Apple and IBM Team Up to Push iOS in the Enterprise | Re/code

Apple and IBM today announced a broad partnership to help companies deploy wireless devices and business-specific applications to run on them.

The combination brings together two historical competitors — who decades ago struggled to dominate the nascent market for personal computers — on the next wave of computing in business: Mobile devices with access to complex data running in the cloud.

In an interview with Re/code at Apple’s headquarters in Cupertino, Calif., Apple CEO Tim Cook and IBM CEO Ginni Rometty described the tie-up as one that only the two companies could deliver.

“If you were building a puzzle they would fit nicely together with no overlap,” Cook said of the relationship. “We do not compete on anything. And when you do that you end up with something better than either of you could produce yourself.”

Calling Apple the “gold standard for consumers,” Rometty said the team-up will allow the two giants to address significant opportunities facing large businesses. “We will get to remake professions and unlock value that companies don’t yet have,” she said. “We’re addressing serious issues that before this had been inhibiting deployment of wireless in the enterprise.”

Apple and IBM Team Up to Push iOS in the Enterprise | Re/code

Apple and IBM today announced a broad partnership to help companies deploy wireless devices and business-specific applications to run on them.

The combination brings together two historical competitors — who decades ago struggled to dominate the nascent market for personal computers — on the next wave of computing in business: Mobile devices with access to complex data running in the cloud.

In an interview with Re/code at Apple’s headquarters in Cupertino, Calif., Apple CEO Tim Cook and IBM CEO Ginni Rometty described the tie-up as one that only the two companies could deliver.

“If you were building a puzzle they would fit nicely together with no overlap,” Cook said of the relationship. “We do not compete on anything. And when you do that you end up with something better than either of you could produce yourself.”

Calling Apple the “gold standard for consumers,” Rometty said the team-up will allow the two giants to address significant opportunities facing large businesses. “We will get to remake professions and unlock value that companies don’t yet have,” she said. “We’re addressing serious issues that before this had been inhibiting deployment of wireless in the enterprise.”

ibmsocialbiz:

Tomorrow’s forecast calls for personalized clouds | VentureBeat | Cloud | by Kelly Chambliss, IBM
It’s the age of personalization.
Our laptops, phones, and tablets suggest books we should read and movies we should watch. Grocery stores give out coupons based on our buying habits. But up until now, cloud computing has been ready-made, rather than custom-made. That’s about to change.

ibmsocialbiz:

Tomorrow’s forecast calls for personalized clouds | VentureBeat | Cloud | by Kelly Chambliss, IBM

It’s the age of personalization.

Our laptops, phones, and tablets suggest books we should read and movies we should watch. Grocery stores give out coupons based on our buying habits. But up until now, cloud computing has been ready-made, rather than custom-made. That’s about to change.

How New IBM Fellow Pours Analytics into Real-World Problems A Smarter Planet Blog
As a teenager parking cars at a Fort Lauderdale country club, IBM customer analytics consulting leader Mike Haydock picked up much more than just tips. Take the life lesson he received one day from Academy Award winning actor George C. Scott. “He gave me a tremendous insight on how he got into the role of Patton,” Haydock said. “He told me he became that role. He became Patton. That’s how he was able to pull that performance off.” Haydock says he applies that same philosophy to his own work with clients. “I start to think like them,” he said. “So I know everything about the problem they’re trying to solve and probably more.” That immersive approach has made Haydock, known as the ‘Math Maestro,’ one of IBM’s most sought after analytics experts, a demand that is likely to grow now that he has been named an IBM Fellow. The Fellow designation acknowledges an employee’s important contributions as well as their industry-leading innovations in developing some of the world’s most important technologies. From designing the most efficient way to butcher cattle, to creating an original dynamic pricing model for airline fares, Haydock has applied deep analytics solutions with clients across a broad set of industries.

How New IBM Fellow Pours Analytics into Real-World Problems A Smarter Planet Blog

As a teenager parking cars at a Fort Lauderdale country club, IBM customer analytics consulting leader Mike Haydock picked up much more than just tips.
Take the life lesson he received one day from Academy Award winning actor George C. Scott. “He gave me a tremendous insight on how he got into the role of Patton,” Haydock said. “He told me he became that role. He became Patton. That’s how he was able to pull that performance off.”
Haydock says he applies that same philosophy to his own work with clients. “I start to think like them,” he said. “So I know everything about the problem they’re trying to solve and probably more.”
That immersive approach has made Haydock, known as the ‘Math Maestro,’ one of IBM’s most sought after analytics experts, a demand that is likely to grow now that he has been named an IBM Fellow. The Fellow designation acknowledges an employee’s important contributions as well as their industry-leading innovations in developing some of the world’s most important technologies.
From designing the most efficient way to butcher cattle, to creating an original dynamic pricing model for airline fares, Haydock has applied deep analytics solutions with clients across a broad set of industries.

IBM to start crunching connected car data for Peugeot — GigaOM


IBM is putting its data analytics to work on information collected from Peugeot’s in-car sensors, ostensibly combining it with data from traffic infrastructure and smartphones to create better car apps and more network-aware vehicles.

IBM to start crunching connected car data for Peugeot — GigaOM


IBM is putting its data analytics to work on information collected from Peugeot’s in-car sensors, ostensibly combining it with data from traffic infrastructure and smartphones to create better car apps and more network-aware vehicles.

IBM Solar Collector Magnifies Sun By 2000X – These Could Provide Power To The Entire Planet | Collective-Evolution

A team at IBM recently developed what they call a High Concentration Photo Voltaic Thermal (HCPVT) system that is capable of concentrating the power of 2,000 suns, they are even claiming to be able to concentrate energy safely up to 5,000X, that’s huge. The process of trapping the sunlight produces water that can be used to produce filtered drinkable water, or used for other things like air conditioning etc. Scientists envision that the HCPVT system could provide sustainable energy and fresh water to communities all around the world.

IBM Solar Collector Magnifies Sun By 2000X – These Could Provide Power To The Entire Planet | Collective-Evolution

A team at IBM recently developed what they call a High Concentration Photo Voltaic Thermal (HCPVT) system that is capable of concentrating the power of 2,000 suns, they are even claiming to be able to concentrate energy safely up to 5,000X, that’s huge. The process of trapping the sunlight produces water that can be used to produce filtered drinkable water, or used for other things like air conditioning etc. Scientists envision that the HCPVT system could provide sustainable energy and fresh water to communities all around the world.

IBM’s more powerful Watson supercomputer is opening up for public use | The Verge
IBM’s Watson supercomputer is taking a big step towards public use. Today, the company announced plans to open Watson up to developers in 2014, establishing an open platform and API that would let coders to build apps on top of the supercomputer’s database and natural language skills. It’s not the first time the project’s been used by outside groups, but the new platform will give developers complete control of the front-end, and require only minimal input from the Watson team at IBM. Companies will still have to contract an instance of Watson from IBM, but once that’s done, their programs will be able to pull questions and answers from the supercomputer in real time.
IBM says the API itself is unusually simple, providing programs with a direct path to ask Watson natural language questions and get an answers back with links to the relevant content from Watson’s database. The question is what the rest of the world might use it for. “We believe that this is such a significant development in the future of computing that we want other people involved in it,” said IBM’s chief technology officer Rob High. “We want to let other partners to have a much deeper say in how cognitive computing evolves.” The program is launching with three partners, including a Fluid Retail deployment that plans to bring a Watson-powered personal-shopper feature to North Face’s e-commerce shop in 2014.

IBM’s more powerful Watson supercomputer is opening up for public use | The Verge

IBM’s Watson supercomputer is taking a big step towards public use. Today, the company announced plans to open Watson up to developers in 2014, establishing an open platform and API that would let coders to build apps on top of the supercomputer’s database and natural language skills. It’s not the first time the project’s been used by outside groups, but the new platform will give developers complete control of the front-end, and require only minimal input from the Watson team at IBM. Companies will still have to contract an instance of Watson from IBM, but once that’s done, their programs will be able to pull questions and answers from the supercomputer in real time.

IBM says the API itself is unusually simple, providing programs with a direct path to ask Watson natural language questions and get an answers back with links to the relevant content from Watson’s database. The question is what the rest of the world might use it for. “We believe that this is such a significant development in the future of computing that we want other people involved in it,” said IBM’s chief technology officer Rob High. “We want to let other partners to have a much deeper say in how cognitive computing evolves.” The program is launching with three partners, including a Fluid Retail deployment that plans to bring a Watson-powered personal-shopper feature to North Face’s e-commerce shop in 2014.

Welcome to The Customer Activated Enterprise (by IBMIBV)

Bridget van Kralingen, senior vice president, IBM Global Business Services shares highlights from IBM’s new C-suite study: The Customer-activated Enterprise. Download a copy of the this overview at www.ibm.com/csuitestudy

In this video, she talks about an emerging trend around how CEOs are looking to customers to drive business strategy and better understand critical market shifts.

Qantas Airways - Self-service kiosks and friendly agents revolutionize airport check in process
Getting smarter
Self-service kiosks, RFID card readers and bag-ticket printers allow Qantas passengers to perform all aspects of the check-in process in a matter of seconds.
Instrumented: Kiosks and card readers in the terminal area detect the arrival of passengers through either a mobile device or RFID-embedded frequent flyer card.

Interconnected: The check-in solution is integrated in near real time with the airline’s reservation, inventory and departure system.

Intelligent: Analysis of passenger behavior has enabled Qantas to optimize the allocation of agent resources, as well as the configuration of kiosk and other devices throughout the terminal.

Qantas Airways - Self-service kiosks and friendly agents revolutionize airport check in process

Getting smarter

Self-service kiosks, RFID card readers and bag-ticket printers allow Qantas passengers to perform all aspects of the check-in process in a matter of seconds.

  • Instrumented: Kiosks and card readers in the terminal area detect the arrival of passengers through either a mobile device or RFID-embedded frequent flyer card.

  • Interconnected: The check-in solution is integrated in near real time with the airline’s reservation, inventory and departure system.

  • Intelligent: Analysis of passenger behavior has enabled Qantas to optimize the allocation of agent resources, as well as the configuration of kiosk and other devices throughout the terminal.

They’ve been called brainiac, genius, wizard. And now, IBM Fellow. Join our Tumblr-style toast to the newly minted class of ’13, on the 50th anniversary of the Fellows program.
Launched in 1963, just 246 individuals have earned the title of IBM Fellow for their achievements in technology, science, engineering and research. It’s quite the elite group, with a unique role—to lead IBMers as they tackle the world’s most challenging problems and continue laying the foundation for a smarter planet.
 

They’ve been called brainiac, genius, wizard. And now, IBM Fellow.

J
oin our Tumblr-style toast to the newly minted class of ’13, on the 50th anniversary of the Fellows program.

Launched in 1963, just 246 individuals have earned the title of IBM Fellow for their achievements in technology, science, engineering and research. It’s quite the elite group, with a unique role—to lead IBMers as they tackle the world’s most challenging problems and continue laying the foundation for a smarter planet.