In China, taxi passengers bid tips to secure a ride home
Booking a taxi can be an arduous process – cars may not be available, and if they are operators may drive a hard bargain, especially at busy times. While frequent cab users can take advantage of Taxmobil‘s monthly subscription service, those who wanting to use their spending power to ensure a ride home can now take advantage of China’s Didi Dache app, which gets passengers to bid a higher tip to increase the likelihood of securing a cab. READ MORE…

In China, taxi passengers bid tips to secure a ride home

Booking a taxi can be an arduous process – cars may not be available, and if they are operators may drive a hard bargain, especially at busy times. While frequent cab users can take advantage of Taxmobil‘s monthly subscription service, those who wanting to use their spending power to ensure a ride home can now take advantage of China’s Didi Dache app, which gets passengers to bid a higher tip to increase the likelihood of securing a cab. READ MORE…

China’s push to install more wind energy capacity has started paying off. Data from the China Wind Energy Association (CWEA) revealed that in 2012, wind energy overtook nuclear power for the very first time to become the country’s third largest source of electricity. The leading two are coal and hydro-electric power. Since 2007, electricity generation through nuclear power has risen by approximately ten percent annually. In comparison, the development of wind energy has grown by an astonishing 80 percent per year. Wind farms across China produced 100.4 terawatt hours of electricity in 2012 – that represents two percent more than that generated by nuclear power. Ambitious renewable energy targets have spurred the growth of China’s wind energy initiative, and the gap with nuclear power is expected to widen significantly over the coming years.

In China, virtual reality stores turn open spaces into a supermarket
Innovations like Prague’s QR code grocery store located in subway stations around the city have already shown how the online shopping world can still maintain a presence in public spaces. In China, e-commerce site Yihaodian is now launching its augmented reality stores, which give customers the impression of a physical store while they browse online. READ MORE…

In China, virtual reality stores turn open spaces into a supermarket

Innovations like Prague’s QR code grocery store located in subway stations around the city have already shown how the online shopping world can still maintain a presence in public spaces. In China, e-commerce site Yihaodian is now launching its augmented reality stores, which give customers the impression of a physical store while they browse online. READ MORE…

'Smart' cities aim to predict — and manage — traffic future | Greenbang
The “internet of things,” as the smart grid is often called, entails  making our lives, homes and cities more efficient by connecting all the  pieces with networking technology and applying advanced strategies like  “big data” analytics to better understand how all the pieces interact.
The analogy to the computing internet, though, isn’t entirely  applicable. For one, the internet of things is aimed not only at making  our systems work better and smarter, but to actually help predict the  future.
Consider that bane of metropolitan motorists everywhere, for example:  the city traffic jam. Where the traditional response has been to build  new roads, expand mass transit or institute congestion pricing, smart  technology aims to help predict bottlenecks before they occur and manage  traffic accordingly to prevent jams.
Look at what IBM is currently doing in the Chinese city of Zhenjiang.  Using its Intelligent Operations Center for Smarter Cities, Big Blue  aims to help the city of three million use analytics to not only enable real-time bus monitoring and management, but to simulate traffic flow patterns ahead of time.  By anticipating traffic problems before they happen, IBM’s Intelligent  Transportation technology is designed to improve the city’s public  transit system and “increase traffic throughput” … in other words, make  it possible for more traffic to flow through streets without the need to  build more roads or otherwise radically change the existing  infrastructure.
“(W)e will make our public transportation system faster and more  efficient, while making our city a better place to live in,” said  Mingnian Yin, director of Zhenjiang’s Reform Commission.

'Smart' cities aim to predict — and manage — traffic future | Greenbang

The “internet of things,” as the smart grid is often called, entails making our lives, homes and cities more efficient by connecting all the pieces with networking technology and applying advanced strategies like “big data” analytics to better understand how all the pieces interact.

The analogy to the computing internet, though, isn’t entirely applicable. For one, the internet of things is aimed not only at making our systems work better and smarter, but to actually help predict the future.

Consider that bane of metropolitan motorists everywhere, for example: the city traffic jam. Where the traditional response has been to build new roads, expand mass transit or institute congestion pricing, smart technology aims to help predict bottlenecks before they occur and manage traffic accordingly to prevent jams.

Look at what IBM is currently doing in the Chinese city of Zhenjiang. Using its Intelligent Operations Center for Smarter Cities, Big Blue aims to help the city of three million use analytics to not only enable real-time bus monitoring and management, but to simulate traffic flow patterns ahead of time. By anticipating traffic problems before they happen, IBM’s Intelligent Transportation technology is designed to improve the city’s public transit system and “increase traffic throughput” … in other words, make it possible for more traffic to flow through streets without the need to build more roads or otherwise radically change the existing infrastructure.

“(W)e will make our public transportation system faster and more efficient, while making our city a better place to live in,” said Mingnian Yin, director of Zhenjiang’s Reform Commission.

Chinese team develop fuel cell that can clean water as it generates electricity | Physorg.com
Yanbiao Liu and his colleagues from Shanghai Jiao Tong  University, have succeeded in building a device capable of both cleaning  wastewater and producing electricity from it. Using light as an energy  source the team created a photo-catalytic fuel cell that used a titanium  dioxide nanotube-array anode and a cathode based on platinum. The light  energy degrades the organic material found in the wastewater and in the  process generates electrons which pass through the cathode converting  it into electricity. The team has published its results on Water Science & Technology.

Chinese team develop fuel cell that can clean water as it generates electricity | Physorg.com

Yanbiao Liu and his colleagues from Shanghai Jiao Tong University, have succeeded in building a device capable of both cleaning wastewater and producing electricity from it. Using light as an energy source the team created a photo-catalytic fuel cell that used a titanium dioxide nanotube-array anode and a cathode based on platinum. The light energy degrades the organic material found in the wastewater and in the process generates electrons which pass through the cathode converting it into electricity. The team has published its results on Water Science & Technology.

The Biggest, Baddest Bike-Share in the World: Hangzhou China from Streetfilms on Vimeo.

The biggest, baddest bikeshare system in the world: Hangzhou, China | Grist

A couple of weeks ago, I rode the Capital Bikeshare system in Washington, D.C., and I was some impressed. With 1,100 bikes, it’s currently the biggest in the nation, and it makes getting around Washington much easier than it has ever been before.

But the bikeshare in Hangzhou, China, a city of 6.77 million, blows anything in Europe, Canada, or the U.S. out of the water. Streetfilms went there recently to document the situation.

It’s got 50,000 bikes at 2,050 stations around the city. People make an average of 240,000 trips a day on the bikes, which are completely integrated into the rest of the public transit system. By 2020, the plan is to have 175,000 bikes available for use.

The bikeshare boom in China has happened in spite of the rapid onset of car culture in the last 10-15 years. According to Bradley Schroeder of the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy, “Now leaders are realizing that it’s absolutely impossible to build enough roads for everyone to have a car.” It’s only natural to return to the bike culture that was so prevalent in the country for so long as a solution. Watch.

Sarah Goodyear is Grist’s cities editor. She’s also on Twitter.

IBM Global Entrepreneur | SmartCamp 2011 Events

Looking for global entrepreneurs who want to build a smarter planet

SmartCamp is an exclusive event aimed at identifying early stage entrepreneurs who are developing business ventures that align with our IBM Smarter Planet vision.

These mentoring and networking events put entrepreneurs in touch with investment firms, serial entrepreneurs, academics, marketing, communications, and technology experts that can help accelerate the solutions of startup companies to market.

SmartCamp events in 2011

THE SUPERSTAR: Self-Sustaining City of the Future
Source: Inhabitat
Beijing based MAD Architects has a new concept for a traveling and  self-sufficient city. The traveling city will produce its own power and  food while recycling its own waste. Their is still doubt whether the  project will come to fruition but a model is planned for the 11th annual  Venice Bienalle.

THE SUPERSTAR: Self-Sustaining City of the Future

Source: Inhabitat

Beijing based MAD Architects has a new concept for a traveling and self-sufficient city. The traveling city will produce its own power and food while recycling its own waste. Their is still doubt whether the project will come to fruition but a model is planned for the 11th annual Venice Bienalle.

smartercities:

Chinese Traffic Jam Extends 60 Miles and Nine Days | Inhabitat - Green Design Will Save the World
If ever there were a case for the importance of good urban planning that includes mass transit, this is it: a 62-mile traffic standstill on a road leading to Beijing is now in its ninth day, with individual drivers caught in it for as long as three days. The cause of the jam — beyond the skyrocketing number of drivers in China — is heavy use of the route, the Beijing-Tibet expressway, by trucks bringing construction supplies into Beijing. The trucks don’t just add to traffic; they also damage the road, necessitating repair crews.

smartercities:

Chinese Traffic Jam Extends 60 Miles and Nine Days | Inhabitat - Green Design Will Save the World

If ever there were a case for the importance of good urban planning that includes mass transit, this is it: a 62-mile traffic standstill on a road leading to Beijing is now in its ninth day, with individual drivers caught in it for as long as three days. The cause of the jam — beyond the skyrocketing number of drivers in China — is heavy use of the route, the Beijing-Tibet expressway, by trucks bringing construction supplies into Beijing. The trucks don’t just add to traffic; they also damage the road, necessitating repair crews.

China Pours Billions Into Electric Cars, Hybrids | Fast Company
China, that contradictory land of coal, smog, and renewable energy, may be on the verge of leadership in another green technology sector: electric and hybrid vehicles. The Chinese government announced today a plan to invest up to $15 billion in a state-run venture that will research, develop, and generate standards for upcoming hybrids and EVs. The venture will also put millions of electric cars on the road in the coming years, according to the New York Times.

China Pours Billions Into Electric Cars, Hybrids | Fast Company

China, that contradictory land of coal, smog, and renewable energy, may be on the verge of leadership in another green technology sector: electric and hybrid vehicles. The Chinese government announced today a plan to invest up to $15 billion in a state-run venture that will research, develop, and generate standards for upcoming hybrids and EVs. The venture will also put millions of electric cars on the road in the coming years, according to the New York Times.