Six Kickstarter Projects for Cities | This Big City
Kickstarter is the world’s largest funding platform for creative projects. It has funded a diverse array of endeavors ranging from indie films, music, stage shows and comics to journalism, video games and food-related projects. Urban enthusiasts and public spacemakers are also embracing Kickstarter to gather financial support for projects that enhance city life and raise awareness about urban issues.
Here are some Kickstarter projects from 2012 with an urban focus:

Six Kickstarter Projects for Cities | This Big City

Kickstarter is the world’s largest funding platform for creative projects. It has funded a diverse array of endeavors ranging from indie films, music, stage shows and comics to journalism, video games and food-related projects. Urban enthusiasts and public spacemakers are also embracing Kickstarter to gather financial support for projects that enhance city life and raise awareness about urban issues.

Here are some Kickstarter projects from 2012 with an urban focus:

Ubi plug-mounted Android device gives your phone eyes and ears in the home | Android Central
A Kickstarter project out of Toronto called Ubi recently reached its funding goal for a tiny Android-powered computer that plugs directly into a power socket. It’s riddled with sensors and hooks up to the local Wi-Fi network so it can push out notifications to your phone about the room’s conditions - lights, temperature, sound, movement… Even humidity. It’s got a full-sized USB and headphone jack and RF and Bluetooth capabilities for added connectivity. There’s an LED light on the back plus speakers so the Ubi can do some communicating of its own, plus a decent amount of horsepower under the hood to keep things running (800 MHz processor, 1 GB of RAM). The unit itself will ship with Android 4.1 Jelly Bean and is going to have its own app ecosystem with a handful launching with the device.
Voice-enabled Internet search
Speakerphone
Indicator light (light changing based on events, e.g. weather, stock, email)
Home speaker system with sound piping
Virtual assistant (audio calendar, feed reader, podcast etc)
Voice memos
Alarm clock
Intercom system
Baby monitor
Noise pollution monitor
Controlling the climate of your home perfectly (through web enabled thermostats like Nest) 

Ubi plug-mounted Android device gives your phone eyes and ears in the home | Android Central

A Kickstarter project out of Toronto called Ubi recently reached its funding goal for a tiny Android-powered computer that plugs directly into a power socket. It’s riddled with sensors and hooks up to the local Wi-Fi network so it can push out notifications to your phone about the room’s conditions - lights, temperature, sound, movement… Even humidity. It’s got a full-sized USB and headphone jack and RF and Bluetooth capabilities for added connectivity. There’s an LED light on the back plus speakers so the Ubi can do some communicating of its own, plus a decent amount of horsepower under the hood to keep things running (800 MHz processor, 1 GB of RAM). The unit itself will ship with Android 4.1 Jelly Bean and is going to have its own app ecosystem with a handful launching with the device.

  • Voice-enabled Internet search
  • Speakerphone
  • Indicator light (light changing based on events, e.g. weather, stock, email)
  • Home speaker system with sound piping
  • Virtual assistant (audio calendar, feed reader, podcast etc)
  • Voice memos
  • Alarm clock
  • Intercom system
  • Baby monitor
  • Noise pollution monitor
  • Controlling the climate of your home perfectly (through web enabled thermostats like Nest) 

GROWING CITIES is a feature-length documentary that examines the role of urban farming in America and asks how much power it has to revitalize our cities and change the way we eat.The film follows two friends on their journey across the country as they meet the men and women who are challenging the way this country grows and distributes its food, one vacant city lot, rooftop garden, and backyard chicken coop at a time. 

Along the way they learn that this grassroots movement takes many forms – from those growing food in their backyards to activists seeking a meaningful alternative to the industrial food system, and more.  At its core, the film asks people to re-imagine what’s possible in urban settings and consider creatingGROWING CITIES of their own—places that are healthier, more sustainable, and socially just

WHAT WE’RE DOING:

We need to raise at least $35,000 by May 12th to prepare for an early 2013 release.

Growing A Museum by F. Marek Modzelewski — Kickstarter

Growing (Literally) A Contemporary Art Museum 

Overview

For this project, I will plant a field of wheat that will be harvested, turned into strawbales —a safe, green, and proven construction material — that will be used to build a museum of contemporary art.  The field  that supplies the wheat, will in turn become the grounds for the museum. 

Ninja Blocks: Connect your world with the web. by Ninja Blocks — Kickstarter

The internet of things for the rest of us.

Follow us on Facebook or Twitter.

Want to bridge the things in your life with the web? Maybe you want to get an alert when your friends are playing on Xbox Live, or send an SMS to your phone when someone is at your front door. Even if you’re an electronics expert, or a programming prodigy, these are complex, finicky projects. Ninja Blocks puts aside the complexity of electronics, networking, and coding and allows you to focus on creating.

Ninja Cloud

This is the Internet of Things the way it should be: Ninja Cloud is seamlessly integrated into your Ninja Blocks, allowing them to easily listen and talk to web services such as Twitter, Facebook, Dropbox, Weather and more.

How it all works

Ninja Blocks are simple but powerful open source hardware backed by an amazing web service called Ninja Cloud that allows your Ninja Block to talk to your favorite web apps. 

Each Ninja Block comes with an RGB LED and built-in temperature sensor and accelerometer. Four expansion ports and a regular USB port allow you to add further inputs and outputs. 

Ninja Cloud allows you to control your Ninja Blocks without writing a single line of code.

Kickstarting Urban Renewal with an Underground Park

A Kickstarter campaign is seeking to transform a defunct trolley terminal in Manhattan into a public space. After about a week the project founders, Dan Barasch and James Ramsey, have already raised 60 percent of what they need to make the “Delancey Underground” a reality. 

Read More on GOOD
via good:

Kickstarting Urban Renewal with an Underground Park

A Kickstarter campaign is seeking to transform a defunct trolley terminal in Manhattan into a public space. After about a week the project founders, Dan Barasch and James Ramsey, have already raised 60 percent of what they need to make the “Delancey Underground” a reality. 

Read More on GOOD

via good:

The wonderful Lydia Dean Pilcher,  my friend and consummate filmmaker (Darjelling Limited, Vanity Fair, Jesus’ Son)  has launched a Kickstarter campaign to finish raising money for a dramatic teen girl feature film, “The Sisterhood of Night.”

The team has just a few weeks to reach their goal for the film’s $100,000 budget. I’m pitching in to this very worthy project today, and hope you will to.

Just follow this link:

Here’s more about the project:

When I met Caryn Waechter and Marilyn Fu, and read the first screenplay for “Sisterhood,” I fell in love with their irrepressible energy and their quest to find beauty, fun, and meaning in the dark edges of life.  We worked together on the short story written by Pulitzer-prize winning author, Steven Millhauser, further adapting it from an 80’s setting to our contemporary digital world.

This project has really possessed me as a mom of two digital natives.  I constantly wonder what will be our retrospective of our kids experience having grown up living on Facebook in a crowd, and launching the text generation?   And the wild west of the Internet, its potential for casual, breathtaking cruelty, and its capacity to hide a bully’s identity, all present slippery new challenges to this transitional generation.

Our film encourages teen girls and parents to embrace what makes each of us unique and different, and to use the digital realm to share, inspire and create.

Please check out our Kickstarter campaign. Kickstarter is a site for people who like to “fund and follow creativity.” The way it works is that if the project doesn’t reach its goal we won’t get any of what’s pledged…please click on the link  to read more and watch our 2 minute video — and please contribute if you can, whatever you can, (you get rewards for doing it!) and feel free to share wildly.

It takes less then a minute to donate, use your amazon account, and every dollar is a vote for the creative spirit! With our Kickstarter campaign, we are seeking to build a network to support the multiple platforms for the storytelling of “The Sisterhood of Night,” to raise money to start filming, and explore our ideas for ways of using the internet to build positivity.

Tap into your inner free spirit! Join us and and be a part of our adventure!

jackmason:

TouchFire: The Screen-Top Keyboard for iPad by Steve Isaac & Brad Melmon — Kickstarter

The TouchFire basically looks like one of those plastic protective keyboard covers you can buy for a MacBook, but with magnets attached so it can secure itself to the right spot on an iPad in landscape orientation.

I have mixed feelings on iPad keyboards. I’ve spent a bit of time getting used to this brave new world of touchscreen typing, and I can hit 60-85 wpm with pretty high accuracy now. So I enjoy the minimal, gadget-less portability of the iPad, and I can do an increasing amount of my work on it.

But I also recognize that not everyone wants to get good at touchscreen typing, or they just prefer traditional, physical keyboard options. In that light, the TouchFire looks pretty interesting, and it’s definitely the most minimal iPad keyboard I’ve seen. It doesn’t hurt that Isaac and Melmon are ex-engineers from Sun and IBM, either. [Smarter Planet emphasis, N.B.]

It looks like a clever design, and I’d certainly like to try one. As of this writing, the TouchFire Kickstarter project has received enough funding to bring the product to market, but you can still pledge whatever you want or pick from a few packages to secure a preorder and score other perks.

via chartier:

(via chartier)

Steve Daniels, a recent Brown graduate now with IBM Research’s Social Computing Group, has focused on how people create, adapt, and use technology in resource-constrained environments. Prior to joining IBM, Steve’s research focused on systems of production among African makers, from which he published the book Making Do: Innovation in Kenya’s Informal Economy. Steve is the founder of the Better World by Design conference, an annual summit organized by students at Brown University and the Rhode Island School of Design to engage creative students and professionals with the challenge of reshaping our built environment.

Makeshift Magazine by Steve Daniels — Kickstarter

About this project

Makeshift is a quarterly magazine and multimedia website about creativity in unlikely places, from the favelas of Rio to the alleys of Delhi. These are environments where resources may be scarce, but where ingenuity is used incessantly for survival, enterprise, and a self-expression. Makeshift is about people, the things they make, and the context they make them in.

Much of our coverage will involve remote emerging markets, but we recognize that creativity is hidden everywhere. We want to place you, our readers, in locations you will likely never get to see and reveal street-level ingenuity you might not expect. We want to show the minutiae of how massive areas function, thrive, and simply survive. We want to reveal the complex inner workings below surface understanding.

mkshft.org
twitter.com/mkshftmag

facebook.com/mkshftmag

Why a print magazine?

We’re told that print journalism is meant to be a thing of the past, yet independent magazines with rich, creative content are undergoing a renaissance. As we focus on a hands-on topic, we want to be able to put a real product in your hands, as well as offer an online multimedia presence. 

When are you launching?

We’ll be launching on September 30 with a launch party and exhibition in Providence, RI at the Better World by Design conference. Some of our prizes include admission to the conference, but the Friday night party is open to the public for a nominal fee.

Why should I fund you?

To move Makeshift forward, editors and contributors will continue to scour the globe for individuals, organizations, and regions buzzing with enterprising spirit. But to do this, we need… money!

Thus far, Makeshift has been produced on a shoestring. We wanted to prove we could produce something from nothing before moving forward. So, in Makeshift spirit, we hustled some money together, paid our contributors the best we could, worked lots of late nights and created Issue One on “Re-culture: Reuse, repair, and recycle at the grassroots”. We are stoked on this issue and thankful for all the hard work and support of our contributors. But, with a little financial backing, we can take this progress leaps and bounds forwards.

What will you do with the $15,000?  

Money raised through Kickstarter will go directly to building the infrastructure of magazine to make it a sustainable venture. All dollars within our $15,000 goal will directly allow us to set up and pay for subscription services, create an advertising/accounting department, purchase relevant software and supplies, and cover printing costs. This may not sound sexy, but this is the backbone we need to expand the creativity and reach of the magazine.