Carriers set to chip in $100M in Isis to take on Google | GigaOM

AT&T, Verizon and T-Mobile are reportedly poised to invest $100 million in their joint mobile payment venture called Isis, a near field communication-based contactless payment system that will do battle in the increasingly competitive mobile payments market. According to Bloomberg, the carriers are still determining exactly how much to invest based on Isis’ ability to obtain support from banks and merchants, but they could throw in a lot more money if the platform can gain momentum.
Isis will have to play catch-up with Google Wallet , the open NFC platform launched by Google, MasterCard and Citibank. That payment system was unveiled in May and is set to open to the public soon. Google Wallet lets people pay for things by waving their NFC-enabled Android phone at point-of-sale terminals that are equipped to handle MasterCard Paypass purchases. However, Google’s offering is limited right now to just the Nexus S from Sprint, and it hasn’t announced new credit card or banking partners beyond MasterCard and Citibank.
Isis, meanwhile, is backed by credit card companies MasterCard, Visa , American Expressand Discover. But the first trials won’t begin until next year in Salt Lake City and Austin, Texas. That will put it behind Google Wallet, though with few NFC-enabled devices available so far, it may not be that much of a disadvantage. But will consumers even embrace NFC payments on their handsets when the tech does become available? Questions about thesecurity, reliability and fees of mobile payments still suggest that adoption will be slow, at least initially.

Carriers set to chip in $100M in Isis to take on Google | GigaOM

AT&T, Verizon and T-Mobile are reportedly poised to invest $100 million in their joint mobile payment venture called Isis, a near field communication-based contactless payment system that will do battle in the increasingly competitive mobile payments market. According to Bloomberg, the carriers are still determining exactly how much to invest based on Isis’ ability to obtain support from banks and merchants, but they could throw in a lot more money if the platform can gain momentum.

Isis will have to play catch-up with Google Wallet the open NFC platform launched by Google, MasterCard and Citibank. That payment system was unveiled in May and is set to open to the public soon. Google Wallet lets people pay for things by waving their NFC-enabled Android phone at point-of-sale terminals that are equipped to handle MasterCard Paypass purchases. However, Google’s offering is limited right now to just the Nexus S from Sprint, and it hasn’t announced new credit card or banking partners beyond MasterCard and Citibank.

Isis, meanwhile, is backed by credit card companies MasterCard, Visa , American Expressand Discover. But the first trials won’t begin until next year in Salt Lake City and Austin, Texas. That will put it behind Google Wallet, though with few NFC-enabled devices available so far, it may not be that much of a disadvantage. But will consumers even embrace NFC payments on their handsets when the tech does become available? Questions about thesecurity, reliability and fees of mobile payments still suggest that adoption will be slow, at least initially.

The Internet of Things: Toolbox to help objects communicating via the Net
Increasingly, the things people use on a daily basis can be connected to  the Internet. An alarm clock not only rings, but can also switch on the  coffee machine while turning on the light. But what is needed to ensure  that the Internet of Things operates as efficiently as possible?
Thus far, the Internet has been an arena reserved for people. But now  more and more physical objects are being connected to the Internet: we  read emails on our mobile telephones, we have electricity meters that  report readings automatically, and pulse monitors and running shoes that  publish information about our daily jog directly on Facebook.
Tools for collaboration The Internet of Things will introduce new  smart objects to our homes. One challenge is to find effective solutions  to enable different products to work together. Currently no  standardised tools or distribution platforms exist in this area.
A group of Norwegian researchers have been addressing this issue. In  the research project Infrastructure for Integrated Services (ISIS) they  have created a platform for developing and distributing applications for  the Internet of Things. The platform encompasses a programming tool for  developers, called Arctis and the website ISIS Store for downloading  applications. The project has received funding from the Research Council  of Norway’s Large-scale Programme VERDIKT.
Source: ScienceDaily

The Internet of Things: Toolbox to help objects communicating via the Net

Increasingly, the things people use on a daily basis can be connected to the Internet. An alarm clock not only rings, but can also switch on the coffee machine while turning on the light. But what is needed to ensure that the Internet of Things operates as efficiently as possible?

Thus far, the Internet has been an arena reserved for people. But now more and more physical objects are being connected to the Internet: we read emails on our mobile telephones, we have electricity meters that report readings automatically, and pulse monitors and running shoes that publish information about our daily jog directly on Facebook.

Tools for collaboration The Internet of Things will introduce new smart objects to our homes. One challenge is to find effective solutions to enable different products to work together. Currently no standardised tools or distribution platforms exist in this area.

A group of Norwegian researchers have been addressing this issue. In the research project Infrastructure for Integrated Services (ISIS) they have created a platform for developing and distributing applications for the Internet of Things. The platform encompasses a programming tool for developers, called Arctis and the website ISIS Store for downloading applications. The project has received funding from the Research Council of Norway’s Large-scale Programme VERDIKT.

Source: ScienceDaily

Why Winning Over Merchants Will be Key To Mobile Payments | GigaOM
For mobile payments to soar, it doesn’t take just the creativity and  resources of carriers, financial institutions, start-ups and Web  players. The gobs of money spent on making mobile payments happen may be  for naught if merchants aren’t on board. And the industry is learning  that. That’s one of the key lessons absorbed by Michael Abbott, the CEO  of Isis, a mobile payment joint venture by Verizon Wireless , AT&T  and T-Mobile.
Abbott, who joined Isis in November after ten years as CMO of GE  Capital, said the carriers all considered their own payment services but  they realized after talking to merchants and businesses that they  didn’t want a bunch of competing options from the operators. So the  carriers banded together to create Isis,  which initially was designed to run on a new near field communication  (NFC) payment network. Then when they took their payment service to the  merchants, they were again told that they don’t want a separate payment  network apart from the big players like MasterCard and Visa. They wanted  a solution that works together. So Isis put aside plans for its own Discover-powered payment network and is now looking to partner with more credit card companies and banks. 

Why Winning Over Merchants Will be Key To Mobile Payments | GigaOM

For mobile payments to soar, it doesn’t take just the creativity and resources of carriers, financial institutions, start-ups and Web players. The gobs of money spent on making mobile payments happen may be for naught if merchants aren’t on board. And the industry is learning that. That’s one of the key lessons absorbed by Michael Abbott, the CEO of Isis, a mobile payment joint venture by Verizon Wireless , AT&T and T-Mobile.

Abbott, who joined Isis in November after ten years as CMO of GE Capital, said the carriers all considered their own payment services but they realized after talking to merchants and businesses that they didn’t want a bunch of competing options from the operators. So the carriers banded together to create Isis, which initially was designed to run on a new near field communication (NFC) payment network. Then when they took their payment service to the merchants, they were again told that they don’t want a separate payment network apart from the big players like MasterCard and Visa. They wanted a solution that works together. So Isis put aside plans for its own Discover-powered payment network and is now looking to partner with more credit card companies and banks. 

2009 PopTech Fellow Deb Levine founded ISIS – Internet Sexuality Information Services – in 2001 to promote sexual health. Using the web, mobile phones and other media, ISIS gives people private and convenient access to information on critical health issues like HIV prevention and unplanned pregnancies. (via PopTech: popcasts)