The Disruptive Business Model that Could Change the Tablet Market | PCMag.com

One of the most interesting things about the tablet market these days—besides the fact that Apple basically owns it—is that in the very near future, I believe there will be two very different business models that will drive tablets into the broader consumer market.

The first model, the one Apple uses today, is very traditional. In this case, Apple makes the iPad and then sells it through its retail stores, its online store, and various third-party resellers like Best Buy and Target. If the iPad has a 4G modem in it, it is also available through carriers like AT&T and Verizon. Samsung and other Android vendors also use this business model and whenWindows 8 tablets come out, most of them will sell those tablets in a similar way.

A second business model, called subsidization, is also unfolding and is already in use by the carriers to sell cell phones. Apple, for example, sells an iPhone to the carriers for somewhere around $600 but they in turn only charge the customer $200. They basically subsidize the upfront cost of the phone and earn back this cost by tying a user to a two-year service contract to amortize their cost of the iPhone to Apple. In fact, carriers have been using this subsidization model to sell phones for a long time and when the iPad came out, some customers expected the carriers to subsidize the iPad similarly. That did not happen, however, and customers basically buy the iPad at full retail price.

With the Fire, as with its its whizzy-gizmo predecessors, the iPad and the Nook Color, we are seeing the e-book begin to assume its true aesthetic, which would seem to be far closer to the aesthetic of the web than to that of the printed page: text embedded in a welter of functions and features, a symphony of intrusive beeps. Even the more restrained Kindle Touch, also introduced today, comes with a feature called X-Ray that seems designed to ensure that a book’s words never gain too tight a grip over a reader’s consciousness: “With a single tap, readers can see all the passages across a book that mention ideas, fictional characters, historical figures, places or topics that interest them, as well as more detailed descriptions from Wikipedia and Shelfari, Amazon’s community-powered encyclopedia for book lovers.” The original Kindle, now discounted to $79, is beginning to look like a dusty relic - something for the rocking-chair set.

More and more major businesses and industries are being run on software and delivered as online services—from movies to agriculture to national defense. Many of the winners are Silicon Valley-style entrepreneurial technology companies that are invading and overturning established industry structures. Over the next 10 years, I expect many more industries to be disrupted by software, with new world-beating Silicon Valley companies doing the disruption in more cases than not.

Knocking Down Apple’s Walled Garden: HTML5 vs. iOS Apps | ReadWriteWeb
Today Amazon launched an HTML5 browser version of its market leading eReader application, Kindle. Called Kindle Cloud Reader, it’s a direct response to the 30% cut of sales that Apple now takes from in-app purchases and subscriptions via iOS  apps. The 30% Apple toll hits businesses like Amazon hard, because the  margins on book sales are slim enough as it is.
The HTML5 Kindle site appears to be optimized for the iPad. It’s  accessed from the Safari browser in the iPad, so it routes around  Apple’s App Store. That means Amazon doesn’t need to give Apple 30% of  an eBook sale. Because the HTML5 site is very close to the functionality  of the iPad Kindle app, this is going to have huge ramifications for  Apple. Yes, Apple’s walled garden has just been structurally weakened. I’d go as far as to say that it’s a matter of months, not years, before Amazon pulls its iOS Kindle app from the App Store.

Knocking Down Apple’s Walled Garden: HTML5 vs. iOS Apps | ReadWriteWeb

Today Amazon launched an HTML5 browser version of its market leading eReader application, Kindle. Called Kindle Cloud Reader, it’s a direct response to the 30% cut of sales that Apple now takes from in-app purchases and subscriptions via iOS apps. The 30% Apple toll hits businesses like Amazon hard, because the margins on book sales are slim enough as it is.

The HTML5 Kindle site appears to be optimized for the iPad. It’s accessed from the Safari browser in the iPad, so it routes around Apple’s App Store. That means Amazon doesn’t need to give Apple 30% of an eBook sale. Because the HTML5 site is very close to the functionality of the iPad Kindle app, this is going to have huge ramifications for Apple. Yes, Apple’s walled garden has just been structurally weakened. I’d go as far as to say that it’s a matter of months, not years, before Amazon pulls its iOS Kindle app from the App Store.

Toucans With GPS Backpacks Help Biologists Study Tropical Forest | Wired Science | Wired.com
Toucans outfitted with GPS backpacks are helping researchers track the spread of seeds in tropical forests.
The nutmeg-loving toucan unwittingly plants new trees by gulping whole seeds, processing the soft outer pulp in its crop, and spitting out the hard inner seed. But researchers could only guess how far the seeds would drop from a parent tree.
So conservation biologists from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute netted six toucans from a rainforest near Gamboa, Panama, and strapped on lightweight backpacks containing a GPS tracker and an accelerometer. The backpacks recorded location and activity level, and were designed to fall off after 10 days.

Toucans With GPS Backpacks Help Biologists Study Tropical Forest | Wired Science | Wired.com

Toucans outfitted with GPS backpacks are helping researchers track the spread of seeds in tropical forests.

The nutmeg-loving toucan unwittingly plants new trees by gulping whole seeds, processing the soft outer pulp in its crop, and spitting out the hard inner seed. But researchers could only guess how far the seeds would drop from a parent tree.

So conservation biologists from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute netted six toucans from a rainforest near Gamboa, Panama, and strapped on lightweight backpacks containing a GPS tracker and an accelerometer. The backpacks recorded location and activity level, and were designed to fall off after 10 days.

Ending months of speculation about Amazon.com’s electronic book project, Chief Executive Jeff Bezos just presented the Kindle 2.0 at an event at the Morgan Library in New York. (via Brier Dudley’s blog | Amazon’s Bezos unveils Kindle 2.0: Thinner than iPhone, but no color yet | Seattle Times Newspaper Blog)

Ending months of speculation about Amazon.com’s electronic book project, Chief Executive Jeff Bezos just presented the Kindle 2.0 at an event at the Morgan Library in New York. (via Brier Dudley’s blog | Amazon’s Bezos unveils Kindle 2.0: Thinner than iPhone, but no color yet | Seattle Times Newspaper Blog)