Honda’s Robotic Lawn Mower Creates Perfectly Manicured Gardens - PSFK
Honda recently introduced the Honda Miimo, the first commercial robotic lawn mower. The perfect solution for those wanting a beautiful lawn but would rather not–or are unable to–mow it themselves, this robotic helper only needs minimal human interaction when working to ensure a beautifully cut lawn, every day, for the length of the mowing season.
Honda Miimo operates a ‘continuous cutting’ system, typically mowing just 2-3mm of grass at a time, several times each week. It cuts in a random pattern, meaning less stress on the grass, more healthy growth and reduced moss and weeds. To prevent the Honda Miimo from running into the neighbor’s yard, a boundary wire, installed under the ground or in the grass around the perimeter of the garden, helps Miimo navigate the garden through an intelligent combination of controls, timers and real-time sensory feedback.
via PSFK: http://www.psfk.com/2012/08/honda-robotic-lawn-mower.html#ixzz24J4gM672

Honda’s Robotic Lawn Mower Creates Perfectly Manicured Gardens - PSFK

Honda recently introduced the Honda Miimo, the first commercial robotic lawn mower. The perfect solution for those wanting a beautiful lawn but would rather not–or are unable to–mow it themselves, this robotic helper only needs minimal human interaction when working to ensure a beautifully cut lawn, every day, for the length of the mowing season.

Honda Miimo operates a ‘continuous cutting’ system, typically mowing just 2-3mm of grass at a time, several times each week. It cuts in a random pattern, meaning less stress on the grass, more healthy growth and reduced moss and weeds. To prevent the Honda Miimo from running into the neighbor’s yard, a boundary wire, installed under the ground or in the grass around the perimeter of the garden, helps Miimo navigate the garden through an intelligent combination of controls, timers and real-time sensory feedback.



via PSFK: http://www.psfk.com/2012/08/honda-robotic-lawn-mower.html#ixzz24J4gM672

EV Week: Electric Vehicle Charging: A Pilot to Turn “Challenge” into “Opportunity” « A Smarter Planet Blog
By Jonathan Marshall, Chief, External CommunicationsPacific Gas and Electric Company
Electric vehicle (EV) owners and electric utilities may soon enjoy a much closer and more fulfilling relationship than traditional car owners have with gas stations, thanks to a new pilot project announced today by IBM, Honda Motors, and Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E). This collaboration aims to demonstrate the ability to optimize the charge schedule for each customer’s EV battery so that the needs of customers and the electric grid are satisfied on an ongoing basis. That’s still a stretch for most utilities.
When the typical power engineer hears “electric vehicle,” he or she usually thinks: “challenge.” A plug-in vehicle can draw as much power as three homes in the more temperate parts of California. An enthusiastic bunch of early adopters could potentially overload local circuits if they all charge up at the same time in the same neighborhood.
But PG&E is thinking instead, “opportunity.” For one thing, we have a growing number of clean electric vehicles in our own fleet, from Chevy Volts to a new class of extended-range pickup trucks from Via Motors. And we know that widespread adoption of EVs throughout California will help the state meet its ambitious clean-air goals.
For another, we believe there’s great potential for using the latest “smart grid” technology to facilitate vehicle charging at night, when demand is low. By making use of underutilized generation and grid resources at off-peak times, EVs can help utilities make more efficient use of their assets and spread costs over a wider load without overtaxing the system.
PG&E demonstrated last year, in the first utility test of smart charging, that it could control vehicle charging through its SmartMeter™ infrastructure. But in a competitive marketplace, many customers may want to put control of their charging in other hands—such as the vehicle manufacturer or another trusted vendor. The whole process may someday be controlled by a third-party app on your smart phone.
(read more)

EV Week: Electric Vehicle Charging: A Pilot to Turn “Challenge” into “Opportunity” « A Smarter Planet Blog

By Jonathan Marshall, Chief, External Communications
Pacific Gas and Electric Company

Electric vehicle (EV) owners and electric utilities may soon enjoy a much closer and more fulfilling relationship than traditional car owners have with gas stations, thanks to a new pilot project announced today by IBM, Honda Motors, and Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E). This collaboration aims to demonstrate the ability to optimize the charge schedule for each customer’s EV battery so that the needs of customers and the electric grid are satisfied on an ongoing basis. That’s still a stretch for most utilities.

When the typical power engineer hears “electric vehicle,” he or she usually thinks: “challenge.” A plug-in vehicle can draw as much power as three homes in the more temperate parts of California. An enthusiastic bunch of early adopters could potentially overload local circuits if they all charge up at the same time in the same neighborhood.

But PG&E is thinking instead, “opportunity.” For one thing, we have a growing number of clean electric vehicles in our own fleet, from Chevy Volts to a new class of extended-range pickup trucks from Via Motors. And we know that widespread adoption of EVs throughout California will help the state meet its ambitious clean-air goals.

For another, we believe there’s great potential for using the latest “smart grid” technology to facilitate vehicle charging at night, when demand is low. By making use of underutilized generation and grid resources at off-peak times, EVs can help utilities make more efficient use of their assets and spread costs over a wider load without overtaxing the system.

PG&E demonstrated last year, in the first utility test of smart charging, that it could control vehicle charging through its SmartMeter™ infrastructure. But in a competitive marketplace, many customers may want to put control of their charging in other hands—such as the vehicle manufacturer or another trusted vendor. The whole process may someday be controlled by a third-party app on your smart phone.

(read more)

Honda’s FCX Clarity can power a home for 6 days | The Car Tech blog - CNET Reviews
Honda equips an FCX Clarity with a mobile power supply system and reveals a new solar-powered hydrogen-fueling station in Japan.
A story from FuelCellToday shows how Honda has turned the FCX Clarity into a zero emissions electric generator on wheels. The auto manufacturer outfitted the hydrogen fuel cell vehicle with a mobile power supply system, enabling the car to provide 9 kilowatts of electricity continuously for more than seven hours on a full tank of hydrogen at peak generation. At the lower-generation rates needed to power a typical home in Japan, the FCX Clarity could provide electricity for six days.
Nissan and Mitsubishi also have vehicle-to-home power systems, albeit with smaller energy capacities. These systems can be used in emergency power outage situations or to offset the cost of electricity during peak use hours.

Honda’s FCX Clarity can power a home for 6 days | The Car Tech blog - CNET Reviews

Honda equips an FCX Clarity with a mobile power supply system and reveals a new solar-powered hydrogen-fueling station in Japan.

A story from FuelCellToday shows how Honda has turned the FCX Clarity into a zero emissions electric generator on wheels. The auto manufacturer outfitted the hydrogen fuel cell vehicle with a mobile power supply system, enabling the car to provide 9 kilowatts of electricity continuously for more than seven hours on a full tank of hydrogen at peak generation. At the lower-generation rates needed to power a typical home in Japan, the FCX Clarity could provide electricity for six days.

Nissan and Mitsubishi also have vehicle-to-home power systems, albeit with smaller energy capacities. These systems can be used in emergency power outage situations or to offset the cost of electricity during peak use hours.

“All-new ASIMO”, Honda’s humanoid robot - The Next Web

At just 4′ 3”, the newest ASIMO can run at 9kph forwards, also run backwards, jump up and down and even jump on one foot. IEEE Spectrum points out that ASIMO’s hands are dexterous enough to perform sign language and by combining tactile and visual sensors, he can recognize objects and handle them appropriately, such as taking caps off of bottles and pouring liquid into paper cups without crushing them.

thenextweb:

electricpower:

Honda will bring plug-in hybrids, full EVs to United States in 2012 
Though they probably won’t look anything like Honda’s adorable EV-N, the Japanese automaker’s got some new technological vehicles up its sleeves — in a speech today, Honda CEO Takanobu Ito formally announced plans to produce a plug-in hybrid competitor for Toyota’s flashy new PHEV Prius by 2012, which rumor has it will sport an estimated fuel economy (when it’s using fuel, we assume) of roughly around 140 miles per gallon. Better still, a completely battery-powered electrical vehicle will also go on sale by 2012, and you won’t have to fly to Japan to try them out, as they’re slated for the States as well. Hydrogen fuel cells are apparently still Honda’s long-term solution, though the FCX Clarity received only a passing mention. In the short term, Honda’s still circling the wagons around part-gasoline systems like the Civic (which will receive a Li-ion battery pack) and the Fit Hybrid, destined for Japan this fall.
Engadget

electricpower:

Honda will bring plug-in hybrids, full EVs to United States in 2012 

Though they probably won’t look anything like Honda’s adorable EV-N, the Japanese automaker’s got some new technological vehicles up its sleeves — in a speech today, Honda CEO Takanobu Ito formally announced plans to produce a plug-in hybrid competitor for Toyota’s flashy new PHEV Prius by 2012, which rumor has it will sport an estimated fuel economy (when it’s using fuel, we assume) of roughly around 140 miles per gallon. Better still, a completely battery-powered electrical vehicle will also go on sale by 2012, and you won’t have to fly to Japan to try them out, as they’re slated for the States as well. Hydrogen fuel cells are apparently still Honda’s long-term solution, though the FCX Clarity received only a passing mention. In the short term, Honda’s still circling the wagons around part-gasoline systems like the Civic (which will receive a Li-ion battery pack) and the Fit Hybrid, destined for Japan this fall.

Engadget