AT&T to launch Digital Life in 15 markets, hopes to enter home automation field
AT&T is finally set to launch its Digital Life home automation service, and it’s ready to do so in a big way. Initially planned for just eight markets, the telephony giant has expanded its coverage to 15 starting this spring, with the hope of 50 by the end of the year. Essentially a way to monitor your home, Digital Life packages may include live video, the ability to remotely toggle the light on and off, change the thermostat, unlock the door and more. Customers are able to set up programs and alerts via smartphone or tablet applications or the web. AT&T should bring some heavy clout to the home automation party, though it won’t be the first big-name communications company to do so. For more information on Digital Life and what it offers, have a peek at the source below.

 AT&T to launch Digital Life in 15 markets, hopes to enter home automation field

AT&T is finally set to launch its Digital Life home automation service, and it’s ready to do so in a big way. Initially planned for just eight markets, the telephony giant has expanded its coverage to 15 starting this spring, with the hope of 50 by the end of the year. Essentially a way to monitor your home, Digital Life packages may include live video, the ability to remotely toggle the light on and off, change the thermostat, unlock the door and more. Customers are able to set up programs and alerts via smartphone or tablet applications or the web. AT&T should bring some heavy clout to the home automation party, though it won’t be the first big-name communications company to do so. For more information on Digital Life and what it offers, have a peek at the source below.

Carriers set to chip in $100M in Isis to take on Google | GigaOM

AT&T, Verizon and T-Mobile are reportedly poised to invest $100 million in their joint mobile payment venture called Isis, a near field communication-based contactless payment system that will do battle in the increasingly competitive mobile payments market. According to Bloomberg, the carriers are still determining exactly how much to invest based on Isis’ ability to obtain support from banks and merchants, but they could throw in a lot more money if the platform can gain momentum.
Isis will have to play catch-up with Google Wallet , the open NFC platform launched by Google, MasterCard and Citibank. That payment system was unveiled in May and is set to open to the public soon. Google Wallet lets people pay for things by waving their NFC-enabled Android phone at point-of-sale terminals that are equipped to handle MasterCard Paypass purchases. However, Google’s offering is limited right now to just the Nexus S from Sprint, and it hasn’t announced new credit card or banking partners beyond MasterCard and Citibank.
Isis, meanwhile, is backed by credit card companies MasterCard, Visa , American Expressand Discover. But the first trials won’t begin until next year in Salt Lake City and Austin, Texas. That will put it behind Google Wallet, though with few NFC-enabled devices available so far, it may not be that much of a disadvantage. But will consumers even embrace NFC payments on their handsets when the tech does become available? Questions about thesecurity, reliability and fees of mobile payments still suggest that adoption will be slow, at least initially.

Carriers set to chip in $100M in Isis to take on Google | GigaOM

AT&T, Verizon and T-Mobile are reportedly poised to invest $100 million in their joint mobile payment venture called Isis, a near field communication-based contactless payment system that will do battle in the increasingly competitive mobile payments market. According to Bloomberg, the carriers are still determining exactly how much to invest based on Isis’ ability to obtain support from banks and merchants, but they could throw in a lot more money if the platform can gain momentum.

Isis will have to play catch-up with Google Wallet the open NFC platform launched by Google, MasterCard and Citibank. That payment system was unveiled in May and is set to open to the public soon. Google Wallet lets people pay for things by waving their NFC-enabled Android phone at point-of-sale terminals that are equipped to handle MasterCard Paypass purchases. However, Google’s offering is limited right now to just the Nexus S from Sprint, and it hasn’t announced new credit card or banking partners beyond MasterCard and Citibank.

Isis, meanwhile, is backed by credit card companies MasterCard, Visa , American Expressand Discover. But the first trials won’t begin until next year in Salt Lake City and Austin, Texas. That will put it behind Google Wallet, though with few NFC-enabled devices available so far, it may not be that much of a disadvantage. But will consumers even embrace NFC payments on their handsets when the tech does become available? Questions about thesecurity, reliability and fees of mobile payments still suggest that adoption will be slow, at least initially.

Why Winning Over Merchants Will be Key To Mobile Payments | GigaOM
For mobile payments to soar, it doesn’t take just the creativity and  resources of carriers, financial institutions, start-ups and Web  players. The gobs of money spent on making mobile payments happen may be  for naught if merchants aren’t on board. And the industry is learning  that. That’s one of the key lessons absorbed by Michael Abbott, the CEO  of Isis, a mobile payment joint venture by Verizon Wireless , AT&T  and T-Mobile.
Abbott, who joined Isis in November after ten years as CMO of GE  Capital, said the carriers all considered their own payment services but  they realized after talking to merchants and businesses that they  didn’t want a bunch of competing options from the operators. So the  carriers banded together to create Isis,  which initially was designed to run on a new near field communication  (NFC) payment network. Then when they took their payment service to the  merchants, they were again told that they don’t want a separate payment  network apart from the big players like MasterCard and Visa. They wanted  a solution that works together. So Isis put aside plans for its own Discover-powered payment network and is now looking to partner with more credit card companies and banks. 

Why Winning Over Merchants Will be Key To Mobile Payments | GigaOM

For mobile payments to soar, it doesn’t take just the creativity and resources of carriers, financial institutions, start-ups and Web players. The gobs of money spent on making mobile payments happen may be for naught if merchants aren’t on board. And the industry is learning that. That’s one of the key lessons absorbed by Michael Abbott, the CEO of Isis, a mobile payment joint venture by Verizon Wireless , AT&T and T-Mobile.

Abbott, who joined Isis in November after ten years as CMO of GE Capital, said the carriers all considered their own payment services but they realized after talking to merchants and businesses that they didn’t want a bunch of competing options from the operators. So the carriers banded together to create Isis, which initially was designed to run on a new near field communication (NFC) payment network. Then when they took their payment service to the merchants, they were again told that they don’t want a separate payment network apart from the big players like MasterCard and Visa. They wanted a solution that works together. So Isis put aside plans for its own Discover-powered payment network and is now looking to partner with more credit card companies and banks. 

Wireless carriers such as AT&T Corp. are setting their sights on so-called smart grids as a big business opportunity that could juice up earnings by utilizing excess capacity on their cellphone networks. The upshot for consumers is they may eventually be able to monitor and control home-energy use through a cellphone that talks to a digital meter and other devices, though that service is still in development. (via Wireless Firms Eye ‘Smart Grids’ - WSJ.com)

Wireless carriers such as AT&T Corp. are setting their sights on so-called smart grids as a big business opportunity that could juice up earnings by utilizing excess capacity on their cellphone networks. The upshot for consumers is they may eventually be able to monitor and control home-energy use through a cellphone that talks to a digital meter and other devices, though that service is still in development. (via Wireless Firms Eye ‘Smart Grids’ - WSJ.com)