Northwestern, IBM collaborate on business analytics courses - AnalyticBridge

Northwestern University and IBM are collaborating on new business and technology curricula to help students gain the latest skills in business analytics. The new courses of study, Masters of Science degree programs with analytics concentrations in the McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science and the School of Continuing Studies, will better prepare students and current professionals who are seeking new analytics skills for today’s competitive job market.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that there will be a 24 percent increase in demand for professionals with management analysis skills over the next eight years. The need for this specialized talent is being fueled by an increased use of business analytics by companies to better understand the explosion of data generated online, via social networks and mobile devices, or through real time sensors. With so much data residing within, and shared across, these digital sources, organizations are seeking new ways to understand, measure, act and even predict outcomes based on customer and social sentiment.

The demand for new higher education programs such as those at Northwestern illustrates the evolution of analytics. Once considered an area of focus for technology majors, that has moved beyond computers science and is now a required competency across businesses from finance and IT to human resources and marketing.

Future gadget batteries could last 10 times longer | GigaOm
Batteries continue to be the bane of mobile devices, but research done at Northwestern University could change that with longer lasting batteries that charge in minutes, not hours.  The new science shouldn’t increase the size of batteries, but instead  modifies the chemical reaction that takes place inside lithium-ion power  packs, allowing for 10 times the capacity, says PC Mag.  Don’t run out to the store looking for these batteries just yet,  though: They’re not expected to hit the market for 3 to 5 years.
According to Northwestern’s Professor Harold Kung, the longer-lasting  batteries take advantage of two new processes. First, the number of  lithium-ion atoms in the battery’s electrode are boosted by using  silicon in place of carbon between sheets of graphene in the battery. It  sounds complicated, but the gist is this: Silicon works 24 times more  efficiently with lithium ions compared to carbon, which is used in  traditional batteries.
Second, the research team scored the graphine sheets with microscopic  holes, allowing the lithium ions to travel faster within the battery.  These techniques improve both the recharge time and density of lithium  ions, which equates to longer-lasting batteries with fast recharge  times; perhaps as little as 15 minutes.

Future gadget batteries could last 10 times longer | GigaOm

Batteries continue to be the bane of mobile devices, but research done at Northwestern University could change that with longer lasting batteries that charge in minutes, not hours. The new science shouldn’t increase the size of batteries, but instead modifies the chemical reaction that takes place inside lithium-ion power packs, allowing for 10 times the capacity, says PC Mag. Don’t run out to the store looking for these batteries just yet, though: They’re not expected to hit the market for 3 to 5 years.

According to Northwestern’s Professor Harold Kung, the longer-lasting batteries take advantage of two new processes. First, the number of lithium-ion atoms in the battery’s electrode are boosted by using silicon in place of carbon between sheets of graphene in the battery. It sounds complicated, but the gist is this: Silicon works 24 times more efficiently with lithium ions compared to carbon, which is used in traditional batteries.

Second, the research team scored the graphine sheets with microscopic holes, allowing the lithium ions to travel faster within the battery. These techniques improve both the recharge time and density of lithium ions, which equates to longer-lasting batteries with fast recharge times; perhaps as little as 15 minutes.

Future computers that modify themselves
Scientists at Northwestern University have developed a new nanomaterial that can “steer” electrical currents. The development could lead to a computer that can simply reconfigure its internal wiring to become an entirely different device, based on changing needs. 
Full Story: Singularity Hub
emergentfutures:

Future computers that modify themselves

Scientists at Northwestern University have developed a new nanomaterial that can “steer” electrical currents. The development could lead to a computer that can simply reconfigure its internal wiring to become an entirely different device, based on changing needs.

Full Story: Singularity Hub

emergentfutures: