Oculus Is Awesome for Games, But It’s the Future of Movies

"I never thought I’d ever say this, but I’m onstage with Beck. He’s wearing his usual hat-and-blazer combo, and covering one of my favorite David Bowie songs. Out past the crowd is a full choir — a few faces I recognize because they played with Beck during last year’s Station to Station rolling art extravaganza — and a massive musical ensemble. People are cheering and taking photos. It’s incredible. Then I look down. Instead of seeing knees or feet, I see Beck’s Chelsea boots.
That’s when my brain reminds me I’m not actually on stage.
Instead, I’m sitting in a chair at the Sundance Film Festival’s New Frontier installation, wearing an Oculus Rift virtual reality headset. I’m watching  a retooled version of the 360-degree interactive video of Beck’s live performance of “Sound and Vision” that he and Chris Milk made for Lincoln last year. My I’m-a-rockstar dream is shattered, but it’s possible that this might actually be cooler than performing with a folk hero — I get to have all the fun of performing without worrying about singing off-key or being incapacitated by stage fright.

Full Story: Wired

Oculus Is Awesome for Games, But It’s the Future of Movies

"I never thought I’d ever say this, but I’m onstage with Beck. He’s wearing his usual hat-and-blazer combo, and covering one of my favorite David Bowie songs. Out past the crowd is a full choir — a few faces I recognize because they played with Beck during last year’s Station to Station rolling art extravaganza — and a massive musical ensemble. People are cheering and taking photos. It’s incredible. Then I look down. Instead of seeing knees or feet, I see Beck’s Chelsea boots.

That’s when my brain reminds me I’m not actually on stage.

Instead, I’m sitting in a chair at the Sundance Film Festival’s New Frontier installation, wearing an Oculus Rift virtual reality headset. I’m watching  a retooled version of the 360-degree interactive video of Beck’s live performance of “Sound and Vision” that he and Chris Milk made for Lincoln last year. My I’m-a-rockstar dream is shattered, but it’s possible that this might actually be cooler than performing with a folk hero — I get to have all the fun of performing without worrying about singing off-key or being incapacitated by stage fright.

Full Story: Wired

Garmin HUD projects directions onto your windshield | The Car Tech blog
Smartphones have pretty much taken over as the default navigation tool for many drivers. However, some locales (including our home state of California) have outright banned smartphone use in the  car: no windshield mounts, no dashboard cradles. So, how are you going to get your turn-by-turn directions when looking at your phone is illegal? Today, Garmin announced a new way to interact with its StreetPilot and Navigon smartphone navigation apps: the HUD.
HUD — short for head-up display — sits on the dashboard at the base of the windshield, where it projects navigation data upwards into the driver’s line of sight, either onto a transparent film affixed to the windshield glass or a reflector lens that attaches to the HUD device. Both the film and reflector lens are included with the device.
Garmin states that HUD will automatically adjust the brightness of its projections, so that the display remains visible in direct sunlight or at night. The device will be powered by a 12V charging cable with an integrated USB port for keeping your smartphone charged as well.

Garmin HUD projects directions onto your windshield | The Car Tech blog

Smartphones have pretty much taken over as the default navigation tool for many drivers. However, some locales (including our home state of California) have outright banned smartphone use in the car: no windshield mounts, no dashboard cradles. So, how are you going to get your turn-by-turn directions when looking at your phone is illegal? Today, Garmin announced a new way to interact with its StreetPilot and Navigon smartphone navigation apps: the HUD.

HUD — short for head-up display — sits on the dashboard at the base of the windshield, where it projects navigation data upwards into the driver’s line of sight, either onto a transparent film affixed to the windshield glass or a reflector lens that attaches to the HUD device. Both the film and reflector lens are included with the device.

Garmin states that HUD will automatically adjust the brightness of its projections, so that the display remains visible in direct sunlight or at night. The device will be powered by a 12V charging cable with an integrated USB port for keeping your smartphone charged as well.

Stadium App Lets Fans Order Food And Get On-Court Close Ups - PSFK
Although this app will encourage people to stare at their phones at a live event, it’s still an ingenious intersection of the home and live experiences.
“The home of the Brooklyn Nets released the Barclays Center app in an attempt to merge the best of the stadium experience with the technological benefits of watching the game from home.
The Barclays Center app, which is iOS and Android compatible, is a new event app that allows spectators to interact with live in-game footage and other arena features. The app, which connects through the arena’s public Wi-Fi and is powered by Cisco’s StadiumVision Mobile technology, provides fans the ability to access live, in-game video, the official television feed, a 30-second rewind feature for replays, and up to four different cameras – mixing TV angles and GoPros mounted around the arena.
Incredibly, the app also lets users order food from their seat, send messages for display on the scoreboard, check-in, and interact with other users. The StadiumVision Mobile technology provides a nearly seamless stream of action to your phone at only a two second delay.”

Stadium App Lets Fans Order Food And Get On-Court Close Ups - PSFK

Although this app will encourage people to stare at their phones at a live event, it’s still an ingenious intersection of the home and live experiences.

“The home of the Brooklyn Nets released the Barclays Center app in an attempt to merge the best of the stadium experience with the technological benefits of watching the game from home.

The Barclays Center app, which is iOS and Android compatible, is a new event app that allows spectators to interact with live in-game footage and other arena features. The app, which connects through the arena’s public Wi-Fi and is powered by Cisco’s StadiumVision Mobile technology, provides fans the ability to access live, in-game video, the official television feed, a 30-second rewind feature for replays, and up to four different cameras – mixing TV angles and GoPros mounted around the arena.

Incredibly, the app also lets users order food from their seat, send messages for display on the scoreboard, check-in, and interact with other users. The StadiumVision Mobile technology provides a nearly seamless stream of action to your phone at only a two second delay.”

(via trendd)

Steve Mann: My “Augmediated” Life - IEEE Spectrum

Steve Mann, a professor in the department of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Toronto, has been designing and wearing computerized eyewear for decades, the gear increasing markedly in sophistication over time.

Steve Mann: My “Augmediated” Life - IEEE Spectrum

Steve Mann, a professor in the department of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Toronto, has been designing and wearing computerized eyewear for decades, the gear increasing markedly in sophistication over time.

In China, virtual reality stores turn open spaces into a supermarket
Innovations like Prague’s QR code grocery store located in subway stations around the city have already shown how the online shopping world can still maintain a presence in public spaces. In China, e-commerce site Yihaodian is now launching its augmented reality stores, which give customers the impression of a physical store while they browse online. READ MORE…

In China, virtual reality stores turn open spaces into a supermarket

Innovations like Prague’s QR code grocery store located in subway stations around the city have already shown how the online shopping world can still maintain a presence in public spaces. In China, e-commerce site Yihaodian is now launching its augmented reality stores, which give customers the impression of a physical store while they browse online. READ MORE…

Innovega to demonstrate contact lens display today at CES.
I covered the Innovega contact lens here after they revealed details of the product at CES last year. Now the company has announced that a working version of the HUD contact lens will be shown at CES from today.

From January 8th to 11th, Innovega will demonstrate eyewear that offers a clear and simultaneous view of a wearer’s rich media and of their immediate surroundings”.
The Innovega iOptik™ video eyewear is transparent and its ‘virtual canvas’ on which digital content is placed, is the largest anticipated in the industry. Compared to a conventional 42 inch flat-panel television that consumers buy for their living rooms, Innovega’s mobile eyewear accessory will deliver the equivalent of a 240 inch, HD, 3D experience.

Innovega to demonstrate contact lens display today at CES.

I covered the Innovega contact lens here after they revealed details of the product at CES last year. Now the company has announced that a working version of the HUD contact lens will be shown at CES from today.

From January 8th to 11th, Innovega will demonstrate eyewear that offers a clear and simultaneous view of a wearer’s rich media and of their immediate surroundings”.

The Innovega iOptik™ video eyewear is transparent and its ‘virtual canvas’ on which digital content is placed, is the largest anticipated in the industry. Compared to a conventional 42 inch flat-panel television that consumers buy for their living rooms, Innovega’s mobile eyewear accessory will deliver the equivalent of a 240 inch, HD, 3D experience.

New DARPA RFP Calls for All-In-One HUD that Sees Through Smoke, In The Dark and In Broad Daylight
DARPA wants a multi-band head-up display, which could be mounted to a helmet or a weapon scope, that combines several wavelengths of light into one image.
Sunny? No problem—the camera can see in visible light. Smoke bomb blocking your view? No sweat; the camera can see thermal infrared signatures. The system would also have near-infrared capability to help users see through darkness.
A new DARPA project called the Pixel Network for Dynamic Visualization (PIXNET) seeks proposals for new sensors that can do all of this in one package. A successful proposal would be small, lightweight, low-power and low-cost, said Nibir Dhar, DARPA program manager for PIXNET.
The system would communicate wirelessly with Android-based smart phones to fuse the images together, like you can see in the inset above. The warfighter would see a scene with visible imagery, thermal sensitivity and near-IR capability all in one.
Existing sensors are a good starting point, but they’re not advanced enough to combine multiple functions the way DARPA wants. Combining reflective and thermal bands will be a challenge, not to mention making it ultra-portable. “What we really need are breakthroughs in aperture design, focal plane arrays, electronics, packaging and materials science,” Dhar said.
(via DARPA Wants Cheap Head-Up Displays That Work In Any Kind Of Light | Popular Science)

New DARPA RFP Calls for All-In-One HUD that Sees Through Smoke, In The Dark and In Broad Daylight

DARPA wants a multi-band head-up display, which could be mounted to a helmet or a weapon scope, that combines several wavelengths of light into one image.

Sunny? No problem—the camera can see in visible light. Smoke bomb blocking your view? No sweat; the camera can see thermal infrared signatures. The system would also have near-infrared capability to help users see through darkness.

A new DARPA project called the Pixel Network for Dynamic Visualization (PIXNET) seeks proposals for new sensors that can do all of this in one package. A successful proposal would be small, lightweight, low-power and low-cost, said Nibir Dhar, DARPA program manager for PIXNET.

The system would communicate wirelessly with Android-based smart phones to fuse the images together, like you can see in the inset above. The warfighter would see a scene with visible imagery, thermal sensitivity and near-IR capability all in one.

Existing sensors are a good starting point, but they’re not advanced enough to combine multiple functions the way DARPA wants. Combining reflective and thermal bands will be a challenge, not to mention making it ultra-portable. “What we really need are breakthroughs in aperture design, focal plane arrays, electronics, packaging and materials science,” Dhar said.

(via DARPA Wants Cheap Head-Up Displays That Work In Any Kind Of Light | Popular Science)

(via joshbyard)

Pioneer shows off augmented reality device for cars
Pioneer, a Japanese maker of automotive navigation systems, was in attendance at the CEATEC 2012 event in Japan where it showcased its use of augmented reality in a heads up display for a car. The company has extensive experience in the realm of augmented reality and vehicles and believes that the technology could unlock a new generation of navigation devices for the auto industry. Automakers too have shown interest in augmented reality, adding momentum to Pioneer’s efforts.

Pioneer shows off augmented reality device for cars

Pioneer, a Japanese maker of automotive navigation systems, was in attendance at the CEATEC 2012 event in Japan where it showcased its use of augmented reality in a heads up display for a car. The company has extensive experience in the realm of augmented reality and vehicles and believes that the technology could unlock a new generation of navigation devices for the auto industry. Automakers too have shown interest in augmented reality, adding momentum to Pioneer’s efforts.