No Longer Vaporware: The Internet of Things Is Finally Talking | Wired Opinion | Wired.com
Hackers began using increasingly inexpensive sensors and open source hardware—like the Arduino controller—to add intelligence to ordinary objects. There are now kits that let your plants tweet when they need to be watered and teensy printers that scour the web and print out stuff you might be interested in. And there are oodles of “quantified-self” projects: “I know a guy who put a tilt sensor in his beer mug. It lets him know precisely how much he drank during Oktoberfest,” Arduino hacker Charalampos Doukas says with a laugh. “Sensor prices are going down; sizes are going down. The only limit is your imagination.”

No Longer Vaporware: The Internet of Things Is Finally Talking | Wired Opinion | Wired.com

Hackers began using increasingly inexpensive sensors and open source hardware—like the Arduino controller—to add intelligence to ordinary objects. There are now kits that let your plants tweet when they need to be watered and teensy printers that scour the web and print out stuff you might be interested in. And there are oodles of “quantified-self” projects: “I know a guy who put a tilt sensor in his beer mug. It lets him know precisely how much he drank during Oktoberfest,” Arduino hacker Charalampos Doukas says with a laugh. “Sensor prices are going down; sizes are going down. The only limit is your imagination.”

  Belgian Hackers Let You Build Circuit Boards on the Web | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com
The rise of low-cost, hacker-friendly electronics is fueling a new wave of hardware hobbyists. Using programmable boards like the Arduino and dirt-chip computers like the Raspberry Pi, you can build everything from your very own supercomputers to an internet-connected beer fermentation refrigeration system.
But Belgium startup called Circuits.io wants to take this trend even further. It wants to give you the power to build your own custom circuit boards.
Historically, that’s been expensive and difficult for hobbyists to do, but Circuits.io wants to change that by offering a web-based circuit board design system made especially for hobbyists complete with library of open source component designs. And soon it will also offer a CafePress-style print-on-demand service for circuit boards.

  Belgian Hackers Let You Build Circuit Boards on the Web | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com

The rise of low-cost, hacker-friendly electronics is fueling a new wave of hardware hobbyists. Using programmable boards like the Arduino and dirt-chip computers like the Raspberry Pi, you can build everything from your very own supercomputers to an internet-connected beer fermentation refrigeration system.

But Belgium startup called Circuits.io wants to take this trend even further. It wants to give you the power to build your own custom circuit boards.

Historically, that’s been expensive and difficult for hobbyists to do, but Circuits.io wants to change that by offering a web-based circuit board design system made especially for hobbyists complete with library of open source component designs. And soon it will also offer a CafePress-style print-on-demand service for circuit boards.

MaKey MaKey “an invention kit for everyone” turns every day objects into things that can trigger the internet (technical term, there) as seen with the banana piano.
An invention kit for artists, kids, educators, engineers, designers, inventors, makers… You can use any material that can conduct at least a tiny bit of electricity - even ketchup or lemons!

MaKey MaKey “an invention kit for everyone” turns every day objects into things that can trigger the internet (technical term, there) as seen with the banana piano.

An invention kit for artists, kids, educators, engineers, designers, inventors, makers… You can use any material that can conduct at least a tiny bit of electricity - even ketchup or lemons!

Arduino-powered plant can water itself, thank you very much | Digital Trends
Make a trip to the nearest Radioshack and build yourself an automated self-watering plant so you no longer have to remember to do the task.

My personal rule for my apartment is: Don’t bring any living thing in except humans unless you want it to die. I just don’t have time to keep up with the care taking of plants and animals! So if you’re like me but still want a piece of nature in your home, perhaps you can build yourself this Arduino-powered self-watering plant, set it, and forget it.
Available via Instructables by Randy Sarafan, the self-watering plant tutorial requires you to have some basic mechanical skills to build an electronic pump which will feed your plant in your honor. There are several steps of wire attachment and fastening bits and pieces inside one power box, but each move is intuitive and pretty simple.
Read more: http://www.digitaltrends.com/computing/arduino-powered-plant-can-water-itself/#ixzz227Iwum7a

Arduino-powered plant can water itself, thank you very much | Digital Trends

Make a trip to the nearest Radioshack and build yourself an automated self-watering plant so you no longer have to remember to do the task.

My personal rule for my apartment is: Don’t bring any living thing in except humans unless you want it to die. I just don’t have time to keep up with the care taking of plants and animals! So if you’re like me but still want a piece of nature in your home, perhaps you can build yourself this Arduino-powered self-watering plant, set it, and forget it.

Available via Instructables by Randy Sarafan, the self-watering plant tutorial requires you to have some basic mechanical skills to build an electronic pump which will feed your plant in your honor. There are several steps of wire attachment and fastening bits and pieces inside one power box, but each move is intuitive and pretty simple.



Read more: http://www.digitaltrends.com/computing/arduino-powered-plant-can-water-itself/#ixzz227Iwum7a

How The $25 Computer Could Change The Way We Learn, Work & Play - PSFK
The Raspberry Pi is a very basic looking micro-board that hides a sophisticated computer – the UK developers behind the computer expect other companies, hackers and DIYers to add their own peripherals and even casing. What’s buzzing the technology scene is the price. At $25 plus shipping, the inventors believe that the Raspberry Pi can revolutionize education – but they don’t expect its impact to just stop there. PSFK spoke to the Executive Director of the Raspberry Pi Foundation, Eben Upton, about what he and his team had created and the changes it might help create.
OK. The dumb question: Why does your computer look like one of those cards you stick in the back of a desktop computer? It’s not quite as cute as an iPad. Where’s the shell?

We’re expecting community members to design (and sell) their own shells for the device. In fact, both our distribution partners (element14/Premier Farnell and RS Components) will be marketing their own shells too.

via PSFK: 

How The $25 Computer Could Change The Way We Learn, Work & Play - PSFK

The Raspberry Pi is a very basic looking micro-board that hides a sophisticated computer – the UK developers behind the computer expect other companies, hackers and DIYers to add their own peripherals and even casing. What’s buzzing the technology scene is the price. At $25 plus shipping, the inventors believe that the Raspberry Pi can revolutionize education – but they don’t expect its impact to just stop there. PSFK spoke to the Executive Director of the Raspberry Pi Foundation, Eben Upton, about what he and his team had created and the changes it might help create.

OK. The dumb question: Why does your computer look like one of those cards you stick in the back of a desktop computer? It’s not quite as cute as an iPad. Where’s the shell?

We’re expecting community members to design (and sell) their own shells for the device. In fact, both our distribution partners (element14/Premier Farnell and RS Components) will be marketing their own shells too.



via PSFK: 

Solving New York’s sewage problem - Salon.com
Sewage overflow is the No. 1 source of pollution for New York’s waterways, says Percifield, a graduate student at the School of Art, Media, and Technology at the Parsons New School of Design.  But information on how often or when the overflows occur is in short  supply. Percifield believes that if New York City’s water users had  access to timely information, they could adjust their behavior to cut  down on the amount of actual sewage they send into the system at the  very moment overflows are happening. Or at the very least decide to  postpone that swim in the East River.
“The idea is to provide localized information so people can make  decisions about recreational activity and hopefully encourage someone to  postpone a load of laundry or washing a big-deal pile of dishes, or  something like that, until the overflow has stopped,” says Percifield.
Percifield’s dream is to accomplish this by placing simple sensors at  each of New York City’s 490 “combined sewer overflow” points. The  sensors will be primed to send out text-message notifications every time  the city’s drainage maxes out. Taking his cues from the open-source,  do-it-yourself community, Percifield decided not to wait around for the  city’s Department of Environmental Protection to get on the job. He  designed and built his own sensor. Then he climbed down into the sewer  system to see if his hacked-together creation would work.

Solving New York’s sewage problem - Salon.com

Sewage overflow is the No. 1 source of pollution for New York’s waterways, says Percifield, a graduate student at the School of Art, Media, and Technology at the Parsons New School of Design. But information on how often or when the overflows occur is in short supply. Percifield believes that if New York City’s water users had access to timely information, they could adjust their behavior to cut down on the amount of actual sewage they send into the system at the very moment overflows are happening. Or at the very least decide to postpone that swim in the East River.

“The idea is to provide localized information so people can make decisions about recreational activity and hopefully encourage someone to postpone a load of laundry or washing a big-deal pile of dishes, or something like that, until the overflow has stopped,” says Percifield.

Percifield’s dream is to accomplish this by placing simple sensors at each of New York City’s 490 “combined sewer overflow” points. The sensors will be primed to send out text-message notifications every time the city’s drainage maxes out. Taking his cues from the open-source, do-it-yourself community, Percifield decided not to wait around for the city’s Department of Environmental Protection to get on the job. He designed and built his own sensor. Then he climbed down into the sewer system to see if his hacked-together creation would work.

Make: Online : Spy on your brain and heart with Arduino EEG
Have you always wanted to monitor your brains signals, but didn’t have the money or expertise for an expensive setup? I caught up yesterday with Jacob Shiach about the Arduino EEG Project, which I first heard at the Open Science Summit in Berkeley, CA back in July.

Make: Online : Spy on your brain and heart with Arduino EEG

Have you always wanted to monitor your brains signals, but didn’t have the money or expertise for an expensive setup? I caught up yesterday with Jacob Shiach about the Arduino EEG Project, which I first heard at the Open Science Summit in Berkeley, CA back in July.

Make: Online : Top ten “internet of things” videos

Deane Rimerman, of ReadWriteWeb, put together a top ten list of YouTube’s most popular videos introducing the concepts behind the “internet of things” (basically sensors and microcontrollers connected to the internets). Our “Introduction of Arduino” video, from 2007, starring Bre Pettis and Joe Grand, is #2 on the list.

Why Arduino Is a Hit With Hardware Hackers | Gadget Lab | Wired.com
Arduino began as a project in Italy in 2005 and since then has turned into an open source hardware movement. There are thousands of Arduino projects today such as electric meters, guitar amplifiers and Arduino-based gadgets that can tell you when your plants need water.  

Why Arduino Is a Hit With Hardware Hackers | Gadget Lab | Wired.com

Arduino began as a project in Italy in 2005 and since then has turned into an open source hardware movement. There are thousands of Arduino projects today such as electric meters, guitar amplifiers and Arduino-based gadgets that can tell you when your plants need water.