Baltimore Concert Venues to Try Reusable RFID Wristbands Instead of Tickets - RFID Journal

MissionTix is providing wristbands with built-in RFID tags that venue operators can read via an Android-based NFC-enabled smartphone and a cloud-based software application.

Starting in June, concert goers at two Baltimore music venues will have the option of purchasing reusable RFID-enabled wristbands instead of tickets. The system enables concert promoters to validate tickets electronically using a Near Field Communication (NFC)-enabled phone—Google's Samsung Galaxy Nexus—and an application loaded onto the phone that accesses a cloud-based server, on which is stored information regarding the tickets. 



The service is being marketed by MissionTix, a Baltimore ticketing service that is employing NFC wristbands, the codeREADr application and hosted back-end software provided by Boston media content company Skycore. Although NFC-enabled ticketing for concerts and festivals is not a new concept, MissionTix’ version features a reusable silicon wristband that a consumer could load and reload with tickets for participating venues. Therefore, individuals attending concerts at one location could have the tickets validated there, and then use the same wristbands at another place and time. MissionTix envisions the solution being utilized not only for concerts, but eventually by merchants, enabling users to load a prepaid account and use the wristband to pay for purchases.   

Smarter Energy  Outlets

Authentication Outlet Newly Developed

— Realized by combination of the contactless IC card technology and the new technology “RFID Over Power Line” —

Sony has developed an authentication outlet that can manage and allow electricity use by identifying a user or device (or both) based on authentication. This new technology aims at an outlet, an infrastructure that electricity always flows through when used. Using this outlet, the user can actively control and manage power consumption on a user basis as well as on a device basis.

Concept movie: New Authentication Outlet (by Sony)

Scientists Print Cheap RFID Tags On Paper | TechWeekEurope UK
Technology could make RFID tags cheap enough to replace barcodes in the future
A way to print Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) chips right onto paper has been discovered by a team of scientists from University of Montpellier.
The  technique uses a thermal evaporation process to deposit of thin  aluminium coil antennas on sheets of paper which can later be used to  create packaging or printed material. Researchers claim that this works  out to be cheaper than any other method of  producing RFID tags,  allowing the technology to replace both barcodes and QR codes.

Scientists Print Cheap RFID Tags On Paper | TechWeekEurope UK

Technology could make RFID tags cheap enough to replace barcodes in the future

A way to print Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) chips right onto paper has been discovered by a team of scientists from University of Montpellier.

The technique uses a thermal evaporation process to deposit of thin aluminium coil antennas on sheets of paper which can later be used to create packaging or printed material. Researchers claim that this works out to be cheaper than any other method of  producing RFID tags, allowing the technology to replace both barcodes and QR codes.

Carriers set to chip in $100M in Isis to take on Google | GigaOM

AT&T, Verizon and T-Mobile are reportedly poised to invest $100 million in their joint mobile payment venture called Isis, a near field communication-based contactless payment system that will do battle in the increasingly competitive mobile payments market. According to Bloomberg, the carriers are still determining exactly how much to invest based on Isis’ ability to obtain support from banks and merchants, but they could throw in a lot more money if the platform can gain momentum.
Isis will have to play catch-up with Google Wallet , the open NFC platform launched by Google, MasterCard and Citibank. That payment system was unveiled in May and is set to open to the public soon. Google Wallet lets people pay for things by waving their NFC-enabled Android phone at point-of-sale terminals that are equipped to handle MasterCard Paypass purchases. However, Google’s offering is limited right now to just the Nexus S from Sprint, and it hasn’t announced new credit card or banking partners beyond MasterCard and Citibank.
Isis, meanwhile, is backed by credit card companies MasterCard, Visa , American Expressand Discover. But the first trials won’t begin until next year in Salt Lake City and Austin, Texas. That will put it behind Google Wallet, though with few NFC-enabled devices available so far, it may not be that much of a disadvantage. But will consumers even embrace NFC payments on their handsets when the tech does become available? Questions about thesecurity, reliability and fees of mobile payments still suggest that adoption will be slow, at least initially.

Carriers set to chip in $100M in Isis to take on Google | GigaOM

AT&T, Verizon and T-Mobile are reportedly poised to invest $100 million in their joint mobile payment venture called Isis, a near field communication-based contactless payment system that will do battle in the increasingly competitive mobile payments market. According to Bloomberg, the carriers are still determining exactly how much to invest based on Isis’ ability to obtain support from banks and merchants, but they could throw in a lot more money if the platform can gain momentum.

Isis will have to play catch-up with Google Wallet the open NFC platform launched by Google, MasterCard and Citibank. That payment system was unveiled in May and is set to open to the public soon. Google Wallet lets people pay for things by waving their NFC-enabled Android phone at point-of-sale terminals that are equipped to handle MasterCard Paypass purchases. However, Google’s offering is limited right now to just the Nexus S from Sprint, and it hasn’t announced new credit card or banking partners beyond MasterCard and Citibank.

Isis, meanwhile, is backed by credit card companies MasterCard, Visa , American Expressand Discover. But the first trials won’t begin until next year in Salt Lake City and Austin, Texas. That will put it behind Google Wallet, though with few NFC-enabled devices available so far, it may not be that much of a disadvantage. But will consumers even embrace NFC payments on their handsets when the tech does become available? Questions about thesecurity, reliability and fees of mobile payments still suggest that adoption will be slow, at least initially.

Google CEO Eric Schmidt said Gingerbread, the upcoming update to Android that will roll out in the next few weeks, will include support for near field communications, making it possible for users to soon tap their phone and use it as a credit card. Android Will Roll Out NFC Support in Gingerbread | GigaOM

Google CEO Eric Schmidt said Gingerbread, the upcoming update to Android that will roll out in the next few weeks, will include support for near field communications, making it possible for users to soon tap their phone and use it as a credit card. Android Will Roll Out NFC Support in Gingerbread | GigaOM

MicroSD Card Brings NFC to Phones for Credit Card Companies, Banks - RFID Journal
Since early this summer, two credit-card companies have been conducting in-house tests of an RFID module that plugs into a mobile phone’s microSD memory card slot, thereby turning a cell phone into a Near Field Communication (NFC) device that can make payments, act as a loyalty card and download information from RFID tags embedded in smart posters.

MicroSD Card Brings NFC to Phones for Credit Card Companies, Banks - RFID Journal

Since early this summer, two credit-card companies have been conducting in-house tests of an RFID module that plugs into a mobile phone’s microSD memory card slot, thereby turning a cell phone into a Near Field Communication (NFC) device that can make payments, act as a loyalty card and download information from RFID tags embedded in smart posters.