically fed data in on punch cards,” he said. “There was really no extraction of the data itself, the data was just going along for the ride.”
Next came the programmable era of computing, which ranged in form from vacuum tubes to microprocessors. “It was about taking processes and putting them into the machine,” Kelly explained. “It’s completely controlled by the programming we inflict on the system.”
And now, Kelly said, we are entering the era of cognitive computing, where computers can help us to unlock the insights that this new wealth of data holds. “If we don’t make this transition,” Kelly argued, “the data will be too big for us to have any impact on it. I think that this era of computing is going to be about scaling human capability. The separation between human and machine is going to blur in a very fundamental way.”

IBM research stakes its future on cognitive computing | ZDNet

IBM Senior Vice President John E. Kelly / Photo: Audrey Quinn

YORKTOWN HEIGHTS, NY – IBM began its colloquium on cognitive computing today with a jewel in the company’s crown. Senior Vice President John E. Kelly took the stage following a video from January 14th, 2011 – the day when IBM’s Watson machine handedly beat Jeopardy champs Ken Jennings and Ken Rutter.

“I remember saying to the audience at that time,” recalled Kelly, “I don’t know if we’re going to win today. But it’s only a matter of when not if a system like Watson is going to surpass human beings at this task. People asked, ‘When did you realize how important this was?’ I think I realized in the year coming up to this that this was really special. Something was really changing in the way that computer systems interacted with people – something very big beyond just a game show is occurring here.”

So what is going on here? The world of data is now exploding, Kelly said, and machines like Watson have arose to provide us with better ways of harnessing this information.

“We are literally creating a digital universe,” he said. “And the way we have to process that is different than we’ve ever experienced before. What we were creating was a system that would be able to deal with portions of this tsunami of data coming at us. If we try to use first generation computing against this wave, it can’t be done. So we need a whole different set of systems, extracting information from noisy data sources in order to come up with rational answers.”

Kelly broke down the history of computing into three eras. First, there was the the tabulating era, with early calculators and tabulating machines made of mechanical systems and later, vacuum tubes. “In the first era of computing we basically fed data in on punch cards,” he said. “There was really no extraction of the data itself, the data was just going along for the ride.”

Next came the programmable era of computing, which ranged in form from vacuum tubes to microprocessors. “It was about taking processes and putting them into the machine,” Kelly explained. “It’s completely controlled by the programming we inflict on the system.”

And now, Kelly said, we are entering the era of cognitive computing, where computers can help us to unlock the insights that this new wealth of data holds. “If we don’t make this transition,” Kelly argued, “the data will be too big for us to have any impact on it. I think that this era of computing is going to be about scaling human capability. The separation between human and machine is going to blur in a very fundamental way.”

One of the latest artificial intelligence systems from MIT is as smart as a 4-year-old
When kids eat glue, they’re exhibiting a lack of common sense. Computers equipped with artificial intelligence, it turns out, suffer from a similar problem.
While computers can tell you the chemical composition of glue, most can’t tell you if it is a gross choice for a snack. They lack the common sense that is ingrained in adult humans. 
For the last decade, MIT researchers have been building a system called ConceptNet that can equip computers with common-sense associations. It can process that a person may desire a dessert such as cake, which has the quality of being sweet. The system is structured as a graph, with connections between related concepts and terms.
The University of Illinois-Chicago announced today that its researchers put ConceptNet to the test with an IQ assessment developed for young children. ConceptNet 4, the second-most recent iteration from MIT, earned a score equivalent to the average 4-year-old. It did well at vocabulary and recognizing similarities, but did poorly at answering “why” questions. Children would normally get similar scores in each of the categories.

One of the latest artificial intelligence systems from MIT is as smart as a 4-year-old

When kids eat glue, they’re exhibiting a lack of common sense. Computers equipped with artificial intelligence, it turns out, suffer from a similar problem.

While computers can tell you the chemical composition of glue, most can’t tell you if it is a gross choice for a snack. They lack the common sense that is ingrained in adult humans. 

For the last decade, MIT researchers have been building a system called ConceptNet that can equip computers with common-sense associations. It can process that a person may desire a dessert such as cake, which has the quality of being sweet. The system is structured as a graph, with connections between related concepts and terms.

The University of Illinois-Chicago announced today that its researchers put ConceptNet to the test with an IQ assessment developed for young children. ConceptNet 4, the second-most recent iteration from MIT, earned a score equivalent to the average 4-year-old. It did well at vocabulary and recognizing similarities, but did poorly at answering “why” questions. Children would normally get similar scores in each of the categories.

There Are Now Six IBM Watsons, Here’s What They’re Doing | Mashable

IBM’s cognitive supercomputer, called Watson, famously won Jeopardy two years ago. That was just the beginning. IBM has built six Watsons in the last year, deploying them to do what the system was designed for: Give healthcare professionals fast answers to complex medical questions.

Both the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and WellPoint have gotten themselves a Watson, and have been training them in the last year to apply its learning algorithms and vast computing power to helping patients. Similar to Siri, Watson was designed to give useful answers to natural-language questions. Rather than spitting back a series of links like a traditional search engine, Watson tries to find the single, correct answer to whatever it’s asked.