Patient Data-Sharing Is Started By Big Medical Groups 
The ideal of computerizing patient records is captured in the words behind the government’s aspirational acronym, N.H.I.N., for Nationwide Health Information Network.
The vision includes not only the efficient collection and use of  digitized patient records to help physicians make smarter, more  cost-effective diagnoses, but also the sharing of information by  far-flung doctors and hospitals. A person walks into a clinic in  Phoenix, say, and, with permission, her records from her hometown  physician’s office in San Francisco are efficiently summoned with a  mouse-click.
Across much of the country, that ambitious vision lies well in the  future. After all, only about one quarter of the nation’s doctors even  use computerized patient records today. The Obama administration is  offering billions of dollars in incentives over the next five years — up  to $44,000 per physician — to accelerate the adoption of electronic  health records.
But five leading medical groups — pioneers in the use of electronic  health records — are announcing on Wednesday a project intended to  exchange patient information. It is intended as an elite forerunner of  the national health information network, spanning several states and  millions of patients.
The five are Geisinger Health System, Kaiser Permanente, Mayo Clinic, Intermountain Healthcare and Group Health Cooperative. They are calling their project the Care Connectivity Consortium.
Source: NY Times

Patient Data-Sharing Is Started By Big Medical Groups

The ideal of computerizing patient records is captured in the words behind the government’s aspirational acronym, N.H.I.N., for Nationwide Health Information Network.

The vision includes not only the efficient collection and use of digitized patient records to help physicians make smarter, more cost-effective diagnoses, but also the sharing of information by far-flung doctors and hospitals. A person walks into a clinic in Phoenix, say, and, with permission, her records from her hometown physician’s office in San Francisco are efficiently summoned with a mouse-click.

Across much of the country, that ambitious vision lies well in the future. After all, only about one quarter of the nation’s doctors even use computerized patient records today. The Obama administration is offering billions of dollars in incentives over the next five years — up to $44,000 per physician — to accelerate the adoption of electronic health records.

But five leading medical groups — pioneers in the use of electronic health records — are announcing on Wednesday a project intended to exchange patient information. It is intended as an elite forerunner of the national health information network, spanning several states and millions of patients.

The five are Geisinger Health System, Kaiser Permanente, Mayo Clinic, Intermountain Healthcare and Group Health Cooperative. They are calling their project the Care Connectivity Consortium.

Source: NY Times

Irving Wladawsky-Berger: Designing a Smart Healthcare System
On October 1 and 2 IBM held its second global Smarter Cities conference in New York City. The first such conference was held in Berlin this past June, and the third will be held in Shanghai next year. As was the case with Berlin, the New York Smarter Cities event had a very impressive agenda. It included talks by IBM Chairman and CEO Sam Palmisano, New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg, and Melody Barnes, Director of the White House Domestic Policy Council. The agenda also included panels with governors, mayors, and leaders of cultural institutions. In addition, there were break-out discussions to enable participants to share their experiences on what it takes to build a smarter city in six key areas: transportation, education, public safety, energy and utilities, government services and healthcare. I helped organize and moderated the healthcare session. Our panel included Denis Cortese - CEO and President of the Mayo Clinic; Ronald Paulus - Chief Technology and Innovation Officer at the Geisinger Health System; Chris Coburn - Executive Director of Innovations at the Cleveland Clinic; and Armando Ahued Ortega - Health Secretary of Mexico City.

Irving Wladawsky-Berger: Designing a Smart Healthcare System

On October 1 and 2 IBM held its second global Smarter Cities conference in New York City. The first such conference was held in Berlin this past June, and the third will be held in Shanghai next year. As was the case with Berlin, the New York Smarter Cities event had a very impressive agenda. It included talks by IBM Chairman and CEO Sam Palmisano, New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg, and Melody Barnes, Director of the White House Domestic Policy Council. The agenda also included panels with governors, mayors, and leaders of cultural institutions. In addition, there were break-out discussions to enable participants to share their experiences on what it takes to build a smarter city in six key areas: transportation, education, public safety, energy and utilities, government services and healthcare. I helped organize and moderated the healthcare session. Our panel included Denis Cortese - CEO and President of the Mayo Clinic; Ronald Paulus - Chief Technology and Innovation Officer at the Geisinger Health System; Chris Coburn - Executive Director of Innovations at the Cleveland Clinic; and Armando Ahued Ortega - Health Secretary of Mexico City.