crowdcurator:

Blink
Blink is simply too good to be true. And while it’s not unusual for a crowd funded product to make enormous claims and under deliver, Blink earns a feature just because we want so desperately for it to deliver on what it promises.
Blink is a wireless home security system that has some serious appeal to it. It will ultimately provide live HD video streaming, temperature sensors, night vision, motion detection and more, and all without a monthly fee. But it’s the supposed 1 year battery life that’s raising the most eye brows in the comments section.
No firm answers on Nest or HomeKit support, but the creators talk of IFTTT integration after launch.
Back on Kickstarter

crowdcurator:

Blink

Blink is simply too good to be true. And while it’s not unusual for a crowd funded product to make enormous claims and under deliver, Blink earns a feature just because we want so desperately for it to deliver on what it promises.

Blink is a wireless home security system that has some serious appeal to it. It will ultimately provide live HD video streaming, temperature sensors, night vision, motion detection and more, and all without a monthly fee. But it’s the supposed 1 year battery life that’s raising the most eye brows in the comments section.

No firm answers on Nest or HomeKit support, but the creators talk of IFTTT integration after launch.

Back on Kickstarter

To start with, the IBM IoT Cloud Beta will enable you to:

Create an Organization
Register up to 10 devices to your Organization
Securely connect your devices to the service
Have devices send events to the cloud and receive commands from the cloud
Store device events for 7 days
Create API-Keys to access your data from applications in Bluemix or elsewhere

To start with, the IBM IoT Cloud Beta will enable you to:

  • Create an Organization
  • Register up to 10 devices to your Organization
  • Securely connect your devices to the service
  • Have devices send events to the cloud and receive commands from the cloud
  • Store device events for 7 days
  • Create API-Keys to access your data from applications in Bluemix or elsewhere

Jim Morrish Principal Analyst
“The fast-evolving mobile phone environment and declining technology prices have set the stage for traditional M2M services to make the leap into the consumer space.”

The roots of the emerging ‘Internet of Things’ (IoT) market lie in industrial machine-to-machine (M2M) systems. Historically, M2M monitoring was ideally suited to asset-intensive, complex processes that were spread over relatively wide areas. As the prices of M2M communications equipment have fallen, manufacturers have installed the technology in an increasing amount of consumer energy meters (known as ‘smart meters’), and have started to add it to a range of household equipment, cars and security systems.

The IoT has yet to become a mass-market proposition. All of the technologies and tools required to create the IoT are available, and at suitably low price points, but they have yet to be pulled together in a cohesive and user-friendly package, and the necessary scale has not been achieved.

Cheat  Sheet: The internet of things | Networks | silicon.com
The internet of things, you say? Sounds like an oxymoron to me. The internet of things - or IoT for short - is all about bringing the analogue (physical) world into the digital (virtual) sphere so that physical objects can be identified, tracked, located and even controlled online, in real-time. And what does the IoT mean? Lots and lots more lovely data. Tell me more… IoT describes a not-so-far-distant future reality towards which our increasingly wired and sensor-strewn society is accelerating. There are many names for this already: other terms you may have come across include: ubiquitous computing (or ubicomp), invisible computing, pervasive computing and even - somewhat inevitably - web 3.0. The gist is: couple ubiquitous wireless and cellular networks with everyday objects that have wireless sensors embedded in them et voila: there’s your internet of things - smart objects that can be identified by the tiny chips they contain. 


Cheat Sheet: The internet of things | Networks | silicon.com

The internet of things, you say? Sounds like an oxymoron to me. The internet of things - or IoT for short - is all about bringing the analogue (physical) world into the digital (virtual) sphere so that physical objects can be identified, tracked, located and even controlled online, in real-time. And what does the IoT mean? Lots and lots more lovely data. Tell me more… IoT describes a not-so-far-distant future reality towards which our increasingly wired and sensor-strewn society is accelerating. There are many names for this already: other terms you may have come across include: ubiquitous computing (or ubicomp), invisible computing, pervasive computing and even - somewhat inevitably - web 3.0. The gist is: couple ubiquitous wireless and cellular networks with everyday objects that have wireless sensors embedded in them et voila: there’s your internet of things - smart objects that can be identified by the tiny chips they contain. 

3 Ways Internet Of Things Works On Your Phone | ReadWriteWeb
When we write about Internet of Things we explain the latest in futuristic “sense and share” devices for your clothes, homes and cars. Yet when it comes to modern mobile, we don’t need to focus so much on what can be done in the future as much as what can be done right now. Our phones’ ability to “sense and share” is well established. Explaining what your phone can currently do is an ideal way to explain what everyday objects will be able to do once they become Internet of Things objects.
At a recent Google summit on wireless sensors, Deborah Estin, director of the Center for Embedded Network Sensing at UCLA spoke of three simple ways our phones already work the way the future Internet of Things will work. Estin’s presentation, Participatory Sensing: An Emerging Driver For The Multidimensional Internet, explains what we’ll one day be able to do for not only our own health but for the health of the world we live in.  

3 Ways Internet Of Things Works On Your Phone | ReadWriteWeb

When we write about Internet of Things we explain the latest in futuristic “sense and share” devices for your clothes, homes and cars. Yet when it comes to modern mobile, we don’t need to focus so much on what can be done in the future as much as what can be done right now. Our phones’ ability to “sense and share” is well established. Explaining what your phone can currently do is an ideal way to explain what everyday objects will be able to do once they become Internet of Things objects.

At a recent Google summit on wireless sensors, Deborah Estin, director of the Center for Embedded Network Sensing at UCLA spoke of three simple ways our phones already work the way the future Internet of Things will work. Estin’s presentation, Participatory Sensing: An Emerging Driver For The Multidimensional Internet, explains what we’ll one day be able to do for not only our own health but for the health of the world we live in.