Worlds Smallest LED is a Single Molecule
By coaxing light out of a single polymer molecule, researchers have made the world’s tiniest light-emitting diode.
This work is part of an interdisciplinary effort to make molecular scale electronic devices, which hold the potential for creating smaller but more powerful and energy-efficient computers. Guillaume Schull and his colleagues at the University of Strasbourg in France made the device with the conducting polymer polythiophene. They used a scanning tunneling microscope tip to locate and grab a single polythiophene molecule lying on a gold substrate. Then they pulled up the tip to suspend the molecule like a wire between the tip and the substrate.
The researchers report in the journalPhysical Review Letters that when they applied a voltage across the molecule, they were able to measure a nanoampere-scale current passing through it and to record light emitted from it.
(via First Single-Molecule LED - IEEE Spectrum)

Worlds Smallest LED is a Single Molecule

By coaxing light out of a single polymer molecule, researchers have made the world’s tiniest light-emitting diode.

This work is part of an interdisciplinary effort to make molecular scale electronic devices, which hold the potential for creating smaller but more powerful and energy-efficient computers. Guillaume Schull and his colleagues at the University of Strasbourg in France made the device with the conducting polymer polythiophene. They used a scanning tunneling microscope tip to locate and grab a single polythiophene molecule lying on a gold substrate. Then they pulled up the tip to suspend the molecule like a wire between the tip and the substrate.

The researchers report in the journalPhysical Review Letters that when they applied a voltage across the molecule, they were able to measure a nanoampere-scale current passing through it and to record light emitted from it.

(via First Single-Molecule LED - IEEE Spectrum)

(via joshbyard)

The technological advances transforming “Edison’s 130-year-old industry” promise to revolutionize the way light is integrated in our homes, workplaces, and cities.

As “the last industrial-age analog technology” is digitized, Felicity Barringer looks at “the fundamental rethinking of lighting now under way in research labs, executive offices and investor conferences.”

"Innovations on the horizon range from smart lampposts that can sense gas hazards to lights harnessed for office productivity or even to cure jet lag. Digital lighting based on light-emitting diodes — LEDs — offers the opportunity to flit beams delicately across stages like the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge — creating a light sculpture more elegant than the garish marketers’ light shows on display in Times Square, Piccadilly Circus and the Shibuya district in Tokyo."

She explains other possible applications, such as lampposts that function as “nodes in a smart network that illuminate spaces, visually monitor them, sense heat and communicate with other nodes and human monitors.”

"James Highgate, an expert on the new technology who runs an annual LED industry conference, sees a transition period ahead ‘for the next three to five years, until the eight billion sockets in the U.S. get filled’ with LEDs. ‘Some people will never change,’ he added. ‘They’ll be in the alleys buying 100-watt incandescents.’”

LED lights could become network devices, too | CNET News
Fraunhofer Institute has demonstrated how conventional LED lighting could be used to send and receive data to laptops or smartphones, with speeds up to 3Gbps.

Today, you’ve got wireless networks that use radio waves and you’ve got optical networks that use light traveling in tiny glass fibers. Tomorrow, if Fraunhofer Institute research comes to fruition, a combination of the two could turn living-room lights into network devices.
The German applied-research lab has developed wireless networking that uses rapidly blinking LEDs to transmit data through the air. The technology can send data at speeds up to 1 gigabit per second — and by using three colors of light, triple that data rate is possible, Fraunhofer said.

LED lights could become network devices, too | CNET News

Fraunhofer Institute has demonstrated how conventional LED lighting could be used to send and receive data to laptops or smartphones, with speeds up to 3Gbps.

Today, you’ve got wireless networks that use radio waves and you’ve got optical networks that use light traveling in tiny glass fibers. Tomorrow, if Fraunhofer Institute research comes to fruition, a combination of the two could turn living-room lights into network devices.

The German applied-research lab has developed wireless networking that uses rapidly blinking LEDs to transmit data through the air. The technology can send data at speeds up to 1 gigabit per second — and by using three colors of light, triple that data rate is possible, Fraunhofer said.

Cheaper LED Bulbs Make It Easier to Switch Lights - NYTimes.com
LEDs last about 25 times as long as incandescents and three times as long as CFLs; we’re talking maybe 25,000 hours of light. Install one today, and you may not own your house, or even live, long enough to see it burn out. (Actually, LED bulbs generally don’t burn out at all; they just get dimmer.)
You know how hot incandescent bulbs become. That’s because they convert only 5 to 10 percent of your electricity into light; they waste the rest as heat. LED bulbs are far more efficient. They convert 60 percent of their electricity into light, so they consume far less electricity. You pay less, you pollute less.

Cheaper LED Bulbs Make It Easier to Switch Lights - NYTimes.com

LEDs last about 25 times as long as incandescents and three times as long as CFLs; we’re talking maybe 25,000 hours of light. Install one today, and you may not own your house, or even live, long enough to see it burn out. (Actually, LED bulbs generally don’t burn out at all; they just get dimmer.)

You know how hot incandescent bulbs become. That’s because they convert only 5 to 10 percent of your electricity into light; they waste the rest as heat. LED bulbs are far more efficient. They convert 60 percent of their electricity into light, so they consume far less electricity. You pay less, you pollute less.

LIFX: The Light Bulb Reinvented by Phil Bosua — Kickstarter

LIFX is the smartest light bulb you’ve ever experienced. It’s a wifi-enabled, energy efficient, multi-colored bulb that you control with your iPhone or Android. LIFX gives you unprecedented control of your lights, reduces your energy costs, lasts up to 25 years and delivers an amazing range of experiences we think you’ll love.

Intelligent lighting holds promise for efficient lighting networks | EDN
At the recent Designing with LEDs Workshop, a keynote panel of experts addressed the emerging topic of intelligent lighting. Here are some highlights of the discussion.

Intelligent lighting holds promise for efficient lighting networks | EDN

At the recent Designing with LEDs Workshop, a keynote panel of experts addressed the emerging topic of intelligent lighting. Here are some highlights of the discussion.

 60-watt LED bulb to break $15 mark, Lighting Science says | CNET News
 Lighting Science Group and Dixon Technologies India today touted an LED light bulb equivalent to a 60-watt incandescent that they say will hit store shelves with a price below $15.

The omnidirectional LED bulb, in the traditional A19 shape of household incandescent light bulbs, will become available in India by the end of the year and worldwide, including in the U.S., early in 2012, the companies said. It’s the first in an expected series of products, including streetlights and industrial fixtures, that Lighting Science and Dixon plan to jointly manufacture and distribute.
Prices for LED bulbs meant to replace incandescents have been trending downward, but 60-watt equivalents typically have been priced at about $40 apiece. Advantages of LED bulbs include lower energy use and longer life.

 60-watt LED bulb to break $15 mark, Lighting Science says | CNET News

 Lighting Science Group and Dixon Technologies India today touted an LED light bulb equivalent to a 60-watt incandescent that they say will hit store shelves with a price below $15.

The omnidirectional LED bulb, in the traditional A19 shape of household incandescent light bulbs, will become available in India by the end of the year and worldwide, including in the U.S., early in 2012, the companies said. It’s the first in an expected series of products, including streetlights and industrial fixtures, that Lighting Science and Dixon plan to jointly manufacture and distribute.

Prices for LED bulbs meant to replace incandescents have been trending downward, but 60-watt equivalents typically have been priced at about $40 apiece. Advantages of LED bulbs include lower energy use and longer life.



Transmitting high-speed data via LED room lights | KurzweilAI
Scientists from the Fraunhofer Institute for Telecommunications, Heinrich Hertz Institute (HHI) in Berlin have developed a new high-speed data transmission technology for video data.
Using an optical WLAN, the scientists were able to transfer data at a rate of 100 megabits per second over a ten square meters area without any loss, by modulating white LEDs in the ceiling.
The scientists were able to transfer four videos at HD quality to four different laptops at the same time. A simple photodiode on the laptop or other devices acts as a receiver.One disadvantage is that when something gets between the light and the photodiode, the transfer is impaired.
The new transmission technology is suitable for hospitals, where high data rates are required, but radio transmissions are not allowed — it could allow for controlling wireless surgical robots or sending x-ray images. In airplanes, passenger could view their own entertainment program on a display, saving aircraft manufacturers the cost and weight of miles of cables

Transmitting high-speed data via LED room lights | KurzweilAI

Scientists from the Fraunhofer Institute for Telecommunications, Heinrich Hertz Institute (HHI) in Berlin have developed a new high-speed data transmission technology for video data.

Using an optical WLAN, the scientists were able to transfer data at a rate of 100 megabits per second over a ten square meters area without any loss, by modulating white LEDs in the ceiling.

The scientists were able to transfer four videos at HD quality to four different laptops at the same time. A simple photodiode on the laptop or other devices acts as a receiver.One disadvantage is that when something gets between the light and the photodiode, the transfer is impaired.

The new transmission technology is suitable for hospitals, where high data rates are required, but radio transmissions are not allowed — it could allow for controlling wireless surgical robots or sending x-ray images. In airplanes, passenger could view their own entertainment program on a display, saving aircraft manufacturers the cost and weight of miles of cables

Budget LEDs debut on Amazon
Lighting manufacturer Lighting Science Group announced yesterday it  will begin selling low-cost LED lightbulbs on Amazon.com beginning  today.
The company’s A19 omnidirectional 8.5-watt bulb (40-watt  equivalent) will sell for $21.98, and is only the first in a line of  low-budget LED bulbs planned for sale at the online superstore,  according to Lighting Science Group.
The company says its bulbs will last up to 23 years, and are 76 percent more efficient than a standard incandescent bulb.
"Lighting  accounts for more than 18 percent of the average U.S. household’s  energy bill—that’s because incandescent bulbs are essentially space  heaters that give off a little bit of light," Lighting Science Group CEO  Rich Weinberg said in a statement.
Source: CNET Green Tech blog

Budget LEDs debut on Amazon

Lighting manufacturer Lighting Science Group announced yesterday it will begin selling low-cost LED lightbulbs on Amazon.com beginning today.

The company’s A19 omnidirectional 8.5-watt bulb (40-watt equivalent) will sell for $21.98, and is only the first in a line of low-budget LED bulbs planned for sale at the online superstore, according to Lighting Science Group.

The company says its bulbs will last up to 23 years, and are 76 percent more efficient than a standard incandescent bulb.

"Lighting accounts for more than 18 percent of the average U.S. household’s energy bill—that’s because incandescent bulbs are essentially space heaters that give off a little bit of light," Lighting Science Group CEO Rich Weinberg said in a statement.

Source: CNET Green Tech blog