Kinect Installation Lets Visitors Control A Living Human Cell [Video] - PSFK
Living Cell is an interactive installation created by design agency Clever Franke for the research group Eriba Institute.
The data visualisation work allows you to physically step inside a cell, walk around its organelles and influence its processes. Visitors can discover information about specific parts of the cell by walking into the cell and touching the part of interest. The lifetime of the cell is approximately an hour; if there is no interference from the visitors eventually the cell will die and be born again.

Kinect Installation Lets Visitors Control A Living Human Cell [Video] - PSFK

Living Cell is an interactive installation created by design agency Clever Franke for the research group Eriba Institute.

The data visualisation work allows you to physically step inside a cell, walk around its organelles and influence its processes. Visitors can discover information about specific parts of the cell by walking into the cell and touching the part of interest. The lifetime of the cell is approximately an hour; if there is no interference from the visitors eventually the cell will die and be born again.

Flutter Is Like Kinect For Your Computer’s Webcam
Kinect may not be the best way to play games on an Xbox 360, in spite of the fact that some games for the platform are pretty good. However, one place Kinect does shine is in controlling the Xbox interface. It features all kinds of cool gestures that make it easy to control the console without touching the controller. Wouldn’t it be awesome if you could get functionality like that on your Mac? With Flutter it’s actually possible, and it’s easier than you might think to get it up and running.
Of course, Flutter is not as deep as Kinect, as it lacks the hardware and depth sensing technologies. However, it’s a very useful tool for listening to music and watching videos, as it allows you to skip songs, rewind, fast forward, play, and pause – all with simple gestures. Instead of digging through open windows to find and pause music, you can simply perform a gesture, and save yourself some valuable time. Plus, it feels really cool stopping music with a gesture, like something out of a sci-fi movie.

Flutter Is Like Kinect For Your Computer’s Webcam

Kinect may not be the best way to play games on an Xbox 360, in spite of the fact that some games for the platform are pretty good. However, one place Kinect does shine is in controlling the Xbox interface. It features all kinds of cool gestures that make it easy to control the console without touching the controller. Wouldn’t it be awesome if you could get functionality like that on your Mac? With Flutter it’s actually possible, and it’s easier than you might think to get it up and running.

Of course, Flutter is not as deep as Kinect, as it lacks the hardware and depth sensing technologies. However, it’s a very useful tool for listening to music and watching videos, as it allows you to skip songs, rewind, fast forward, play, and pause – all with simple gestures. Instead of digging through open windows to find and pause music, you can simply perform a gesture, and save yourself some valuable time. Plus, it feels really cool stopping music with a gesture, like something out of a sci-fi movie.

Video: Next-gen Kinect sensor.

The sensor inside Kinect was created by PrimeSense, who demonstrate the next generation model called Capri in this video.

Capri is 1/10 the size of previous models, and the company says “we have been able to improve on all aspects of the system” in the device, which can be integrated into tablets and smartphones.

Microsoft is actually only one customer using the system, and does not licence it exclusively. Other companies also using the technology include iRobot, Matterport, and Asus

(via 8bitfuture)

South Korea’s Live Park uses RFID and Kinect to bring your Holodeck fantasies one step nearer | Engadget
. Located near Seoul, Live Park uses  3D video, holograms and augmented reality, interacting with RFID wrist  bands and Kinect sensors to stitch together a continuous immersive  story. You (and your avatar!) have 65 attractions, over seven themed  zones, and the world’s biggest interactive 360 degree stereoscopic theater to wave, jump and shout your way through. Two years and $13  million in the making, Live Park’s creator d’strict is now looking to  license the concept out internationally, with locations in China and  Singapore already earmarked.

South Korea’s Live Park uses RFID and Kinect to bring your Holodeck fantasies one step nearer | Engadget

. Located near Seoul, Live Park uses 3D video, holograms and augmented reality, interacting with RFID wrist bands and Kinect sensors to stitch together a continuous immersive story. You (and your avatar!) have 65 attractions, over seven themed zones, and the world’s biggest interactive 360 degree stereoscopic theater to wave, jump and shout your way through. Two years and $13 million in the making, Live Park’s creator d’strict is now looking to license the concept out internationally, with locations in China and Singapore already earmarked.

Scientists Hack Kinect to Study Glaciers and Asteroids | Wired Science | Wired.com
Last summer, Ken Mankoff shimmied through zero degree water and mud  into a small cavern underneath Rieperbreen Glacier in Svalbard, Norway,  holding a Microsoft Kinect wrapped inside a waterproof bag.
Using the little toy, originally meant as a motion-sensing device for  the Xbox 360 video game console, Mankoff scanned the cave floor in 3D.  During the summer, water from lakes on the glacier’s surface had gushed  through the channel he was sitting in. The Kinect was going to provide a  better understanding of its size and roughness, which could help  researchers predict how the ice above would flow toward the sea.
“I’ve always enjoyed repurposing cheap devices, doing things that you’re not supposed to do with them,” said Mankoff,  a NASA funded Ph.D. student at the University of California, Santa Cruz  studying ice and ocean interactions. “You know, the hacker ideals.”
He is currently a bit of an evangelist for the Kinect, trying to get  scientist interested in using the device, which can record very accurate  3D data in visible and infrared wavelengths.

Scientists Hack Kinect to Study Glaciers and Asteroids | Wired Science | Wired.com

Last summer, Ken Mankoff shimmied through zero degree water and mud into a small cavern underneath Rieperbreen Glacier in Svalbard, Norway, holding a Microsoft Kinect wrapped inside a waterproof bag.

Using the little toy, originally meant as a motion-sensing device for the Xbox 360 video game console, Mankoff scanned the cave floor in 3D. During the summer, water from lakes on the glacier’s surface had gushed through the channel he was sitting in. The Kinect was going to provide a better understanding of its size and roughness, which could help researchers predict how the ice above would flow toward the sea.

“I’ve always enjoyed repurposing cheap devices, doing things that you’re not supposed to do with them,” said Mankoff, a NASA funded Ph.D. student at the University of California, Santa Cruz studying ice and ocean interactions. “You know, the hacker ideals.”

He is currently a bit of an evangelist for the Kinect, trying to get scientist interested in using the device, which can record very accurate 3D data in visible and infrared wavelengths.


Kinect Hacked For 3-D Scanning Of Archaeology Site
University of California, San Diego students will be going to Jordan soon to take part in an archaeological dig that’s decidely futuristic: As they uncover artifacts and structures in the soil, they’ll be using high-quality 3-D scanning to record accurate positional details—rich data that could be incredibly useful in the future. Instead of using expensive and complex imaging systems like LIDAR, however, the team will use a hacked Microsoft Kinect to do the job for them.
Full Story: Fast Company

via emergentfutures:

Kinect Hacked For 3-D Scanning Of Archaeology Site

University of California, San Diego students will be going to Jordan soon to take part in an archaeological dig that’s decidely futuristic: As they uncover artifacts and structures in the soil, they’ll be using high-quality 3-D scanning to record accurate positional details—rich data that could be incredibly useful in the future. Instead of using expensive and complex imaging systems like LIDAR, however, the team will use a hacked Microsoft Kinect to do the job for them.

Full Story: Fast Company

via emergentfutures: