The Social Business: Students, social influence and social media

IBM 2012 Global Student Study: almost half find social voice through social media

Social media is exposing students to alternative ideas, philosophies and life experiences. It is also giving them an opportunity to exert influence in a much more interconnected world.

  • 61 percent of students…

…using social technology as a business tool is unavoidable and, for many, a critical component for success. According to Forrester Research, the market opportunity for social enterprise apps is expected to grow at a rate of 61 percent through 2016.

So IBM made some calls—1,160 to be exact—to business and IT professionals to find out how their businesses were adopting, and adapting to, the social side of business. IBM found that across the board, companies are increasing their social technology investments, although it seems the reasons why remain a little foggy.

The survey revealed that while 46 percent of the organizations questioned increased their investments in social technologies in 2012, only 22 percent believed that managers are prepared to incorporate social tools and approaches into their daily practices.

Beyond Digital – Connecting media and entertainment to the future « A Smarter Planet Blog
By Saul Berman, Global Strategy Consulting Leader, IBM Global Business Services
The much heralded “connected consumer era” is no longer on the way; it has arrived. And as connectedness pervades our daily lives, we continue to crave even more. For example, a recent journal reported that people check their smart phones an average of 34 times per day, and more video is updated to YouTube in one month than the three major U.S. networks created in 60 years.
Recently IBM’s think tank, the Institute for Business Value, put on its anthropologist hat and surveyed more than 3,800 consumers in six countries (China, France, Germany, Japan, the UK and the US), compiling our findings in a new study called “Beyond Digital.”
Here’s some of what we uncovered:
Four new types of content consumption behaviors (Viewing on Demand, Non-Linear Viewing, Mobile Viewing and Social Consumption) Also known as “time-shifting,” Viewing on Demand is now the norm – especially in  the UK and the U.S. where more than half of the early adopters and mainstream consumers access online video whenever it suits their schedules through sites such as Hulu and Netflix, or via video on demand services through their home TVs.Three fourths of the adultswe surveyed are “Non-Linear Viewers,” admitting to surfing the web and texting while watching television. Mobile Viewing is also gaining traction, with more than 50 percent of early adopter and mainstream consumer respondents in Japan, the UK and the U.S. regularly accessing content on their smart phones or other portable devices. Social Consumption is also on the rise: across the global sample, 46 percent fall in this category — using digital content to communicate socially (via Facebook, LinkedIn, etc.).

Beyond Digital – Connecting media and entertainment to the future « A Smarter Planet Blog

By Saul Berman, Global Strategy Consulting Leader, IBM Global Business Services

The much heralded “connected consumer era” is no longer on the way; it has arrived. And as connectedness pervades our daily lives, we continue to crave even more. For example, a recent journal reported that people check their smart phones an average of 34 times per day, and more video is updated to YouTube in one month than the three major U.S. networks created in 60 years.

Recently IBM’s think tank, the Institute for Business Value, put on its anthropologist hat and surveyed more than 3,800 consumers in six countries (China, France, Germany, Japan, the UK and the US), compiling our findings in a new study called “Beyond Digital.”

Here’s some of what we uncovered:

  • Four new types of content consumption behaviors (Viewing on Demand, Non-Linear Viewing, Mobile Viewing and Social Consumption) Also known as “time-shifting,” Viewing on Demand is now the norm – especially in  the UK and the U.S. where more than half of the early adopters and mainstream consumers access online video whenever it suits their schedules through sites such as Hulu and Netflix, or via video on demand services through their home TVs.Description: http://asmarterplanet.com/wp-includes/js/tinymce/plugins/wordpress/img/trans.gifThree fourths of the adultswe surveyed are “Non-Linear Viewers,” admitting to surfing the web and texting while watching television. Mobile Viewing is also gaining traction, with more than 50 percent of early adopter and mainstream consumer respondents in Japan, the UK and the U.S. regularly accessing content on their smart phones or other portable devices. Social Consumption is also on the rise: across the global sample, 46 percent fall in this category — using digital content to communicate socially (via Facebook, LinkedIn, etc.).

Analyst Virtual Briefing | IBM Chief Marketing Officer Study

To introduce analysts to IBM’s first-ever CMO Study — "From Stretched to Strengthened" — IBM Global Business Services (GBS) Analyst Relations team held another first: a briefing of the study’s findings via the GBS Virtual Center, a 3D, voice-enabled and web-based collaboration complex, which you are welcome to visit and experience first hand.

The 3D briefing and Q&A session, hosted by GBS Analyst Relations Program Manager Michelle Henry, featured:

Study Executive Leader Peter Korsten

Study Director Carolyn Baird

Smarter Commerce Global Leader Paul Papas

The new venue was met with enthusiasm and excitement for future opportunities. One analyst commented, “Attended first ever IBM virtual analyst meeting to review #ibmcmo study. Great use of social media! Is this the future for analyst events?” 

You’re welcome to view & embed the video - and share your thoughts with us in comments here or via @asabiliaAR on Twitter. 

Executive summary Insights from more than 1,700 CMOs – read the Executive Summary

Mark you calendar and join our next vPanel interactive webcast, on the new ViVu platform.
Topic: Companies increasingly need to transform functions from operations to customer care via new digital techniques and technologies. But can they do this fast enough, and far enough, to keep pace with the growing power of their connected customers?
Panelists:
Ragna Bell -  (moderator) IBM Institute for Business Value, Strategy & Transformation Leader
Robin Carey - CEO, Social Media Today 
Saul Berman - IBM Global Business Services, Global Innovation & Growth Strategy Leader
Andrew McAfee - a principal research scientist at the Center for Digital Business in the MIT Sloan School of Management
Paul Papas -  IBM Global Business Services, Global Leader, Smarter Commerce
About the Global Business Services vPanel Series: vPanels are webcam-based interactive webcasts to foster dialogue between thought leaders and viewers. Viewers can participate via the integrate chat to share their views and questions. Subscribe to the series to sample past discussions and to be alerted to new ones.

Download the complete IBM Institute for Business Value study (1.30MB)

Mark you calendar and join our next vPanel interactive webcast, on the new ViVu platform.

Topic: Companies increasingly need to transform functions from operations to customer care via new digital techniques and technologies. But can they do this fast enough, and far enough, to keep pace with the growing power of their connected customers?

Panelists:

About the Global Business Services vPanel Series: vPanels are webcam-based interactive webcasts to foster dialogue between thought leaders and viewers. Viewers can participate via the integrate chat to share their views and questions. Subscribe to the series to sample past discussions and to be alerted to new ones.


Download the complete IBM Institute for Business Value study (1.30MB)

IBM Study: Electric Cars Stir Interest But Face Obstacles
Nearly one-fifth of drivers are likely to consider an electric vehicle 
Drivers reluctant to bear the cost of home charging

Many automobile industry executives believe that sales of traditional vehicles will peak before 2020 and are looking to electric-only vehicles (EVs) as one of the next hot products, but they will first have to address stringent consumer requirements about EV performance, recharging, and convenience, according to a new IBM (NYSE: IBM) survey of consumer attitudes and a recent study of auto industry executives.
Taken together, the two studies uncover significant differences between the automobile industry executives IBM spoke to and consumers on the factors motivating consumers to purchase electric vehicles, with auto execs placing greater emphasis than consumers on government incentives and oil prices. The executives were also skeptical of consumers’ willingness to pay a premium for green vehicles. 

IBM Study: Electric Cars Stir Interest But Face Obstacles

  • Nearly one-fifth of drivers are likely to consider an electric vehicle 
  • Drivers reluctant to bear the cost of home charging

Many automobile industry executives believe that sales of traditional vehicles will peak before 2020 and are looking to electric-only vehicles (EVs) as one of the next hot products, but they will first have to address stringent consumer requirements about EV performance, recharging, and convenience, according to a new IBM (NYSE: IBM) survey of consumer attitudes and a recent study of auto industry executives.

Taken together, the two studies uncover significant differences between the automobile industry executives IBM spoke to and consumers on the factors motivating consumers to purchase electric vehicles, with auto execs placing greater emphasis than consumers on government incentives and oil prices. The executives were also skeptical of consumers’ willingness to pay a premium for green vehicles. 

IBM –The wisdom of the cloud: Cloud computing in the life sciences industry
At its most basic level, cloud computing is the provision of an IT infrastructure for a group of users in different locations that allows them to share resources, software and information via the “cloud” that supports them. Most literature on cloud computing focuses on how it can help organizations save money and mobilize rapidly. Instead of building its own IT infrastructure, a company hands the task to a third party. The “tenant” company has access to its data and software over the Internet and pays only for what it uses.

IBM –The wisdom of the cloud: Cloud computing in the life sciences industry

At its most basic level, cloud computing is the provision of an IT infrastructure for a group of users in different locations that allows them to share resources, software and information via the “cloud” that supports them. Most literature on cloud computing focuses on how it can help organizations save money and mobilize rapidly. Instead of building its own IT infrastructure, a company hands the task to a third party. The “tenant” company has access to its data and software over the Internet and pays only for what it uses.

Catch the second (of four) 15-minute segments from our Dec. 9 interactive webcast on the future of the automotive industry and new models of mobility, smarter transportation.

About the Smart Leaders vPanel Series: vPanels are webcam-based interactive webcasts to foster dialogue between thought leaders and viewers. Subscribe to the series to sample past discussions and to be alerted to new ones. And visit Smarter Leaders Mobile on your smartphone for an integrated view of content about next generation leadership from Tumblr, Twitter, YouTube and more.

smarterleaders:

IBM  | The CEO Study Student Survey: Insights from Future Leaders
Based on what they say today, what will future leaders do differently from today’s CEOs? Given the complex world future leaders will inherit, how do the views of today’s students and CEOs compare in regard to the role of business leadership? According to a new global study of more than 3,600 students in college and graduate schools, the future leaders already have some distinct ideas based on their values about globalization and sustainability. This year, for the first time, we conducted a Global Student Study in conjunction with the Global CEO Study. Side by side, these two reports provide a view of leadership from different generations, and a glimpse of what leadership may look like in the future. Students’ perceptions have been profoundly shaped by the digital and interconnected world of their school years. What is the impact of those experiences? Given the world they inherited from previous generations, what do today’s students believe about the role of public and private organizations? Most importantly, when they become leaders themselves, what are they likely to do differently?
Download Global Student Study, Inheriting a  Complex World: Future Leaders Envision Sharing the Planet

smarterleaders:

IBM | The CEO Study Student Survey: Insights from Future Leaders

Based on what they say today, what will future leaders do differently from today’s CEOs? Given the complex world future leaders will inherit, how do the views of today’s students and CEOs compare in regard to the role of business leadership? According to a new global study of more than 3,600 students in college and graduate schools, the future leaders already have some distinct ideas based on their values about globalization and sustainability. This year, for the first time, we conducted a Global Student Study in conjunction with the Global CEO Study. Side by side, these two reports provide a view of leadership from different generations, and a glimpse of what leadership may look like in the future. Students’ perceptions have been profoundly shaped by the digital and interconnected world of their school years. What is the impact of those experiences? Given the world they inherited from previous generations, what do today’s students believe about the role of public and private organizations? Most importantly, when they become leaders themselves, what are they likely to do differently?

Download Global Student Study, Inheriting a Complex World: Future Leaders Envision Sharing the Planet

Watch live streaming video from newintelligence at livestream.com

Frank Kern, Senior Vice President, IBM Global Business Services, gives an overview on the 2010 CEO Study and the Webcast Series to build a global dialogue around the findings of this report, based on interviews with 1500 chief executives and public sector leaders, as well as research conducted with more than 3600 students worldwide