What the internet of things can learn from Minecraft and Lemmings — GigaOM

Once we have a home full of connected devices do we really want to individually manage all of them? Mike Kuniavsky, a principal in the Innovation Services Group at PARC, explains in this weeks podcast how we’re going to have to think differently about programming devices for the internet of things. Devices will need to know what they contain and how those elements might contribute to a certain scenario in the home.

For example when you want to watch a movie, you shouldn’t have to program 6 different devices in your home to tell them what they should do when you toggle on your movie setting, your devices should have some sense of what they are capable of and how to enter a set mode. As he did in his chat in February at our San Francisco Internet of Things meetup, Kuniavsky, likened this device behavior to video games like Minecraft or Lemmings, where preset general behaviors determines how the game unfolded as opposed to rigid and specific actions. He explains all this and more in the podcast. Check it out.

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Printable transistors usher in ‘internet of things’ | WSNblog
Thinfilm, a Norwegian developer of printable memory, has co-announced  with California’s PARC a development that takes a big step towards the  day when every manufactured object will report in to the internet.
Yes, the “internet of things” – the buzzword of the decade.
Thinfilm and PARC‘s  breakthrough is a technology that can print not only memory onto, well,  thin films, but can now also print transistors to address and manage  that memory.
Since 2006, Thinfilm has been producing low-capacity read/write printable memory, which has been used in such applications as personalized toys and games.
How low is “low-capacity”? Twenty bits – but although that may sound  meager, know that Thinfilm’s current products aren’t intended to store  an HD video of Laurence of Arabia, but instead, to hold identification and personalization information.
And to do so cheaply. Very cheaply. A few cents per unit cheaply.
Up until Friday’s announcement, Thinfilm’s non-volatile,  ferroelectric memory was completely passive – it just sat there, holding  those 20 bits in its memory cells. To be rewritten or read, it needed  to be accessed by an external device which used one access pad for each  memory cell.

Printable transistors usher in ‘internet of things’ | WSNblog

Thinfilm, a Norwegian developer of printable memory, has co-announced with California’s PARC a development that takes a big step towards the day when every manufactured object will report in to the internet.

Yes, the “internet of things” – the buzzword of the decade.

Thinfilm and PARC‘s breakthrough is a technology that can print not only memory onto, well, thin films, but can now also print transistors to address and manage that memory.

Since 2006, Thinfilm has been producing low-capacity read/write printable memory, which has been used in such applications as personalized toys and games.

How low is “low-capacity”? Twenty bits – but although that may sound meager, know that Thinfilm’s current products aren’t intended to store an HD video of Laurence of Arabia, but instead, to hold identification and personalization information.

And to do so cheaply. Very cheaply. A few cents per unit cheaply.

Up until Friday’s announcement, Thinfilm’s non-volatile, ferroelectric memory was completely passive – it just sat there, holding those 20 bits in its memory cells. To be rewritten or read, it needed to be accessed by an external device which used one access pad for each memory cell.