Shared mobility in Paris - The Networked Society Blog

Would you give up your car and instead subscribe to a car sharing service? I got this question a few months ago from a friend living in Paris. My initial reaction was no. I like the fact that my car is my own and that it is accessible where, and when, I want it. But then I listened to my friend’s hands-on experience with car sharing.

The service he is using is called Autolib, an electric-car sharing scheme that has been operating in Paris for about a year. It simplifies his life and he absolutely loves it. There is always a car available fairly close-by and there are no more stressful, endless searches for available parking spots, as Autolib has plenty of dedicated parking spaces with charging poles. Most surprising is, perhaps, his claim that the cars are always left clean by prior users. Last week-end I was in Paris and could see people getting in and out of the shared cars. The few vehicles I peeked into were, indeed, neat and tidy.

Shared mobility in Paris - The Networked Society Blog

Would you give up your car and instead subscribe to a car sharing service? I got this question a few months ago from a friend living in Paris. My initial reaction was no. I like the fact that my car is my own and that it is accessible where, and when, I want it. But then I listened to my friend’s hands-on experience with car sharing.

The service he is using is called Autolib, an electric-car sharing scheme that has been operating in Paris for about a year. It simplifies his life and he absolutely loves it. There is always a car available fairly close-by and there are no more stressful, endless searches for available parking spots, as Autolib has plenty of dedicated parking spaces with charging poles. Most surprising is, perhaps, his claim that the cars are always left clean by prior users.
Last week-end I was in Paris and could see people getting in and out of the shared cars. The few vehicles I peeked into were, indeed, neat and tidy.

Paris launches world-first electric car-share scheme | Physorg.com
A Bluecar is pictured in Paris, on the first day of a  test session of the Autolib electric car pick-up service. Self-service  electric cars appeared on the streets of Paris Sunday, as a French group  launched a public car-hire scheme modelled on the capital’s popular  bicycle-sharing system and designed to become the world’s largest of its  kind.
Self-service electric cars appeared on the streets of  Paris Sunday, as a French group launched a public car-hire scheme  modelled on the capital’s popular bicycle-sharing system and designed to  become the world’s largest of its kind.

Paris launches world-first electric car-share scheme | Physorg.com

A Bluecar is pictured in Paris, on the first day of a test session of the Autolib electric car pick-up service. Self-service electric cars appeared on the streets of Paris Sunday, as a French group launched a public car-hire scheme modelled on the capital’s popular bicycle-sharing system and designed to become the world’s largest of its kind.

Self-service electric cars appeared on the streets of Paris Sunday, as a French group launched a public car-hire scheme modelled on the capital’s popular bicycle-sharing system and designed to become the world’s largest of its kind.

 Paris to Launch the World’s First Municipal Electric Vehicle Hire Scheme | This Big City
Parisians will soon be zipping round Charles de Gaulle Etoile in  little blue bubble-like cars, as the world’s first municipal electric  vehicle (EV) hire scheme gets underway. Mayor Bernard Delanoë has  pioneered the €110 million Autolib initiative to complement the Vélib bicycles, introduced in 2007. The fleet of 3,000 lithium battery-powered cars is designed by Italian partner Pininfarina, best known for their work on desirable brands like Alfa Romeo and Ferrari. Manufactured by French company Bolloré, they will be available later this year from 1,000 self-service hire points throughout the city.
The four-seater ‘Bluecars’ will be able to travel about 250km on one  charge, with a full recharge taking around four hours. They’re designed  for efficiency rather than pace: a top speed of 130km/h won’t thrill  Jeremy Clarkson. But for people simply wanting a straightforward car to  hop across town in, they could be ideal. They come equipped with GPS and  an emergency call button in case of an accident.
Subscription to the scheme costs just €12 a month, with additional  charges of €5 for the first half an hour of use, €4 for the next, and €6  for each subsequent 30-minute slot. The charging rates are clearly  designed to favour single, short-ish trips, rather than compete with  mainstream car hire schemes. Bluecar needs to attract just 160,000  subscribers to cover its costs, an achievable feat in a city where 58%  of the population do not own a car, and 16% of those who do use it less  than once a month.

 Paris to Launch the World’s First Municipal Electric Vehicle Hire Scheme | This Big City

Parisians will soon be zipping round Charles de Gaulle Etoile in little blue bubble-like cars, as the world’s first municipal electric vehicle (EV) hire scheme gets underway. Mayor Bernard Delanoë has pioneered the €110 million Autolib initiative to complement the Vélib bicycles, introduced in 2007. The fleet of 3,000 lithium battery-powered cars is designed by Italian partner Pininfarina, best known for their work on desirable brands like Alfa Romeo and Ferrari. Manufactured by French company Bolloré, they will be available later this year from 1,000 self-service hire points throughout the city.

The four-seater ‘Bluecars’ will be able to travel about 250km on one charge, with a full recharge taking around four hours. They’re designed for efficiency rather than pace: a top speed of 130km/h won’t thrill Jeremy Clarkson. But for people simply wanting a straightforward car to hop across town in, they could be ideal. They come equipped with GPS and an emergency call button in case of an accident.

Subscription to the scheme costs just €12 a month, with additional charges of €5 for the first half an hour of use, €4 for the next, and €6 for each subsequent 30-minute slot. The charging rates are clearly designed to favour single, short-ish trips, rather than compete with mainstream car hire schemes. Bluecar needs to attract just 160,000 subscribers to cover its costs, an achievable feat in a city where 58% of the population do not own a car, and 16% of those who do use it less than once a month.