Microsoft to push further development of ‘memory cube’.
Microsoft joined the Hybrid Memory Cube Consortium earlier this month, which already includes high profile companies Samsung and IBM. Together the group is trying to advance the technology which uses stacks of DRAM memory combined together with a logic layer on top to control and optimize the memory. Traditionally memory controllers are intergrated into other parts of computers, but by combining them into the logic layer of the memory cube, higher speeds can be achieved along with lower energy consumption.
According to the Consortium, the memory cube could provide 15x the performance of DDR3 memory (which is found in most new computers today), while utilizing an amazing 70% less energy per bit than DDR3.
The group hopes to have 2 and 4 Gigabyte versions of the cube available early next year, although it’s unclear if those would simply be testing versions for developers or a finished product for mass market. They are also working on an interface for the cube to work with mobile devices, where power consumption is particularly critical. Intel is also rumoured to be considering joining the consortium.
8bitfuture:

Microsoft to push further development of ‘memory cube’.

Microsoft joined the Hybrid Memory Cube Consortium earlier this month, which already includes high profile companies Samsung and IBM. Together the group is trying to advance the technology which uses stacks of DRAM memory combined together with a logic layer on top to control and optimize the memory. Traditionally memory controllers are intergrated into other parts of computers, but by combining them into the logic layer of the memory cube, higher speeds can be achieved along with lower energy consumption.

According to the Consortium, the memory cube could provide 15x the performance of DDR3 memory (which is found in most new computers today), while utilizing an amazing 70% less energy per bit than DDR3.

The group hopes to have 2 and 4 Gigabyte versions of the cube available early next year, although it’s unclear if those would simply be testing versions for developers or a finished product for mass market. They are also working on an interface for the cube to work with mobile devices, where power consumption is particularly critical. Intel is also rumoured to be considering joining the consortium.

8bitfuture:

(via 8bitfuture)

Enterprise 2.0 Is Growing Up - WSJ
Social networking tools keep flowing into large companies, but the road map for implementation is still on the drawing board.
The business opportunity continues to lure major software companies,  as indicated by the fact that Adobe, Avaya and Oracle set up booths for  the first time at the Enterprise 2.0 Conference,  now in its seventh year. They joined other big players such as IBM,  Microsoft and Cisco at the Boston event this week along with  venture-backed companies such as Jive Software.
While most big organizations have some Enterprise 2.0 users companies  adopting such tools wholesale are still a minority, said one of the  leading authorities on the trend, Andrew McAfee, principal research  scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The big  opportunity, he said in an interview, is to standardize the technology  and bake it into the enterprise.

In a keynote address at the conference, McAfee identified a potential  threat to Enterprise 2.0: bosses who still subscribe to the heads-down,  cubicle mentality, and the technology behind Watson, IBM’s  Jeopardy-playing computer. Watson’s ability to process unrelated data  will enable such executives to extract all sorts of useful information  about employees working in isolation without the need for social  networking.

Enterprise 2.0 Is Growing Up - WSJ

Social networking tools keep flowing into large companies, but the road map for implementation is still on the drawing board.

The business opportunity continues to lure major software companies, as indicated by the fact that Adobe, Avaya and Oracle set up booths for the first time at the Enterprise 2.0 Conference, now in its seventh year. They joined other big players such as IBM, Microsoft and Cisco at the Boston event this week along with venture-backed companies such as Jive Software.

While most big organizations have some Enterprise 2.0 users companies adopting such tools wholesale are still a minority, said one of the leading authorities on the trend, Andrew McAfee, principal research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The big opportunity, he said in an interview, is to standardize the technology and bake it into the enterprise.

In a keynote address at the conference, McAfee identified a potential threat to Enterprise 2.0: bosses who still subscribe to the heads-down, cubicle mentality, and the technology behind Watson, IBM’s Jeopardy-playing computer. Watson’s ability to process unrelated data will enable such executives to extract all sorts of useful information about employees working in isolation without the need for social networking.