Sequoia is the new world’s fastest supercomputer at 16 petaflops | KurzweilAI
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)’s IBM Blue Gene/Q Sequoia supercomputer is the new world’s fastest high-performance computing system, at 16.32 sustained petaflops (quadrillion floating point operations per second), according to the Top500 list of the world’s fastest supercomputers.
For the first time since November 2009, a U.S. supercomputer tops the ranking.
A 96-rack system, Sequoia will enable simulations that explore phenomena at a level of detail never before possible. Sequoia is dedicated to to the The National Nuclear Security Administration’s (NNSA) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program for stewardship of the nation’s nuclear weapons stockpile, a joint effort by Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos and Sandia national laboratories.

Sequoia is the new world’s fastest supercomputer at 16 petaflops | KurzweilAI

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)’s IBM Blue Gene/Q Sequoia supercomputer is the new world’s fastest high-performance computing system, at 16.32 sustained petaflops (quadrillion floating point operations per second), according to the Top500 list of the world’s fastest supercomputers.

For the first time since November 2009, a U.S. supercomputer tops the ranking.

A 96-rack system, Sequoia will enable simulations that explore phenomena at a level of detail never before possible. Sequoia is dedicated to to the The National Nuclear Security Administration’s (NNSA) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program for stewardship of the nation’s nuclear weapons stockpile, a joint effort by Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos and Sandia national laboratories.

High Performance Computing: The New Imperative is Economic Development and Jobs « A Smarter Planet Blog
Manish Parashar Professor of electrical and computer engineering Rutgers University
For years, universities have worked with businesses to produce joint research and educational programs. But these days there’s a new imperative: we must create collaborations aimed at producing economic development and jobs. At Rutgers, we see these sorts of public-private partnerships not only as a tremendous opportunity for our students and faculty, but as critical resource for New Jersey.
Rutgers announced just such and effort today at a small celebration on the university’s Busch Campus in Piscataway. We’re working with IBM to create a new high-performance computing center, Rutgers Discovery Informatics Institute (RDI2), focused on the application of “Big Data” analytics in life sciences, finance, and other industries.  The goal is to improve the economic competitiveness of New Jersey’s public and private research institutions.
The centerpiece is a IBM Blue Gene®/P supercomputer that we’ve named “Excalibur,” playing off our sports mascot, the Scarlet Knight. In addition to gaining access to the hardware and an impressive array of software and technical support, Rutgers faculty members and graduate students and technical people from New Jersey companies will be able to work with IBM scientists and engineers on joint research projects.

High Performance Computing: The New Imperative is Economic Development and Jobs « A Smarter Planet Blog

Manish Parashar
Professor of electrical and computer engineering
Rutgers University

For years, universities have worked with businesses to produce joint research and educational programs. But these days there’s a new imperative: we must create collaborations aimed at producing economic development and jobs. At Rutgers, we see these sorts of public-private partnerships not only as a tremendous opportunity for our students and faculty, but as critical resource for New Jersey.

Rutgers announced just such and effort today at a small celebration on the university’s Busch Campus in Piscataway. We’re working with IBM to create a new high-performance computing center, Rutgers Discovery Informatics Institute (RDI2), focused on the application of “Big Data” analytics in life sciences, finance, and other industries.  The goal is to improve the economic competitiveness of New Jersey’s public and private research institutions.

The centerpiece is a IBM Blue Gene®/P supercomputer that we’ve named “Excalibur,” playing off our sports mascot, the Scarlet Knight. In addition to gaining access to the hardware and an impressive array of software and technical support, Rutgers faculty members and graduate students and technical people from New Jersey companies will be able to work with IBM scientists and engineers on joint research projects.

Technology Review: Supercomputer Visuals Without Graphics Chips
Computer scientists are visualizing the world’s most gigantic datasets without graphics clusters.
Core collapse: This image—step 1492 of a simulation of a core-collapse supernova—was generated on Argonne National Laboratory’s super computer, Intrepid, without the use of a graphics cluster.  Credit: Argonne National Laboratory

Technology Review: Supercomputer Visuals Without Graphics Chips

Computer scientists are visualizing the world’s most gigantic datasets without graphics clusters.

Core collapse: This image—step 1492 of a simulation of a core-collapse supernova—was generated on Argonne National Laboratory’s super computer, Intrepid, without the use of a graphics cluster.
Credit: Argonne National Laboratory