Top 5 Augmented Reality Apps For Android : The Droid Guy

Ingress

ingress

Ingress is a game developed by Niantic Labs is probably the best AR game available right now. The game allows you to choose between two sides, Enlightened or Resistance. The gameplay will then depend on the choice you make. Your surroundings become the game environment where you will need to collect objects, tap sources of energy or capture enemy territory. The game is currently in closed beta but will soon be made available to the public.

Steve Mann: My “Augmediated” Life - IEEE Spectrum

Steve Mann, a professor in the department of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Toronto, has been designing and wearing computerized eyewear for decades, the gear increasing markedly in sophistication over time.

Steve Mann: My “Augmediated” Life - IEEE Spectrum

Steve Mann, a professor in the department of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Toronto, has been designing and wearing computerized eyewear for decades, the gear increasing markedly in sophistication over time.

Pioneer shows off augmented reality device for cars
Pioneer, a Japanese maker of automotive navigation systems, was in attendance at the CEATEC 2012 event in Japan where it showcased its use of augmented reality in a heads up display for a car. The company has extensive experience in the realm of augmented reality and vehicles and believes that the technology could unlock a new generation of navigation devices for the auto industry. Automakers too have shown interest in augmented reality, adding momentum to Pioneer’s efforts.

Pioneer shows off augmented reality device for cars

Pioneer, a Japanese maker of automotive navigation systems, was in attendance at the CEATEC 2012 event in Japan where it showcased its use of augmented reality in a heads up display for a car. The company has extensive experience in the realm of augmented reality and vehicles and believes that the technology could unlock a new generation of navigation devices for the auto industry. Automakers too have shown interest in augmented reality, adding momentum to Pioneer’s efforts.

The untapped potential of augmented reality | Digital Trends
It seems like augmented reality has been tipped to take off for a few years now, so where is it? Why aren’t we using it in our daily lives?

Augmented reality or AR has been around for years. Back in 2009 we were talking about AR’s potential impact on our lives. The idea of overlaying information on your view of the real world is familiar to everyone. Thanks to sci-fi movies like the Terminator series, we all have a pretty good idea of how useful it could be. The convergence of cameras, location awareness, and apps in our modern smartphones made AR really accessible for the first time. If you care to look, there are a lot of AR apps in Google Play and the App Store. So why isn’t anybody using them?
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The untapped potential of augmented reality | Digital Trends

It seems like augmented reality has been tipped to take off for a few years now, so where is it? Why aren’t we using it in our daily lives?

Augmented reality or AR has been around for years. Back in 2009 we were talking about AR’s potential impact on our lives. The idea of overlaying information on your view of the real world is familiar to everyone. Thanks to sci-fi movies like the Terminator series, we all have a pretty good idea of how useful it could be. The convergence of cameras, location awareness, and apps in our modern smartphones made AR really accessible for the first time. If you care to look, there are a lot of AR apps in Google Play and the App Store. So why isn’t anybody using them?



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Ikea’s Augmented-Reality Catalog Might Be the Company’s Best-Made Product Yet | Gizmodo

We’ve already shared our favorite items from Ikea’s 2013 product catalog, but what we didn’t know was that as of July 31st, the catalog itself will be an interactive product of the latest augmented-reality technology.

iOS and Android users who download the Ikea catalog app, will be able to unlock video features, interactive experiences with products on the page, photo galleries and additional decorating inspiration.

Developed by the creative agency McCann, the AR app is a project that the Swedish build-it-yourself furniture empire has been working on for quite a while, since 2011 when they first expressed interset in bridging the print/digital divide. Linus Karlsson, Global Chief Creative Officer of McCann, explained to Wired that replacing the paper catalog with an entirely digital product wouldn’t make sense, “If you had a magazine that had 211 million copies in circulation, you just would’t end it. That would be crazy.”

With this added digital layer, shopping Ikea’s collection will become a little bit easier—an “X-ray” feature allows you to peer inside cabinets, for example, making a trip to the brick-and-mortar store potentially unnecessary. (Not enough of Ikea’s collection is available for purchase online to cut out a trip to the store entirely.)

Augmented reality growing popular with U.S. military - QR Code Press
The practical applications of augmented reality are gaining more attention, however, especially amongst military and security organizations. A new report from Mind Commerce, a research organization, shows that augmented reality is, indeed, becoming a popular topic within the U.S. military. 

Augmented reality growing popular with U.S. military - QR Code Press

The practical applications of augmented reality are gaining more attention, however, especially amongst military and security organizations. A new report from Mind Commerce, a research organization, shows that augmented reality is, indeed, becoming a popular topic within the U.S. military. 

IBM launches augmented reality app for grocery stores | VentureBeat
Attention, shoppers. IBM has unveiled an augmented reality mobile app that lets you pan store shelves with your smartphones to receive personalized product tips, recommendations, and coupons.
The app is one more example of a creative use of augmented reality, which blends digital data with real-world imagery. The app brings the benefits of digital commerce to traditional brick-and-mortar stores, where 92 percent of retail still takes place, according to market researcher Forrester Research.

IBM launches augmented reality app for grocery stores | VentureBeat

Attention, shoppers. IBM has unveiled an augmented reality mobile app that lets you pan store shelves with your smartphones to receive personalized product tips, recommendations, and coupons.

The app is one more example of a creative use of augmented reality, which blends digital data with real-world imagery. The app brings the benefits of digital commerce to traditional brick-and-mortar stores, where 92 percent of retail still takes place, according to market researcher Forrester Research.

Founders of Leap Motion: Our Amazing 3D Tracking Will Be Everywhere | Singularity Hub
In the past few weeks the Leap Motion device has sent shudders of delight through gadget lovers and computer designers alike by promising a new kind of ultra-accurate, and very cheap, optical 3D tracking for your desktop or laptop computer. Forget the Kinect, Leap Motion is cheaper ($70), more precise (down to 0.01 mm), and much smaller (think “pack of gum” proportions). The incredible demo for the Leap Motion (see below) shows how the desktop device can quickly detect hand motion so that a user needs merely wiggle their fingers in front of their computer to intuitively control what happens on the screen. Currently taking pre-orders, the Leap Motion is scheduled to ship between December and February, and with it will come a new market of third party apps designed to take full advantage of the device. I had a chance to sit down with CEO Michael Buckwald and CTO David Holtz and test out the Leap Motion first hand. If things go their way, the Leap Motion will become the “third input device” for computers, joining the keyboard and mouse in a new triumvirate of digital control.  

Founders of Leap Motion: Our Amazing 3D Tracking Will Be Everywhere | Singularity Hub

In the past few weeks the Leap Motion device has sent shudders of delight through gadget lovers and computer designers alike by promising a new kind of ultra-accurate, and very cheap, optical 3D tracking for your desktop or laptop computer. Forget the Kinect, Leap Motion is cheaper ($70), more precise (down to 0.01 mm), and much smaller (think “pack of gum” proportions). The incredible demo for the Leap Motion (see below) shows how the desktop device can quickly detect hand motion so that a user needs merely wiggle their fingers in front of their computer to intuitively control what happens on the screen. Currently taking pre-orders, the Leap Motion is scheduled to ship between December and February, and with it will come a new market of third party apps designed to take full advantage of the device. I had a chance to sit down with CEO Michael Buckwald and CTO David Holtz and test out the Leap Motion first hand. If things go their way, the Leap Motion will become the “third input device” for computers, joining the keyboard and mouse in a new triumvirate of digital control.  

Leathernext: Marines Want Better Networks, Sensors — And Terminator Vision | Danger Room | Wired.com
The Marines of the future are all about communication.
The Leathernecks want data networks that can keep them connected all the way from the decks of their ships to the beaches they storm. They want online search tools that rely on natural language instead of keywords (like the rest of us). And they want software that can sift through the oceans of data their wartime sensors and cameras collect — including tools that can scan through faces in a crowd, like the Terminator, and alert Marines to danger.
That’s according to the Corps’ blueprint for its science and technology needs over the next 20 years. Communications are a big, gaping hole for the Marines of the present, and the Marines want to hand their successors more seamless, networked ways of talking. That’s on top of other wish-list material, like advanced sensors that can sniff drugs and homemade bombs — oh, and laser-stopping goggles.
The blueprint (.pdf), first published by Inside Defense, doesn’t come out and criticize the Corps’ current suite of communications tools and sensors. But there’s a yawning technological chasm in-between the present-day Marines and where the Leathernecks want to be in 2025.
From “flagpole to fighting hole,” the blueprint writes, Marines need to be in constant communication: “The objective is to provide a holistic, end-to-end, turnkey [command-and-control] capability to execute commander’s intent, facilitate implicit communications, visualize battlespace reality, promote initiative, enable centralized command and decentralized control, and ultimately accomplish the mission.”

Leathernext: Marines Want Better Networks, Sensors — And Terminator Vision | Danger Room | Wired.com

The Marines of the future are all about communication.

The Leathernecks want data networks that can keep them connected all the way from the decks of their ships to the beaches they storm. They want online search tools that rely on natural language instead of keywords (like the rest of us). And they want software that can sift through the oceans of data their wartime sensors and cameras collect — including tools that can scan through faces in a crowd, like the Terminator, and alert Marines to danger.

That’s according to the Corps’ blueprint for its science and technology needs over the next 20 years. Communications are a big, gaping hole for the Marines of the present, and the Marines want to hand their successors more seamless, networked ways of talking. That’s on top of other wish-list material, like advanced sensors that can sniff drugs and homemade bombs — oh, and laser-stopping goggles.

The blueprint (.pdf), first published by Inside Defense, doesn’t come out and criticize the Corps’ current suite of communications tools and sensors. But there’s a yawning technological chasm in-between the present-day Marines and where the Leathernecks want to be in 2025.

From “flagpole to fighting hole,” the blueprint writes, Marines need to be in constant communication: “The objective is to provide a holistic, end-to-end, turnkey [command-and-control] capability to execute commander’s intent, facilitate implicit communications, visualize battlespace reality, promote initiative, enable centralized command and decentralized control, and ultimately accomplish the mission.”

Laser System Paints Information on the Road Ahead   | Technology Review
Ever wondered if you could control your house’s climate, security, and appliances — along with your PCs and peripherals — using Microsoft software? That day may soon dawn, as its Research arm has started testing its home automation software, called HomeOS, in twelve domiciles over the past few months. The budding system views smartphones, printers and air conditioners as network peripherals, controlled by a dedicated gateway computer. The project even has a handful of apps in play, which perform functions like energy monitoring, remote surveillance and face-recognition. This growing list of applications, available through a portal called “HomeStore”, will allow users to easily expand their system’s capabilities. So how does it all work out in the real world? Head past the break, and let Redmond’s research team give you the skinny.

Laser System Paints Information on the Road Ahead   | Technology Review

Ever wondered if you could control your house’s climate, security, and appliances — along with your PCs and peripherals — using Microsoft software? That day may soon dawn, as its Research arm has started testing its home automation software, called HomeOS, in twelve domiciles over the past few months. The budding system views smartphones, printers and air conditioners as network peripherals, controlled by a dedicated gateway computer. The project even has a handful of apps in play, which perform functions like energy monitoring, remote surveillance and face-recognition. This growing list of applications, available through a portal called “HomeStore”, will allow users to easily expand their system’s capabilities. So how does it all work out in the real world? Head past the break, and let Redmond’s research team give you the skinny.

Oakley Plans To Launch Its Own Brand Of AR Glasses - PSFK
At the start of this month, Google secretly began testing its augmented reality goggles with selected employees. The prototype eyewear allows users to view messages, videos, maps, and images in real-time. Now, Oakley has confirmed that it’s testing similar technology that will rival Google’s ‘Project Glass.’
Colin Baden, CEO of Oakley, stated in an interview that:

As an organization, we’ve been chasing this beast since 1997. Ultimately, everything happens through your eyes, and the closer we can bring it to your eyes, the quicker the consumer is going to adopt the platform.

Oakley has been working on technology to produce head-mounted displays for nearly 15 years, and has 600 patents mainly relating to optical specifications. Baden refused to confirm if Oakley would produce its own pair of smart glasses, or if the company would only license its technology.

via PSFK:

Oakley Plans To Launch Its Own Brand Of AR Glasses - PSFK

At the start of this month, Google secretly began testing its augmented reality goggles with selected employees. The prototype eyewear allows users to view messages, videos, maps, and images in real-time. Now, Oakley has confirmed that it’s testing similar technology that will rival Google’s ‘Project Glass.’

Colin Baden, CEO of Oakley, stated in an interview that:

As an organization, we’ve been chasing this beast since 1997. Ultimately, everything happens through your eyes, and the closer we can bring it to your eyes, the quicker the consumer is going to adopt the platform.

Oakley has been working on technology to produce head-mounted displays for nearly 15 years, and has 600 patents mainly relating to optical specifications. Baden refused to confirm if Oakley would produce its own pair of smart glasses, or if the company would only license its technology.



via PSFK: