Smart Contact Lens for Diabetics

By now, we’re all familiar with the idea of wearable health trackers. But we’re used to seeing them on our wrists. If Google gets its way, the next batch of wearables may be worn in your eyes.
The company’s experimental wing, Google[x], announced on Thursday its plan to test a prototype of a smart contact lens that would monitor the sugar levels of diabetes patients, possibly alerting them when glucose levels become dangerously high or low.
Google is making a smart contact lens

Smart Contact Lens for Diabetics

By now, we’re all familiar with the idea of wearable health trackers. But we’re used to seeing them on our wrists. If Google gets its way, the next batch of wearables may be worn in your eyes.

The company’s experimental wing, Google[x], announced on Thursday its plan to test a prototype of a smart contact lens that would monitor the sugar levels of diabetes patients, possibly alerting them when glucose levels become dangerously high or low.

Google is making a smart contact lens

More wearables/connected devices and quantified-self launches at CES:
Socks with sensors that improve your running (from Sensoria)
A connected/smart bed that improves your sleep (from Sleep Number)
Two more fitness trackers/wearables/smart watches hybrids (from Atlas and Scosche)

More wearables/connected devices and quantified-self launches at CES:

  • Socks with sensors that improve your running (from Sensoria)
  • A connected/smart bed that improves your sleep (from Sleep Number)
  • Two more fitness trackers/wearables/smart watches hybrids (from Atlas and Scosche)

(via analyticisms)

Samsung Tips $100 Million IoT Strategy
"IoT is all about sensing and collecting the data — and then transporting it [to the cloud]. Once it’s there, it’s about massaging it and sending it back to the user," said Julia, who described the sensing and collecting stage with the "big data" moniker, but who spoke of the machine learning and analytic engines sending data back to the user as "small data" — advice that is directly relevant to people’s lives.

Samsung Tips $100 Million IoT Strategy

"IoT is all about sensing and collecting the data — and then transporting it [to the cloud]. Once it’s there, it’s about massaging it and sending it back to the user," said Julia, who described the sensing and collecting stage with the "big data" moniker, but who spoke of the machine learning and analytic engines sending data back to the user as "small data" — advice that is directly relevant to people’s lives.

(via internetofth)

By 2017, the City of Portland will have experienced a net positive return on investment in its bicycle infrastructure of $500 million in healthcare savings and $200 million fuel savings.

Gotschi, Thomas. Costs and benefits of bicycling investments in Portland, Oregon. Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 2011,8 (Suppl 1), S49-S58.

via oregon metro regional active transportation plan, aug. 2013 draft, pg.19.

(via citymaus)

(via thisbigcity)

Since the Affordable Care Act was signed three years ago, more than 370 innovative medical practices, called accountable care organizations, have sprung up across the country, with 150 more in the works. At these centers, Medicare or private insurers reward doctors financially when their patients require fewer hospital stays, emergency room visits and surgeries — exactly the opposite of what doctors have traditionally been paid to do. The more money the organization saves, the more money its participating providers share. And the best way to save costs (which is, happily, also the best way to keep patients alive) is to catch problems before they explode into emergencies.

Thus the accountable care organizations have become the Silicon Valley of preventive care, laboratories of invention driven by the entrepreneurial energy of start-ups.

These organizations have invested heavily in information technology so they can crunch patient records to identify those most at risk, those who are overdue for checkups, those who have not been filling their prescriptions and presumably have not been taking their meds. They then deploy new medical SWAT teams — including not just doctors but health coaches, care coordinators, nurse practitioners — to intervene and encourage patients to live healthier lives.

Boston Children’s Hospital and IBM Introduce OPENPediatrics (by IBM)

Boston Children’s Hospital and IBM introduce an all new social learning platform, OPENPediatrics, to enable clinicians to improve treatment and outcomes for critically ill children around the world.

IBM’s massive bet on Watson
Dr. Mark Kris is among the top lung cancer specialists in the world. As chief of thoracic oncology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering (MSK) Cancer Center in New York City, he has been diagnosing and treating patients for more than 30 years. But even he is overwhelmed by the massive amount of information that goes into figuring out which drugs to give his patients — and the relatively crude tools he has to decipher that data. “This is the standard for treatment today,” he says, passing me a well-worn printout of the 2013 treatment guidelines in his office. We choose a cancer type. A paragraph of instructions says to pair two drugs from a list of 16. “Do the math,” he says. It means more than 100 possible combinations. “How do you figure out which ones are the best?” 

IBM’s massive bet on Watson

Dr. Mark Kris is among the top lung cancer specialists in the world. As chief of thoracic oncology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering (MSK) Cancer Center in New York City, he has been diagnosing and treating patients for more than 30 years. But even he is overwhelmed by the massive amount of information that goes into figuring out which drugs to give his patients — and the relatively crude tools he has to decipher that data. “This is the standard for treatment today,” he says, passing me a well-worn printout of the 2013 treatment guidelines in his office. We choose a cancer type. A paragraph of instructions says to pair two drugs from a list of 16. “Do the math,” he says. It means more than 100 possible combinations. “How do you figure out which ones are the best?” 

A Mad Scientist Designing Organs That Could Give You Superpowers
Acquiring a superpower usually requires a bite from a radioactive insect, an uncomfortable dose of cosmic radiation, or the discovery of extraterrestrial parentage, but scientist Michael McAlpine hopes to make the process as simple as purchasing aspirin at the pharmacy. So far, he’s invented a “tattoo” for teeth that can detect cavities—not exactly the stuff of Hollywood blockbusters—although his latest project, a 3-D printed bionic ear that enables superhuman hearing, could be.
His latest project, a synthetic ear made with a 3-D bioprinter, is a complex biomechanical structure fabricated by depositing live cells and conductive silver in layers. It started as an exploration of material properties, but commercial applications started to appear rapidly. He discovered that cochlear implants, a leading treatment for those with some hearing impairment, are made by hand in a slow and laborious process with costs to match.
But McAlpine’s vision is much bigger than simply automating a manual process—he wants to create superhumans. “Repairing lost hearing is an incredibly noble goal,” says McAlpine, “but what we made was a coil it receives electromagnetic signals and formed a direct connection with your brain.” A phone-brain interface sounds uncanny, but according to McAlpine it’s just optimizing the existing process. Tiny hairs in our ears interpret audio signals and transform them into electrical signals that can be decoded by the brain. McAlpine’s innovation cuts out the acoustical middle man and pumps the electronic signal right into your medula and brings us one step closer to a world where we can learn kung fu by plugging into a computer. 

A Mad Scientist Designing Organs That Could Give You Superpowers

Acquiring a superpower usually requires a bite from a radioactive insect, an uncomfortable dose of cosmic radiation, or the discovery of extraterrestrial parentage, but scientist Michael McAlpine hopes to make the process as simple as purchasing aspirin at the pharmacy. So far, he’s invented a “tattoo” for teeth that can detect cavities—not exactly the stuff of Hollywood blockbusters—although his latest project, a 3-D printed bionic ear that enables superhuman hearing, could be.

His latest project, a synthetic ear made with a 3-D bioprinter, is a complex biomechanical structure fabricated by depositing live cells and conductive silver in layers. It started as an exploration of material properties, but commercial applications started to appear rapidly. He discovered that cochlear implants, a leading treatment for those with some hearing impairment, are made by hand in a slow and laborious process with costs to match.

But McAlpine’s vision is much bigger than simply automating a manual process—he wants to create superhumans. “Repairing lost hearing is an incredibly noble goal,” says McAlpine, “but what we made was a coil it receives electromagnetic signals and formed a direct connection with your brain.” A phone-brain interface sounds uncanny, but according to McAlpine it’s just optimizing the existing process. Tiny hairs in our ears interpret audio signals and transform them into electrical signals that can be decoded by the brain. McAlpine’s innovation cuts out the acoustical middle man and pumps the electronic signal right into your medula and brings us one step closer to a world where we can learn kung fu by plugging into a computer. 

(via futureofscience)

Defibrillator Equipped Drones Speed Treatment To Those In Need - PSFK
When someone is having a cardiac arrhythmia, getting an automatic external defibrillator (AED) to that person as quickly as possible can often be the difference between life and death. The problem is that AEDs are usually only readily available in high pedestrian traffic areas such as airports or sports stadiums, due to the cost of each device. In less populated areas, it can sometimes take hours for the necessary equipment to arrive. Imagine if there was a quick and easy way to get the lifesaving tools to someone in need, faster than any ambulance or EMT.
The Defikopter is a drone that can deliver a defibrillator to heart attack victims much quicker than emergency responders. Conceived by Germany-based nonprofit Definetz, the system can carry an AED to any location based on its GPS coordinates. Although the system is still in the early stages of development, the team are developing a smartphone app that those with heart problems, or their family, can download and have on hand in case of emergency.

Defibrillator Equipped Drones Speed Treatment To Those In Need - PSFK

When someone is having a cardiac arrhythmia, getting an automatic external defibrillator (AED) to that person as quickly as possible can often be the difference between life and death. The problem is that AEDs are usually only readily available in high pedestrian traffic areas such as airports or sports stadiums, due to the cost of each device. In less populated areas, it can sometimes take hours for the necessary equipment to arrive. Imagine if there was a quick and easy way to get the lifesaving tools to someone in need, faster than any ambulance or EMT.

The Defikopter is a drone that can deliver a defibrillator to heart attack victims much quicker than emergency responders. Conceived by Germany-based nonprofit Definetz, the system can carry an AED to any location based on its GPS coordinates. Although the system is still in the early stages of development, the team are developing a smartphone app that those with heart problems, or their family, can download and have on hand in case of emergency.