New Year, New World | New Voices for Our Path Forward (by The GBS Social Business Channel)

Using mobile devices and a new, novel collaborative video production process, millennial generation IBMers share their perspective on the path forward for IBM’s consulting organization, Global Business Services

IBM: Four Major Trends Shaping Social Business in 2013 and Beyond
At the IBM Connect 2013 conference in Orlando, Fla., Big Blue delved into the issue of what trends will affect social business in the next year and beyond. To that end, a panel of three participants discussed the trends they believe will lead to further adoption of social business. The panelists were Beverly Macy, CEO of Gravity Summit and Huffington Post columnist; Mark Fidelman, CEO of Evolve and Forbes.com columnist; and Sandy Carter, vice president of social business sales and evangelism at IBM. Carter said the first major trend shaping social business is that it is moving beyond marketing. Marketing became one of the first pieces of a business to go social, and now more segments are adopting social principles, she said. For instance, one company IBM supports is using social business software in its patent process, and another in its regulatory compliance department

IBM: Four Major Trends Shaping Social Business in 2013 and Beyond

At the IBM Connect 2013 conference in Orlando, Fla., Big Blue delved into the issue of what trends will affect social business in the next year and beyond. To that end, a panel of three participants discussed the trends they believe will lead to further adoption of social business. The panelists were Beverly Macy, CEO of Gravity Summit and Huffington Post columnist; Mark Fidelman, CEO of Evolve and Forbes.com columnist; and Sandy Carter, vice president of social business sales and evangelism at IBM. Carter said the first major trend shaping social business is that it is moving beyond marketing. Marketing became one of the first pieces of a business to go social, and now more segments are adopting social principles, she said. For instance, one company IBM supports is using social business software in its patent process, and another in its regulatory compliance department

20 Years of Patent Leadership (by IBMLabs)

IBM has generated more U.S. patents than any other company for 20 years in a row (6,478 patents in 2012). More than a number, it is an indicator of the company’s impact on industry: from semiconductor work transforming the mobile industry, to machine learning being used in healthcare, via the IBM Watson system.

IBM 2012 Tech Trends Report now available
IBM has published its 2012 Tech Trends Report: Fast Track to the Future based on a survey of over 1,200 IT professionals worldwide.  Mobile is featured prominently in the report.  Key insights from the study:
Only one in 10 organizations surveyed reported that they have all the skills they need for the four emerging technologies (cloud computing, business analytics, mobile computing and social business)
Business analytics and mobile are leading in deployment with roughly 50 percent of survey respondents having deployed
49 percent of respondents have deployed mobile
Top three barriers to adoption of mobile according to those surveyed: Security (61 percent); integration of Mobile with existing infrastructure and data (44 percent); and difficulty extending existing applications to Mobile (38 percent)
69 percent plan to increase mobile investment in the next two years, with 35 percent planning to increase it 10 percent or more
Over the next two years, 31 percent of respondents will start allowing BYOD – making it the norm for 76 percent of respondents
43 percent of respondents say their IT security policies don’t meet the needs of mobile computing

IBM 2012 Tech Trends Report now available

IBM has published its 2012 Tech Trends Report: Fast Track to the Future based on a survey of over 1,200 IT professionals worldwide.  Mobile is featured prominently in the report.  Key insights from the study:

  • Only one in 10 organizations surveyed reported that they have all the skills they need for the four emerging technologies (cloud computing, business analytics, mobile computing and social business)
  • Business analytics and mobile are leading in deployment with roughly 50 percent of survey respondents having deployed
  • 49 percent of respondents have deployed mobile
  • Top three barriers to adoption of mobile according to those surveyed: Security (61 percent); integration of Mobile with existing infrastructure and data (44 percent); and difficulty extending existing applications to Mobile (38 percent)
  • 69 percent plan to increase mobile investment in the next two years, with 35 percent planning to increase it 10 percent or more
  • Over the next two years, 31 percent of respondents will start allowing BYOD – making it the norm for 76 percent of respondents
  • 43 percent of respondents say their IT security policies don’t meet the needs of mobile computing
A new global report released today by IBM  and the Saïd Business School at the University of Oxford reveals that most Big Data initiatives currently being deployed by organizations are aimed at improving the customer experience. Yet, despite the strong focus on the customer, less than half of the organizations engaged in active Big Data initiatives are currently collecting and analyzing external sources of data, like social media. Via IBM News room

A new global report released today by IBM  and the Saïd Business School at the University of Oxford reveals that most Big Data initiatives currently being deployed by organizations are aimed at improving the customer experience. Yet, despite the strong focus on the customer, less than half of the organizations engaged in active Big Data initiatives are currently collecting and analyzing external sources of data, like social media. Via IBM News room

(via ibmsocialbiz)

  IBM Has Become a Publisher. Is It Any Good?
IBM has about 433,000 employees. To put things in perspective, that’s more than four times the amount of Microsoft’s workforce and 400,000 more than Google’s. It’s also about 427,000 more than The New York Times Co. has. If you believe that a substantial minority of the public can write reasonably well, then Big Blue has a fair shot at putting out a decent product.
The company has been testing that theory since 2005 or so. At the time, Twitter didn’t yet exist and Facebook was for college kids, so social media was synonymous with blogging. It turned out that many IBMers had the itch to write, which of course was a blessing and a curse to the company. A blessing because — free content! A curse because who knew exactly what these employees were going to actually write? Would consumers take their thoughts as word from IBM on high?
IBM decided on a sort of middle road: It encouraged employees to blog to their heart’s content, but it issues blogging guidelines, so they’d know what they couldn’t blog about. The guidelines, crowdsourced by IBM employees thanks to a wiki created by James Snell, a member of IBM’s software standards strategy group, and Ed Brill, a Lotus exec, draw on common sense (“Don’t pick fights, be the first to correct your own mistakes,” etc.) and are general enough to be adopted by other companies.
Since 2005, micro-blogging platforms like Facebook and Twitter have changed the medium in which IBM often communicates, but the company remains committed to blogging and is an especially enthusiastic user of Tumblr, though you can find IBMers on Instagram, Pinterest and any other up-and-coming social media site. “We have coverage across all of the social media platforms,” says John Rooney, program manager for innovation and collaboration at IBM. “We are a large content creator. What we are becoming very much is a social media publisher.” Indeed, the company now claims some 32,000 individual blogs from IBMers.

  IBM Has Become a Publisher. Is It Any Good?

IBM has about 433,000 employees. To put things in perspective, that’s more than four times the amount of Microsoft’s workforce and 400,000 more than Google’s. It’s also about 427,000 more than The New York Times Co. has. If you believe that a substantial minority of the public can write reasonably well, then Big Blue has a fair shot at putting out a decent product.

The company has been testing that theory since 2005 or so. At the time, Twitter didn’t yet exist and Facebook was for college kids, so social media was synonymous with blogging. It turned out that many IBMers had the itch to write, which of course was a blessing and a curse to the company. A blessing because — free content! A curse because who knew exactly what these employees were going to actually write? Would consumers take their thoughts as word from IBM on high?

IBM decided on a sort of middle road: It encouraged employees to blog to their heart’s content, but it issues blogging guidelines, so they’d know what they couldn’t blog about. The guidelines, crowdsourced by IBM employees thanks to a wiki created by James Snell, a member of IBM’s software standards strategy group, and Ed Brill, a Lotus exec, draw on common sense (“Don’t pick fights, be the first to correct your own mistakes,” etc.) and are general enough to be adopted by other companies.

Since 2005, micro-blogging platforms like Facebook and Twitter have changed the medium in which IBM often communicates, but the company remains committed to blogging and is an especially enthusiastic user of Tumblr, though you can find IBMers on Instagram, Pinterest and any other up-and-coming social media site. “We have coverage across all of the social media platforms,” says John Rooney, program manager for innovation and collaboration at IBM. “We are a large content creator. What we are becoming very much is a social media publisher.” Indeed, the company now claims some 32,000 individual blogs from IBMers.

CTIA Show Highlights Shift from Systems of People to Value

IBM’s SVP of Global Business Service Bridget van Kralingen notes that the final shift happening is from systems of people to systems of value. Companies will find in order to engage with today’s people, the enterprise and its character are inseparable.

(via ibmsocialbiz)

IBM updates its Connections social enterprise software, eyes analytics | ZDNet
IBM on Wednesday made the latest version of its Connections social enterprise software generally available with updated activity streams, more mobile support and analytics features.
The Connections software, technically Connections 4.0, includes the following:
A revamped activity stream for a consolidated social dashboard. The general idea is that users can act within the activity stream to approve travel requests and expenses among other items.
Support for Apple’s latest iPhone, which will be unveiled today, the iPad, Windows Phone and Android devices.
Trending topics within the enterprise and social network.
Integration with enterprise email and calendar tools.
On-premise and cloud delivery options. 
Many of these features were highlighted in our recent interview with Jeff Schick, IBM’s social software lead.
IBM is ranked the top social software vendor by IDC and Big Blue has been touting its large clients, including Primerica, LeasePlan, Bayer and other large companies. IBM also has built a network of 39,000 partners to build on top of Connections, which started as an internal collaboration tool before being productized.

IBM updates its Connections social enterprise software, eyes analytics | ZDNet

IBM on Wednesday made the latest version of its Connections social enterprise software generally available with updated activity streams, more mobile support and analytics features.

The Connections software, technically Connections 4.0, includes the following:

  • A revamped activity stream for a consolidated social dashboard. The general idea is that users can act within the activity stream to approve travel requests and expenses among other items.
  • Support for Apple’s latest iPhone, which will be unveiled today, the iPad, Windows Phone and Android devices.
  • Trending topics within the enterprise and social network.
  • Integration with enterprise email and calendar tools.
  • On-premise and cloud delivery options. 

Many of these features were highlighted in our recent interview with Jeff Schick, IBM’s social software lead.

IBM is ranked the top social software vendor by IDC and Big Blue has been touting its large clients, including Primerica, LeasePlan, Bayer and other large companies. IBM also has built a network of 39,000 partners to build on top of Connections, which started as an internal collaboration tool before being productized.

ibmsocialbiz:

Andrew is working an IBM internship with Extreme Blue. His team’s challenge: to build an application for the social media engagement platform HootSuite that surfaces social media analytics from IBM Cognos Consumer Insight social analytics solution. Via Business Analytics Blog 

ibmsocialbiz:

Andrew is working an IBM internship with Extreme Blue. His team’s challenge: to build an application for the social media engagement platform HootSuite that surfaces social media analytics from IBM Cognos Consumer Insight social analytics solution. Via Business Analytics Blog