Cambridge Consultants develops indoor tech to pick up where GPS drops off
Indoor navigation isn’t a new concept, but it often requires wireless signals or custom infrastructure, neither of which are entirely reliable. Cambridge Consultants has come up with an as-yet-unnamed technology that purports to solve the issue by utilizing low-power sensors along with a custom formula that don’t require an existing framework. According to the Cambridge, UK-based company, all you need are its special Bayesian algorithm and run-of-the-mill smartphone components like accelerometers, gyroscopes and magnetometers to do the job. It has already built a concept chipset (seen above) that could be embedded in existing devices — you can either map your location directly on it or send that info off to a remote system. The firm says the technology will be useful for firefighters and hospital workers, though we wouldn’t complain if it’s implemented in trade shows either. For more information on the tech, check the press release after the break.

Cambridge Consultants develops indoor tech to pick up where GPS drops off

Indoor navigation isn’t a new concept, but it often requires wireless signals or custom infrastructure, neither of which are entirely reliable. Cambridge Consultants has come up with an as-yet-unnamed technology that purports to solve the issue by utilizing low-power sensors along with a custom formula that don’t require an existing framework. According to the Cambridge, UK-based company, all you need are its special Bayesian algorithm and run-of-the-mill smartphone components like accelerometers, gyroscopes and magnetometers to do the job. It has already built a concept chipset (seen above) that could be embedded in existing devices — you can either map your location directly on it or send that info off to a remote system. The firm says the technology will be useful for firefighters and hospital workers, though we wouldn’t complain if it’s implemented in trade shows either. For more information on the tech, check the press release after the break.

Can GPS Trackers Help Stop Prescription Painkiller Theft? | Fast Company
NYPD Commissioner Ray Kelly hopes tricked-out fake bottles will lead to popping illicit pill poppers.
Police in New York City are planning to use fake prescription painkiller pill bottles with GPS trackers to try to curb the theft of highly addictive prescription pills, police commissioner Ray Kellyreportedly outlined yesterday in a speech at Bill Clinton’s Foundation’s conference on health issues in La Quinta, Calif.
Under the plan, which has been adopted by a few police departments across the country, police would ask pharmacies to store the fake bottles among the real prescription pills. When one is stolen (or removed from its home), it will emit a special signal that will allow police to track it.

Can GPS Trackers Help Stop Prescription Painkiller Theft? | Fast Company

NYPD Commissioner Ray Kelly hopes tricked-out fake bottles will lead to popping illicit pill poppers.

Police in New York City are planning to use fake prescription painkiller pill bottles with GPS trackers to try to curb the theft of highly addictive prescription pills, police commissioner Ray Kellyreportedly outlined yesterday in a speech at Bill Clinton’s Foundation’s conference on health issues in La Quinta, Calif.

Under the plan, which has been adopted by a few police departments across the country, police would ask pharmacies to store the fake bottles among the real prescription pills. When one is stolen (or removed from its home), it will emit a special signal that will allow police to track it.

GPS Receivers Now Small Enough to Attach to Literally Anything - Technology Review
With a tiny-enough GPS sensor, it’s possible to track the location of  anything from your lost keys to a runaway pet. That’s because the world’s smallest GPS receiver is now smaller than a penny and weighs only 0.3 grams.  But that’s just the chip — what about all the electronics required to  make it truly useful, like a system for remotely downloading the data it  has logged?
This GPS logger weighs 10 grams, most of which is battery. Custom-made by Telemetry Solutions of Concord, California, it’s small enough to attach to a fruit bat for research purposes. Data can be downloaded directly from the chip upon recapture, or it can be downloaded wirelessly from up to 500 meters away.

GPS Receivers Now Small Enough to Attach to Literally Anything - Technology Review

With a tiny-enough GPS sensor, it’s possible to track the location of anything from your lost keys to a runaway pet. That’s because the world’s smallest GPS receiver is now smaller than a penny and weighs only 0.3 grams. But that’s just the chip — what about all the electronics required to make it truly useful, like a system for remotely downloading the data it has logged?

This GPS logger weighs 10 grams, most of which is battery. Custom-made by Telemetry Solutions of Concord, California, it’s small enough to attach to a fruit bat for research purposes. Data can be downloaded directly from the chip upon recapture, or it can be downloaded wirelessly from up to 500 meters away.

Toucans With GPS Backpacks Help Biologists Study Tropical Forest | Wired Science | Wired.com
Toucans outfitted with GPS backpacks are helping researchers track the spread of seeds in tropical forests.
The nutmeg-loving toucan unwittingly plants new trees by gulping whole seeds, processing the soft outer pulp in its crop, and spitting out the hard inner seed. But researchers could only guess how far the seeds would drop from a parent tree.
So conservation biologists from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute netted six toucans from a rainforest near Gamboa, Panama, and strapped on lightweight backpacks containing a GPS tracker and an accelerometer. The backpacks recorded location and activity level, and were designed to fall off after 10 days.

Toucans With GPS Backpacks Help Biologists Study Tropical Forest | Wired Science | Wired.com

Toucans outfitted with GPS backpacks are helping researchers track the spread of seeds in tropical forests.

The nutmeg-loving toucan unwittingly plants new trees by gulping whole seeds, processing the soft outer pulp in its crop, and spitting out the hard inner seed. But researchers could only guess how far the seeds would drop from a parent tree.

So conservation biologists from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute netted six toucans from a rainforest near Gamboa, Panama, and strapped on lightweight backpacks containing a GPS tracker and an accelerometer. The backpacks recorded location and activity level, and were designed to fall off after 10 days.

IBM Training Computers To Predict Traffic
Traffic websites, with their color-coded maps of clogged streets and  freeways, are good at telling commuters when congestion is already  awful. But what if they could know not only where you drive, but if the  route is going to be bad today, and warned you ahead of time?
A team of researchers at IBM Corp. are working on a system that would do just that.
They’ve combined sophisticated analytics software with a  network of sensors the state has already embedded in roadways throughout  California. With the help of a database of past traffic tie-ups, they  say they can predict when they’ll happen in the future.
IBM, which worked with the state Department of Transportation and the  California Center for Innovative Transportation at the University of  California, Berkeley, can’t tell you when an accident is going to happen  – yet. But John Day, an IBM manager, says that’s a natural extension of  the work his team has been doing, and one day could well be something  they could reasonably infer from the data they’re collecting.
For now, the researchers are showing that they can go a step beyond  what’s available on regional traffic websites, which report current  conditions. The most that might tell you is that your drive is already  backed up.
Source: Huffington Post

IBM Training Computers To Predict Traffic

Traffic websites, with their color-coded maps of clogged streets and freeways, are good at telling commuters when congestion is already awful. But what if they could know not only where you drive, but if the route is going to be bad today, and warned you ahead of time?

A team of researchers at IBM Corp. are working on a system that would do just that.

They’ve combined sophisticated analytics software with a network of sensors the state has already embedded in roadways throughout California. With the help of a database of past traffic tie-ups, they say they can predict when they’ll happen in the future.

IBM, which worked with the state Department of Transportation and the California Center for Innovative Transportation at the University of California, Berkeley, can’t tell you when an accident is going to happen – yet. But John Day, an IBM manager, says that’s a natural extension of the work his team has been doing, and one day could well be something they could reasonably infer from the data they’re collecting.

For now, the researchers are showing that they can go a step beyond what’s available on regional traffic websites, which report current conditions. The most that might tell you is that your drive is already backed up.

Source: Huffington Post

Android Phone Gets Driver Out of a Ticket
Source: Slashgear
College student Sahas Katta was able to beat his speeding ticket in traffic court using…drumroll please…his Android smartphone, and a handy app. Katta was pulled over and charged with going 40mph in a 25mph zone. But he wasn’t going 40, only 26mph. His word against the officer’s right? Not so much, since he was running My Tracks by Google in the background on his Motorola Droid phone.
The free app records and visualizes GPS data on a map, tracking distance, average speed, average moving speed, and max speed. Katta downloaded this information to Google Docs and brought it with him to the courtroom. He was able to convince the judge that the officer might not have been using his radar gun correctly, introducing enough reasonable doubt that he was declared “not guilty”. Nice!

Android Phone Gets Driver Out of a Ticket

Source: Slashgear

College student Sahas Katta was able to beat his speeding ticket in traffic court using…drumroll please…his Android smartphone, and a handy app. Katta was pulled over and charged with going 40mph in a 25mph zone. But he wasn’t going 40, only 26mph. His word against the officer’s right? Not so much, since he was running My Tracks by Google in the background on his Motorola Droid phone.

The free app records and visualizes GPS data on a map, tracking distance, average speed, average moving speed, and max speed. Katta downloaded this information to Google Docs and brought it with him to the courtroom. He was able to convince the judge that the officer might not have been using his radar gun correctly, introducing enough reasonable doubt that he was declared “not guilty”. Nice!

The company is using a combination of RFID sensors, GPS and cellular communication technology to ensure its products are transported at the proper temperature, and that trailers are not opened while in transit.

Tracking Every Pill, Every Piece Of Food – The Internet Of Things Cometh | Singularity Hub
IBM is developing the software that, in conjunction with barcodes, GPS sensors, and environmental controls, could help us ensure that every drug we take came from the manufacturers we trust and in the condition they required. It’s the Internet of Things for prescription drugs, and it could save lives and streamline inventory all over the world. Watch IBM’s executives explain their ideas in the video below.

Tracking Every Pill, Every Piece Of Food – The Internet Of Things Cometh | Singularity Hub

IBM is developing the software that, in conjunction with barcodes, GPS sensors, and environmental controls, could help us ensure that every drug we take came from the manufacturers we trust and in the condition they required. It’s the Internet of Things for prescription drugs, and it could save lives and streamline inventory all over the world. Watch IBM’s executives explain their ideas in the video below.

4 New APIs: US Congress, Semantic Search, Fashion Search Engine, Read-Write Mapping

OpenCongress API: OpenCongress brings together official government data with news and blog coverage to give users the real story behind each bill. The OpenCongress API also developers to access all this data for their website or application.

The TownMe API includes both read and write geo-related services. The read side has a reverse geocoder which helps translate coordinates into human readable elements or associations. For instance, give the API “37.78093,-122.409415″ and it will return information about the census tract, neighborhood, city, MSA, and state that contains these coordinates

On Wednesday, Google announced that it would open its servers to geographic data belonging to anyone. This means that developers will be able to quickly build a location-based Web service without having to also manage their own data server. (via Technology Review: Google Grabs More Geo-Data)

On Wednesday, Google announced that it would open its servers to geographic data belonging to anyone. This means that developers will be able to quickly build a location-based Web service without having to also manage their own data server. (via Technology Review: Google Grabs More Geo-Data)

The U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are teaming up to remotely corral cattle using a wireless device that sends sound straight into the bovines’ ears. (via GPS headsets make sure the cows come home | CNET)

The U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are teaming up to remotely corral cattle using a wireless device that sends sound straight into the bovines’ ears. (via GPS headsets make sure the cows come home | CNET)

New BlackBerry application could enhance campus security

An innovative piece of BlackBerry technology developed by a group of engineering students at Yale University could add another dimension to campus safety.The free smartphone application called BScope allows BlackBerrys to use raw GPS data to provide highly accurate information on the movements of the phone’s owner.

New BlackBerry application could enhance campus security - The Daily Pennsylvanian