“Confessions of a Chevy Volt Owner.” A surprising, frank interview with an owner of a Volt after one year of driving.
203 miles per gallon in the first year at 16,000 miles. Not a typo. His previous car, a Volvo, got 18 miles per gallon. (I get about 28 mpg in my ol’ benz.)
“I wish I bought the car. I absolutely love it.” He leased it because he was skeptical of owning it. But, wishes he bought it.
“I didn’t buy it to save money.” The biggest surprise here. He bought it to help eliminate the need for oil.
“My home electricity bill is about the same as when my daughter lived here in high school.” After a year of plugging it in to his home, his electricity bill remains the same and didn’t go up as expected.
He responds to the common criticism, “The Chevy Cruze is cheaper.” “Well, a bicycle is even cheaper and saves more gas than the Cruze. So is a used car. So is walking. Look, this isn’t about money, it’s about oil.”

The interview is short and surprising. Have a look.

via climateadaptation:

“Confessions of a Chevy Volt Owner.” A surprising, frank interview with an owner of a Volt after one year of driving.

  • 203 miles per gallon in the first year at 16,000 miles. Not a typo. His previous car, a Volvo, got 18 miles per gallon. (I get about 28 mpg in my ol’ benz.)
  • “I wish I bought the car. I absolutely love it.” He leased it because he was skeptical of owning it. But, wishes he bought it.
  • “I didn’t buy it to save money.” The biggest surprise here. He bought it to help eliminate the need for oil.
  • “My home electricity bill is about the same as when my daughter lived here in high school.” After a year of plugging it in to his home, his electricity bill remains the same and didn’t go up as expected.
  • He responds to the common criticism, “The Chevy Cruze is cheaper.” “Well, a bicycle is even cheaper and saves more gas than the Cruze. So is a used car. So is walking. Look, this isn’t about money, it’s about oil.”

The interview is short and surprising. Have a look.

via climateadaptation:

(via climateadaptation)

IBM tells story of the Chevy Volt’s complex engineering
The Chevrolet Volt is a  prime example of the need for unified methods to address the complexity  and software content in embedded system design, according to Meg Selfe,  vice president for complex and embedded systems at IBM Rational.  Selfe’s keynote speech at the Embedded Systems Conference focused on the  design and engineering behind Chevy’s breakthrough plug-in vehicle. According to EE Times, Selfe talked of IBM’s role in helping streamline General Motors'  design process. Due to this streamlining, the Volt went from a showy  concept to a production vehicle in just 29 months, compared to the  60-month design cycle of most automobiles. As Selfe stated:
They focused on time to market, and they had to because it was a  life or death moment for them. They were in a near-death experience, so  they brought together their best thousand engineers. They were changing  the way in which they did engineering.
Specifically, GM streamlined the Volt engineering team’s tools and  processes and, according to Selfe, “it was like a battle of the tools.”  In the end, says Selfe, The General “put more of the design in-house,”  which was a risk that paid off.
Source: Autoblog

IBM tells story of the Chevy Volt’s complex engineering

The Chevrolet Volt is a prime example of the need for unified methods to address the complexity and software content in embedded system design, according to Meg Selfe, vice president for complex and embedded systems at IBM Rational. Selfe’s keynote speech at the Embedded Systems Conference focused on the design and engineering behind Chevy’s breakthrough plug-in vehicle.

According to EE Times, Selfe talked of IBM’s role in helping streamline General Motors' design process. Due to this streamlining, the Volt went from a showy concept to a production vehicle in just 29 months, compared to the 60-month design cycle of most automobiles. As Selfe stated:

They focused on time to market, and they had to because it was a life or death moment for them. They were in a near-death experience, so they brought together their best thousand engineers. They were changing the way in which they did engineering.

Specifically, GM streamlined the Volt engineering team’s tools and processes and, according to Selfe, “it was like a battle of the tools.” In the end, says Selfe, The General “put more of the design in-house,” which was a risk that paid off.

Source: Autoblog