In Colombia, world’s first crowdfunded skyscraper offers investors a share in profits
Citizens don’t often get a say in the major building developments that populate their city, mostly because they are usually funded by wealthy architects or investors. However, we recently saw residents in Copenhagen called upon to determine the construction of a new bridge through crowdfunding, and now the BD Bacatá project in Colombia aims to hand over power to the future inhabitants of a skyscraper by getting them to invest in its development. READ MORE…

In Colombia, world’s first crowdfunded skyscraper offers investors a share in profits

Citizens don’t often get a say in the major building developments that populate their city, mostly because they are usually funded by wealthy architects or investors. However, we recently saw residents in Copenhagen called upon to determine the construction of a new bridge through crowdfunding, and now the BD Bacatá project in Colombia aims to hand over power to the future inhabitants of a skyscraper by getting them to invest in its development. READ MORE…

I.B.M. Announces Brainy Computer Chip - NYTimes.com
Dharmendra Modha, an I.B.M. researcher, is the leader of the project to create cognitive computer chips.
Since the early days in the 1940s, computers have routinely been described as “brains” — giant brains or mathematical brains or electronic brains. Scientists and engineers often cringed at the distorting simplification, but the popular label stuck.
 
Wait long enough, it seems, and science catches up with the metaphor. The field of “cognitive computing” is making enough progress that the brain analogy is becoming more apt. I.B.M. researchers are announcing on Thursday two working prototype cognitive computer chips.
The chip designs are the result of a three-year project involving I.B.M. and university researchers, supported by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. The academic collaborators are at Columbia University, Cornell University, the University of California, Merced and the University of Wisconsin.
The results to date have been sufficiently encouraging that Darpa is announcing on Thursday that it will commit an additional $21 million to the project, the third round of government funding, which brings the total to $41 million.
The cognitive chips are massively parallel microprocessors that consume very little power. But they also have a fundamentally different design. The two prototype semiconductor cores each has 256 neuronlike nodes. One core is linked to 262,144 synapselike memory modules, while the other is linked to 65,536 such memory synapses.

I.B.M. Announces Brainy Computer Chip - NYTimes.com

Dharmendra Modha, an I.B.M. researcher, is the leader of the project to create cognitive computer chips.

Since the early days in the 1940s, computers have routinely been described as “brains” — giant brains or mathematical brains or electronic brains. Scientists and engineers often cringed at the distorting simplification, but the popular label stuck.

Wait long enough, it seems, and science catches up with the metaphor. The field of “cognitive computing” is making enough progress that the brain analogy is becoming more apt. I.B.M. researchers are announcing on Thursday two working prototype cognitive computer chips.

The chip designs are the result of a three-year project involving I.B.M. and university researchers, supported by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. The academic collaborators are at Columbia University, Cornell University, the University of California, Merced and the University of Wisconsin.

The results to date have been sufficiently encouraging that Darpa is announcing on Thursday that it will commit an additional $21 million to the project, the third round of government funding, which brings the total to $41 million.

The cognitive chips are massively parallel microprocessors that consume very little power. But they also have a fundamentally different design. The two prototype semiconductor cores each has 256 neuronlike nodes. One core is linked to 262,144 synapselike memory modules, while the other is linked to 65,536 such memory synapses.

IBM and Columbia Univ. Prepare Students for Green Job Market

An increasing number of businesses, communities and governments around the world are undertaking transformation projects to make aging infrastructures such as buildings, electricity grids and transportation systems more sustainable. To ensure students have the right skills to take on these challenges, the Center for Technology, Innovation and Community Engagement (CTICE), part of Columbias Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS), and IBM (NYSE:IBM) are launching a new joint initiative to provide technology resources to college students that will prepare them for the emerging green economy

(via jgluckibm)

Columbia  and IBM Launch Green Tech Skills Initiative - ReadWriteStart
The Smarter Cities Initiatives opens IBM’s global resources to Columbia faculty and students, including access to the 40 IBM Innovation Centers worldwide. The intiative builds upon Columbia’s existing research efforts on sustainability issues, spanning several academic disciplines including business, law and engineering. The initiative will provide students with free access to:
 IBM software, both on campus and in the cloud, to develop software for sustainability and green projects 
Technical support for green technology courses that show students how to build energy efficient IT infrastructure for smart buildings, smart grids and smart water systems 
Energy efficiency and open standards software development tools on IBM developerWorks 
 100,000 global business partners and academic communities through 40 IBM Innovation Centers in 30 countries 

Columbia and IBM Launch Green Tech Skills Initiative - ReadWriteStart

The Smarter Cities Initiatives opens IBM’s global resources to Columbia faculty and students, including access to the 40 IBM Innovation Centers worldwide. The intiative builds upon Columbia’s existing research efforts on sustainability issues, spanning several academic disciplines including business, law and engineering. The initiative will provide students with free access to:

  • IBM software, both on campus and in the cloud, to develop software for sustainability and green projects
  • Technical support for green technology courses that show students how to build energy efficient IT infrastructure for smart buildings, smart grids and smart water systems
  • Energy efficiency and open standards software development tools on IBM developerWorks
  •  100,000 global business partners and academic communities through 40 IBM Innovation Centers in 30 countries