smartercities:

IBM scientists in India create a device that could power lights, fans and phone chargers with discarded laptop batteries | IBM Research Blog
By using discarded laptop batteries, we created a device that could power lights, fans and mobile phone chargers. The specific prototype we built was able to provide around 20 Watt-hours of energy. In other words, it can power a 5W DC light bulb for about four hours before running out of charge.

smartercities:

IBM scientists in India create a device that could power lights, fans and phone chargers with discarded laptop batteries | IBM Research Blog

By using discarded laptop batteries, we created a device that could power lights, fans and mobile phone chargers. The specific prototype we built was able to provide around 20 Watt-hours of energy. In other words, it can power a 5W DC light bulb for about four hours before running out of charge.

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"People want to see patterns in the world. It is how we evolved. We descended from those primates who were best at spotting the telltale pattern of a predator in the forest, or of food in the savannah. So important is this skill that we apply it everywhere, warranted or not."Benoît MandelbrotFractal Inventor, IBM Fellow Emeritus

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"People want to see patterns in the world. It is how we evolved. We descended from those primates who were best at spotting the telltale pattern of a predator in the forest, or of food in the savannah. So important is this skill that we apply it everywhere, warranted or not."

Benoît Mandelbrot
Fractal Inventor, IBM Fellow Emeritus

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"I believe humans advanced so much faster than the rest of the animal kingdom, because we had a far superior way of learning from each other – that we could observe, listen and not have to experience an event to learn from it. Our technology today will enable our ability to co-­learn on an exponential scale.” INSIDE THE INVENTIVE MIND:Nancy GrecoIBM Watson Researcher

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"I believe humans advanced so much faster than the rest of the animal kingdom, because we had a far superior way of learning from each other – that we could observe, listen and not have to experience an event to learn from it. Our technology today will enable our ability to co-­learn on an exponential scale.” 

INSIDE THE INVENTIVE MIND:
Nancy Greco
IBM Watson Researcher

Winning World Wide | The IBM Research & GBS Data Visualization Prototype

What does a year of business wins — thousands of client projects from across every industry and around the world — look like for IBM’s consulting organization?

Based on actual data from GBS Sales Operations over the past 12 months, this big data visualization prototype by IBM Research and GBS Communications brings the velocity, volume and variety of all this real-world work to life, in 3D geography and a global mapping.mode.

IBM research stakes its future on cognitive computing | ZDNet
IBM Senior Vice President John E. Kelly / Photo: Audrey Quinn
YORKTOWN HEIGHTS, NY – IBM began its colloquium on cognitive computing today with a jewel in the company’s crown. Senior Vice President John E. Kelly took the stage following a video from January 14th, 2011 – the day when IBM’s Watson machine handedly beat Jeopardy champs Ken Jennings and Ken Rutter.
“I remember saying to the audience at that time,” recalled Kelly, “I don’t know if we’re going to win today. But it’s only a matter of when not if a system like Watson is going to surpass human beings at this task. People asked, ‘When did you realize how important this was?’ I think I realized in the year coming up to this that this was really special. Something was really changing in the way that computer systems interacted with people – something very big beyond just a game show is occurring here.”
So what is going on here? The world of data is now exploding, Kelly said, and machines like Watson have arose to provide us with better ways of harnessing this information.
“We are literally creating a digital universe,” he said. “And the way we have to process that is different than we’ve ever experienced before. What we were creating was a system that would be able to deal with portions of this tsunami of data coming at us. If we try to use first generation computing against this wave, it can’t be done. So we need a whole different set of systems, extracting information from noisy data sources in order to come up with rational answers.”
Kelly broke down the history of computing into three eras. First, there was the the tabulating era, with early calculators and tabulating machines made of mechanical systems and later, vacuum tubes. “In the first era of computing we basically fed data in on punch cards,” he said. “There was really no extraction of the data itself, the data was just going along for the ride.”
Next came the programmable era of computing, which ranged in form from vacuum tubes to microprocessors. “It was about taking processes and putting them into the machine,” Kelly explained. “It’s completely controlled by the programming we inflict on the system.”
And now, Kelly said, we are entering the era of cognitive computing, where computers can help us to unlock the insights that this new wealth of data holds. “If we don’t make this transition,” Kelly argued, “the data will be too big for us to have any impact on it. I think that this era of computing is going to be about scaling human capability. The separation between human and machine is going to blur in a very fundamental way.”

IBM research stakes its future on cognitive computing | ZDNet

IBM Senior Vice President John E. Kelly / Photo: Audrey Quinn

YORKTOWN HEIGHTS, NY – IBM began its colloquium on cognitive computing today with a jewel in the company’s crown. Senior Vice President John E. Kelly took the stage following a video from January 14th, 2011 – the day when IBM’s Watson machine handedly beat Jeopardy champs Ken Jennings and Ken Rutter.

“I remember saying to the audience at that time,” recalled Kelly, “I don’t know if we’re going to win today. But it’s only a matter of when not if a system like Watson is going to surpass human beings at this task. People asked, ‘When did you realize how important this was?’ I think I realized in the year coming up to this that this was really special. Something was really changing in the way that computer systems interacted with people – something very big beyond just a game show is occurring here.”

So what is going on here? The world of data is now exploding, Kelly said, and machines like Watson have arose to provide us with better ways of harnessing this information.

“We are literally creating a digital universe,” he said. “And the way we have to process that is different than we’ve ever experienced before. What we were creating was a system that would be able to deal with portions of this tsunami of data coming at us. If we try to use first generation computing against this wave, it can’t be done. So we need a whole different set of systems, extracting information from noisy data sources in order to come up with rational answers.”

Kelly broke down the history of computing into three eras. First, there was the the tabulating era, with early calculators and tabulating machines made of mechanical systems and later, vacuum tubes. “In the first era of computing we basically fed data in on punch cards,” he said. “There was really no extraction of the data itself, the data was just going along for the ride.”

Next came the programmable era of computing, which ranged in form from vacuum tubes to microprocessors. “It was about taking processes and putting them into the machine,” Kelly explained. “It’s completely controlled by the programming we inflict on the system.”

And now, Kelly said, we are entering the era of cognitive computing, where computers can help us to unlock the insights that this new wealth of data holds. “If we don’t make this transition,” Kelly argued, “the data will be too big for us to have any impact on it. I think that this era of computing is going to be about scaling human capability. The separation between human and machine is going to blur in a very fundamental way.”

Smart Machines: IBM’s Watson and the Era of Cognitive Computing
John E. Kelly III and Steve Hamm
We are crossing a new frontier in the evolution of computing and entering the era of cognitive systems. The victory of IBM’s Watson on the television quiz show Jeopardy! revealed how scientists and engineers at IBM and elsewhere are pushing the boundaries of science and technology to create machines that sense, learn, reason, and interact with people in new ways to provide insight and advice.In Smart Machines, John E. Kelly III, director of IBM Research, and Steve Hamm, a writer at IBM and a former business and technology journalist, introduce the fascinating world of “cognitive systems” to general audiences and provide a window into the future of computing. Cognitive systems promise to penetrate complexity and assist people and organizations in better decision making. They can help doctors evaluate and treat patients, augment the ways we see, anticipate major weather events, and contribute to smarter urban planning. Kelly and Hamm’s comprehensive perspective describes this technology inside and out and explains how it will help us conquer the harnessing and understanding of “big data,” one of the major computing challenges facing businesses and governments in the coming decades. Absorbing and impassioned, their book will inspire governments, academics, and the global tech industry to work together to power this exciting wave in innovation.
 (use code SMART to get a 30% discount)

Smart Machines: IBM’s Watson and the Era of Cognitive Computing

John E. Kelly III and Steve Hamm

We are crossing a new frontier in the evolution of computing and entering the era of cognitive systems. The victory of IBM’s Watson on the television quiz show Jeopardy! revealed how scientists and engineers at IBM and elsewhere are pushing the boundaries of science and technology to create machines that sense, learn, reason, and interact with people in new ways to provide insight and advice.

In Smart Machines, John E. Kelly III, director of IBM Research, and Steve Hamm, a writer at IBM and a former business and technology journalist, introduce the fascinating world of “cognitive systems” to general audiences and provide a window into the future of computing. Cognitive systems promise to penetrate complexity and assist people and organizations in better decision making. They can help doctors evaluate and treat patients, augment the ways we see, anticipate major weather events, and contribute to smarter urban planning. Kelly and Hamm’s comprehensive perspective describes this technology inside and out and explains how it will help us conquer the harnessing and understanding of “big data,” one of the major computing challenges facing businesses and governments in the coming decades. Absorbing and impassioned, their book will inspire governments, academics, and the global tech industry to work together to power this exciting wave in innovation.

(use code SMART to get a 30% discount)

IBM Research: What is cognitive computing?

Cognitive computing systems learn and interact naturally with people to extend what either man or machine could do on their own. They help human experts make better decisions by penetrating the complexity of Big Data.

Big Data growth is accelerating as more of the world’s activity is expressed digitally, increasing in volume, speed and uncertainty. Most data now comes in unstructured forms such as video, images, symbols and natural language. A new computing model is needed in order to process and make sense of it.

Cognitive computing systems are not based on programs that predetermine every answer or action needed to perform a function or set of tasks; rather, they are trained using artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning algorithms to sense, predict, infer and, in some ways, think.
Cognitive computing systems get better over time as they build knowledge and learn a domain - its language and terminology, its processes and its preferred methods of interacting. Early cognitive systems are building domain expertise and more human-friendly interaction models in fields such as healthcare, banking, education and retail.
Smart Machines: IBM’s Watson and the Era of Cognitive Computing

Read chapter one of the new book by Director of IBM Research, John E. Kelly III and IBM writer Steve Hamm

IBM Research: What is cognitive computing?

Cognitive computing systems learn and interact naturally with people to extend what either man or machine could do on their own. They help human experts make better decisions by penetrating the complexity of Big Data.

Big Data growth is accelerating as more of the world’s activity is expressed digitally, increasing in volume, speed and uncertainty. Most data now comes in unstructured forms such as video, images, symbols and natural language. A new computing model is needed in order to process and make sense of it.

Cognitive computing systems are not based on programs that predetermine every answer or action needed to perform a function or set of tasks; rather, they are trained using artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning algorithms to sense, predict, infer and, in some ways, think.

Cognitive computing systems get better over time as they build knowledge and learn a domain - its language and terminology, its processes and its preferred methods of interacting. Early cognitive systems are building domain expertise and more human-friendly interaction models in fields such as healthcare, banking, education and retail.

Smart Machines: IBM’s Watson and the Era of Cognitive Computing