The Big Data Boom Is the Innovation Story of Our Time - Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee | The Atlantic

While passive data gathering can be useful, measurement is far more valuable when coupled with conscious, active experimentation and sharing of insights. Likewise, the value of undertaking the experiments themselves is proportionately greater if the organization can capitalize on those experiments in more locations and at greater scale. In combination, these practices constitute a new kind of “R&D” that draws on the strengths of digitization to speed innovation.

Available massive amounts of data paired with cheap processing power will boost the experimentation and learning dramatically, as the microscope did. But having witnessed the great organizational inertia when it came to rely on the results from e g Finite Element analysis instead of extremely expensive physical testing - and in my experience it was full scale car crash tests - I am hesitant to think that this will have impact on how traditional organizations do things. I can rather see that universities, entrepreneurs and skilled amateurs will provide the lion part of the growth in this area. The innovation story will then mainly be written by small research groups or curious individuals who have an idea that they will try out in an experiment with a huge body of real data. And some of them will find definitely strike gold…

via futuramb:

Enterprise 2.0 Is Growing Up - WSJ
Social networking tools keep flowing into large companies, but the road map for implementation is still on the drawing board.
The business opportunity continues to lure major software companies,  as indicated by the fact that Adobe, Avaya and Oracle set up booths for  the first time at the Enterprise 2.0 Conference,  now in its seventh year. They joined other big players such as IBM,  Microsoft and Cisco at the Boston event this week along with  venture-backed companies such as Jive Software.
While most big organizations have some Enterprise 2.0 users companies  adopting such tools wholesale are still a minority, said one of the  leading authorities on the trend, Andrew McAfee, principal research  scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The big  opportunity, he said in an interview, is to standardize the technology  and bake it into the enterprise.

In a keynote address at the conference, McAfee identified a potential  threat to Enterprise 2.0: bosses who still subscribe to the heads-down,  cubicle mentality, and the technology behind Watson, IBM’s  Jeopardy-playing computer. Watson’s ability to process unrelated data  will enable such executives to extract all sorts of useful information  about employees working in isolation without the need for social  networking.

Enterprise 2.0 Is Growing Up - WSJ

Social networking tools keep flowing into large companies, but the road map for implementation is still on the drawing board.

The business opportunity continues to lure major software companies, as indicated by the fact that Adobe, Avaya and Oracle set up booths for the first time at the Enterprise 2.0 Conference, now in its seventh year. They joined other big players such as IBM, Microsoft and Cisco at the Boston event this week along with venture-backed companies such as Jive Software.

While most big organizations have some Enterprise 2.0 users companies adopting such tools wholesale are still a minority, said one of the leading authorities on the trend, Andrew McAfee, principal research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The big opportunity, he said in an interview, is to standardize the technology and bake it into the enterprise.

In a keynote address at the conference, McAfee identified a potential threat to Enterprise 2.0: bosses who still subscribe to the heads-down, cubicle mentality, and the technology behind Watson, IBM’s Jeopardy-playing computer. Watson’s ability to process unrelated data will enable such executives to extract all sorts of useful information about employees working in isolation without the need for social networking.