New 314 Acre Japanese Solar Plant to Power 22,000 Homes
Smartphone maker Kyocera recently launched the Kagoshima Nanatsujima Mega Solar Power Plant, a 70-megawatt facility that can generate enough electricity to power about 22,000 homes. The move comes as Japan struggles with energy sources as nuclear power plants were shut down after meltdowns hit Tokyo Electric Power Co.’s Fukushima plant in 2011.
Set on Kagoshima Bay, the sprawling Nanatsujima plant commands sweeping views of Sakurajima, an active stratovolcano that soars to 3,665 feet.  It has 290,000 solar panels and takes up about 314 acres, roughly three times the total area of Vatican City. Kyocera established the facility with six other firms as well as a company to run the plant. It will sell electricity generated to the local utility, Kyushu Electric Power Co.
(via Kyocera launches 70-megawatt solar plant, largest in Japan | Crave - CNET)

New 314 Acre Japanese Solar Plant to Power 22,000 Homes

Smartphone maker Kyocera recently launched the Kagoshima Nanatsujima Mega Solar Power Plant, a 70-megawatt facility that can generate enough electricity to power about 22,000 homes. The move comes as Japan struggles with energy sources as nuclear power plants were shut down after meltdowns hit Tokyo Electric Power Co.’s Fukushima plant in 2011.

Set on Kagoshima Bay, the sprawling Nanatsujima plant commands sweeping views of Sakurajima, an active stratovolcano that soars to 3,665 feet.  It has 290,000 solar panels and takes up about 314 acres, roughly three times the total area of Vatican City. Kyocera established the facility with six other firms as well as a company to run the plant. It will sell electricity generated to the local utility, Kyushu Electric Power Co.

(via Kyocera launches 70-megawatt solar plant, largest in Japan | Crave - CNET)

(via joshbyard)

From Japan, smartphone can detect radiation

Since the tsunami and subsequent nuclear disaster that shook Japan early in 2011, there have been a number of thoughtful innovations hoping to provide protection in the event of an emergency – from escape pods to shopping bags that double as safety helmets. Adding to this list, Japanese telecoms firm SoftBank has developed the Pantone 5 107SH smartphone, which features an in-built radiation detector. READ MORE…

From Japan, smartphone can detect radiation

Since the tsunami and subsequent nuclear disaster that shook Japan early in 2011, there have been a number of thoughtful innovations hoping to provide protection in the event of an emergency – from escape pods to shopping bags that double as safety helmets. Adding to this list, Japanese telecoms firm SoftBank has developed the Pantone 5 107SH smartphone, which features an in-built radiation detector. READ MORE…

Honda’s FCX Clarity can power a home for 6 days | The Car Tech blog - CNET Reviews
Honda equips an FCX Clarity with a mobile power supply system and reveals a new solar-powered hydrogen-fueling station in Japan.
A story from FuelCellToday shows how Honda has turned the FCX Clarity into a zero emissions electric generator on wheels. The auto manufacturer outfitted the hydrogen fuel cell vehicle with a mobile power supply system, enabling the car to provide 9 kilowatts of electricity continuously for more than seven hours on a full tank of hydrogen at peak generation. At the lower-generation rates needed to power a typical home in Japan, the FCX Clarity could provide electricity for six days.
Nissan and Mitsubishi also have vehicle-to-home power systems, albeit with smaller energy capacities. These systems can be used in emergency power outage situations or to offset the cost of electricity during peak use hours.

Honda’s FCX Clarity can power a home for 6 days | The Car Tech blog - CNET Reviews

Honda equips an FCX Clarity with a mobile power supply system and reveals a new solar-powered hydrogen-fueling station in Japan.

A story from FuelCellToday shows how Honda has turned the FCX Clarity into a zero emissions electric generator on wheels. The auto manufacturer outfitted the hydrogen fuel cell vehicle with a mobile power supply system, enabling the car to provide 9 kilowatts of electricity continuously for more than seven hours on a full tank of hydrogen at peak generation. At the lower-generation rates needed to power a typical home in Japan, the FCX Clarity could provide electricity for six days.

Nissan and Mitsubishi also have vehicle-to-home power systems, albeit with smaller energy capacities. These systems can be used in emergency power outage situations or to offset the cost of electricity during peak use hours.


 
DeconGel is able to completely encapsulate anything that’s not nailed down (on the microscopic level) to any surface that it’s applied to. This includes dirt of course, but also microscopic radioactive particles and other contaminants and pollutants. This blue goop is cleaning up Japan’s radiation)

via 2020:

DeconGel is able to completely encapsulate anything that’s not nailed down (on the microscopic level) to any surface that it’s applied to. This includes dirt of course, but also microscopic radioactive particles and other contaminants and pollutants. This blue goop is cleaning up Japan’s radiation)

via 2020:

The Technium: Crowdmapping Radiation
Kevin Kelly comments on the crowdmapping of radiation. It is again interesting to note how the collective connected world is a learning system who becomes better at crowdsourcing for every disaster. It is also interesting to note how vastly different people are collaborating for a single purpose regardless if they are activists, nerds or just engaged.
via futuramb

The Technium: Crowdmapping Radiation

Kevin Kelly comments on the crowdmapping of radiation. It is again interesting to note how the collective connected world is a learning system who becomes better at crowdsourcing for every disaster. It is also interesting to note how vastly different people are collaborating for a single purpose regardless if they are activists, nerds or just engaged.

via futuramb

Japan to Build 10,000 EV Charging Station/Vending Machine Hybrids by 2012 
Japan is notorious for its fascination with vending machines — as of 2008, there were 5.5 million of them across the nation. And these aren’t merely the candy bar and soda variety, either — Japan has vending machines that sell live crabs, grow lettuce, arecovered in moss, and dispense smart cars. And by this time next year, it will have 10,000 vending machines that charge electric cars.
via electricpower: TreeHugger

Japan to Build 10,000 EV Charging Station/Vending Machine Hybrids by 2012 

Japan is notorious for its fascination with vending machines — as of 2008, there were 5.5 million of them across the nation. And these aren’t merely the candy bar and soda variety, either — Japan has vending machines that sell live crabsgrow lettuce, arecovered in moss, and dispense smart cars. And by this time next year, it will have 10,000 vending machines that charge electric cars.

via electricpower: TreeHugger

Japan company developing sensors for seniors
Source: Physorg.com
Japan’s top telecoms company is developing a simple wristwatch-like device to monitor the well-being of the elderly, part of a growing effort to improve care of the old in a nation whose population is aging faster than anywhere else.

The device, worn like a watch, has a built-in camera, microphone andaccelerometer, which measure the pace and direction of hand movements to discern what wearers are doing - from brushing their teeth to vacuuming or making coffee.
In a demonstration at Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corp.’s research facility, the test subject’s movements were collected as data that popped up as lines on a graph - with each kind of activity showing up as different patterns of lines. Using this technology, what an elderly person is doing during each hour of the day can be shown on a chart.

Japan company developing sensors for seniors

Source: Physorg.com

Japan’s top telecoms company is developing a simple wristwatch-like device to monitor the well-being of the elderly, part of a growing effort to improve care of the old in a nation whose population is aging faster than anywhere else.

The device, worn like a watch, has a built-in camera, microphone andaccelerometer, which measure the pace and direction of hand movements to discern what wearers are doing - from brushing their teeth to vacuuming or making coffee.

In a demonstration at Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corp.’s research facility, the test subject’s movements were collected as data that popped up as lines on a graph - with each kind of activity showing up as different patterns of lines. Using this technology, what an elderly person is doing during each hour of the day can be shown on a chart.

electricpower:

Solar energy and lithium-ion batteries: Sanyo now builds “green” homes in Japan
Sanyo is already being considered Japan’s “greenest” brand in the consumer electronics field (which is the main reason Panasonic is about to acquire the company), but them building complete, eco-friendly buildings is certainly new. Sanyo Homes [JP], a wholly-owned subsidiary, will start marketing all-electric homes with lithium ion batteries providing back up power to Japanese customers as early as tomorrow. (Sorry for the tiny picture, which shows a CGI-model of how these houses look like.)
Each house will be equipped with a 3.78kw solar energy system. But buyers will also get 1.57kw Sanyo lithium ion batteries to make sure they’ll have access to eco-friendly energy during the night or during days without enough sunlight. Sanyo Homes says that each of their houses will come with ten LED light fixtures running on direct-current power to minimize energy loss and a solar-powered heat-pump water heater.
The company expects these extras to boost the prices for their homes to some extent, but says buyers will be able to recoup the initial plus in investment over time and will also get financial from the Japanese government. A 132sqm Sanyo home, for example, will sell for $355,000, which is $62,000 more than a comparable conventional one (but only eco-friendly homes will get government subsidies, in this case $30,000).
Via Nikkei [registration required, paid subscription]
(via Crunchgear)

electricpower:

Solar energy and lithium-ion batteries: Sanyo now builds “green” homes in Japan

Sanyo is already being considered Japan’s “greenest” brand in the consumer electronics field (which is the main reason Panasonic is about to acquire the company), but them building complete, eco-friendly buildings is certainly new. Sanyo Homes [JP], a wholly-owned subsidiary, will start marketing all-electric homes with lithium ion batteries providing back up power to Japanese customers as early as tomorrow. (Sorry for the tiny picture, which shows a CGI-model of how these houses look like.)

Each house will be equipped with a 3.78kw solar energy system. But buyers will also get 1.57kw Sanyo lithium ion batteries to make sure they’ll have access to eco-friendly energy during the night or during days without enough sunlight. Sanyo Homes says that each of their houses will come with ten LED light fixtures running on direct-current power to minimize energy loss and a solar-powered heat-pump water heater.

The company expects these extras to boost the prices for their homes to some extent, but says buyers will be able to recoup the initial plus in investment over time and will also get financial from the Japanese government. A 132sqm Sanyo home, for example, will sell for $355,000, which is $62,000 more than a comparable conventional one (but only eco-friendly homes will get government subsidies, in this case $30,000).

Via Nikkei [registration required, paid subscription]

(via Crunchgear)