smartercities:

When commuting in Mumbai, bring your smartphone | TheCityFix
Carpooling is not a new idea. In order to save money, reduce congestion, or simply use a High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lane, friends and neighbors have been sharing rides for a long time.
For a country like India, which is expected to become the most populous country in the world by 2025, and for which the number of cars on the road grows every year, solutions like car sharing can’t come too soon. As smartphone penetration increases across India, the solution to gridlocked traffic may lie in apps and other new technologies.
Metershare, a new app developed by students in Mumbai, India, takes ridesharing to the next level, encouraging strangers going the same direction to meet up in order to share a taxi or an auto-rickshaw. By encouraging users to share something other than a personal car, the app offers a solution to Mumbai’s congested streets.

smartercities:

When commuting in Mumbai, bring your smartphone | TheCityFix

Carpooling is not a new idea. In order to save money, reduce congestion, or simply use a High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lane, friends and neighbors have been sharing rides for a long time.

For a country like India, which is expected to become the most populous country in the world by 2025, and for which the number of cars on the road grows every year, solutions like car sharing can’t come too soon. As smartphone penetration increases across India, the solution to gridlocked traffic may lie in apps and other new technologies.

Metershare, a new app developed by students in Mumbai, India, takes ridesharing to the next level, encouraging strangers going the same direction to meet up in order to share a taxi or an auto-rickshaw. By encouraging users to share something other than a personal car, the app offers a solution to Mumbai’s congested streets.

ReadWrite – Ubislate 7Ci: Can This $20 Tablet Really Change The World?
In all the competitive battles that have defined the history of the technology revolution, one essential truth almost always determines the outcome: cheap and good enough beats awesome but expensive every time.
It happened when PCs beat out minicomputers (not to mention Macintosh’s). It happened when VHS killed Betamax. It happened when Linux pushed aside proprietary server operating systems. It’s happening now as Google’s Android overtakes Apple’s iOS.
Good Enough?
And it could be about to happen again with the Ubislate 7Ci tablet. This Android device is far from special in just about every respect. The specs are ordinary at best:
7-inch, 800 x 432 capacitive touchscreen
Android 4.04 Ice Cream Sandwich
1GHz Cortex A8 ARMv7 CPU
512MB RAM, 4GB storage
Wi-Fi (a version with GPRS cellular capability is also available)
VGA front-facing camera
Micro SD slot
Power, micro-USB, and headphone connectors
The speaker is tinny. The pictures are grainy and low-res, and the colors are off, too. The screen has to be held just so to be seen properly. Battery life is listed as a measly 3 hours, and in my tests the device couldn’t hold a charge more than a day or two no matter how little it was used. Performance is painfully slow for anyone spoiled by the latest tablets from Apple, Samsung, Microsoft and others. Things that should happen instantly take several seconds or more, and I experienced frequent hangups and glitches. 
But build quality seems solid, and the thing is perfectly portable. Most important, though, it works - and it’s being sold for just $20 in India.

ReadWrite – Ubislate 7Ci: Can This $20 Tablet Really Change The World?

In all the competitive battles that have defined the history of the technology revolution, one essential truth almost always determines the outcome: cheap and good enough beats awesome but expensive every time.

It happened when PCs beat out minicomputers (not to mention Macintosh’s). It happened when VHS killed Betamax. It happened when Linux pushed aside proprietary server operating systems. It’s happening now as Google’s Android overtakes Apple’s iOS.

Good Enough?

And it could be about to happen again with the Ubislate 7Ci tablet. This Android device is far from special in just about every respect. The specs are ordinary at best:

  • 7-inch, 800 x 432 capacitive touchscreen
  • Android 4.04 Ice Cream Sandwich
  • 1GHz Cortex A8 ARMv7 CPU
  • 512MB RAM, 4GB storage
  • Wi-Fi (a version with GPRS cellular capability is also available)
  • VGA front-facing camera
  • Micro SD slot
  • Power, micro-USB, and headphone connectors

The speaker is tinny. The pictures are grainy and low-res, and the colors are off, too. The screen has to be held just so to be seen properly. Battery life is listed as a measly 3 hours, and in my tests the device couldn’t hold a charge more than a day or two no matter how little it was used. Performance is painfully slow for anyone spoiled by the latest tablets from Apple, Samsung, Microsoft and others. Things that should happen instantly take several seconds or more, and I experienced frequent hangups and glitches. 

But build quality seems solid, and the thing is perfectly portable. Most important, though, it works - and it’s being sold for just $20 in India.

India’s sub-$50 Android tablet claims 1.4 million orders in two weeks — Engadget
How popular is the world cheapest tablet? Pretty darn popular, it seems. The Aakash has already notched up 1.4 million bookings since going up for sale on  December 14th, not massively surprising given the $41 (2,500 rupee)  price tag. An upgraded version is already planned for March, with three  new factories planned to each produce 75,000 new units per month. If a  sub-$50 tablet is still too expensive for your tastes, then you may be happy to hear that the price should still sink as low as $35 and could even be pushed as low as $10. At that price, we’ll take five.
Physorg

India’s sub-$50 Android tablet claims 1.4 million orders in two weeks — Engadget

How popular is the world cheapest tablet? Pretty darn popular, it seems. The Aakash has already notched up 1.4 million bookings since going up for sale on December 14th, not massively surprising given the $41 (2,500 rupee) price tag. An upgraded version is already planned for March, with three new factories planned to each produce 75,000 new units per month. If a sub-$50 tablet is still too expensive for your tastes, then you may be happy to hear that the price should still sink as low as $35 and could even be pushed as low as $10. At that price, we’ll take five.

Physorg

Will Cheap Computer Bridge India’s Digital Divide? : NPR
Indian students pose with the supercheap Aakash tablet computers, which  they received during the Oct. 5 product launch in New Delhi. The Indian  government intends to deliver 10 million tablets to college students  across India at a subsidized price of $35.

Will Cheap Computer Bridge India’s Digital Divide? : NPR

Indian students pose with the supercheap Aakash tablet computers, which they received during the Oct. 5 product launch in New Delhi. The Indian government intends to deliver 10 million tablets to college students across India at a subsidized price of $35.

IBM brings solar power to data centers | Green Tech - CNET News
A solar technician at IBM’s Bangalore, India research facility.
(Credit: IBM)
IBM is bringing electric power—in the form of solar panels—to data centers with trouble getting power in the first place.
The company tomorrow will detail a pilot project which couples solar  power with water-cooled servers that run on high-voltage direct-current.  The method results in about a ten percent energy savings by reducing  the losses that normally happen in converting from alternating power  from the grid to the direct current servers run on, according to Murali  Kota, the chief scientist of nanotechnology at IBM India who developed  the pilot as a side project.
That level of energy reduction is significant for large data centers  with many servers, but the implications of solar and servers are  potentially profound for places that don’t have access to reliable  power, Kota said.
A bank, for example, that wanted to set up a remote branch and operate a  data center could use solar power as a way to supplement power from the  grid and on-site generators. IBM plans to offer the system in custom  engagements next year. Clients in developing countries have already  shown an interest.
"Everybody is talking about getting connectivity from the grid. The  cities are already overloaded so they need ways to generate local  power," Kota said. "You can start connecting unconnected parts of the  world using this kind of system."

IBM brings solar power to data centers | Green Tech - CNET News

A solar technician at IBM’s Bangalore, India research facility.

(Credit: IBM)

IBM is bringing electric power—in the form of solar panels—to data centers with trouble getting power in the first place.

The company tomorrow will detail a pilot project which couples solar power with water-cooled servers that run on high-voltage direct-current. The method results in about a ten percent energy savings by reducing the losses that normally happen in converting from alternating power from the grid to the direct current servers run on, according to Murali Kota, the chief scientist of nanotechnology at IBM India who developed the pilot as a side project.

That level of energy reduction is significant for large data centers with many servers, but the implications of solar and servers are potentially profound for places that don’t have access to reliable power, Kota said.

A bank, for example, that wanted to set up a remote branch and operate a data center could use solar power as a way to supplement power from the grid and on-site generators. IBM plans to offer the system in custom engagements next year. Clients in developing countries have already shown an interest.

"Everybody is talking about getting connectivity from the grid. The cities are already overloaded so they need ways to generate local power," Kota said. "You can start connecting unconnected parts of the world using this kind of system."

Mobile Apps That Reward Impoverished Students With Food, Medicine | Fast Company
In exchange for taking small actions that might break the cycle of  poverty—like going to school—mPowering’s users earn points that can be  exchanged for important goods. The company was founded by veterans of  Apple and Salesforce.com.

Mobile Apps That Reward Impoverished Students With Food, Medicine | Fast Company

In exchange for taking small actions that might break the cycle of poverty—like going to school—mPowering’s users earn points that can be exchanged for important goods. The company was founded by veterans of Apple and Salesforce.com.