Is It Now Better To Start A Tech Company In NYC Than San Francisco? - PSFK
Is New York City the new Silicon Valley? This the question Roger Wu, a startup co-founder, is proposing in his recent article on Quartz. Although reports do show that successful startups in the Valley are valued nearly 40 times more than those based in New York. However, a closer at other factors such as turnover of revenue and risk.
Wu draws from sources like the New Tech City report, and Statistic Brain, that Silicon Valley has a “larger number of more risky” companies, whereas the “overall composition of New York companies is less risky.” According to the Startup Genome Report:

Is It Now Better To Start A Tech Company In NYC Than San Francisco? - PSFK

Is New York City the new Silicon Valley? This the question Roger Wu, a startup co-founder, is proposing in his recent article on Quartz. Although reports do show that successful startups in the Valley are valued nearly 40 times more than those based in New York. However, a closer at other factors such as turnover of revenue and risk.

Wu draws from sources like the New Tech City report, and Statistic Brain, that Silicon Valley has a “larger number of more risky” companies, whereas the “overall composition of New York companies is less risky.” According to the Startup Genome Report:

 New “Better Streets” Website Helps Residents Untangle City Bureaucracy | Streetsblog San Francisco
The San Francisco Better Streets Program launched a new website this week to provide a central source of information to help residents procure street improvements like traffic-calming measures, parklets, bike corrals, plantings, art installations, sidewalk fixtures, and permits for car-free events in their neighborhood.
The website, sfbetterstreets.org, “combines all the city’s guidelines, permit requirements, and resources for public space development onto one site, giving the user a handy step-by-step approach toward improving San Francisco’s streets,” the Planning Department said in a release.
Launched as a collaboration of the Planning Department, Department of Public Works, SF Public Utilities Commission, and the SFMTA, the site should help spread awareness of the street improvements available to residents and guide them through the city’s bureaucratic processes.

 New “Better Streets” Website Helps Residents Untangle City Bureaucracy | Streetsblog San Francisco

The San Francisco Better Streets Program launched a new website this week to provide a central source of information to help residents procure street improvements like traffic-calming measures, parklets, bike corrals, plantings, art installations, sidewalk fixtures, and permits for car-free events in their neighborhood.

The website, sfbetterstreets.org, “combines all the city’s guidelines, permit requirements, and resources for public space development onto one site, giving the user a handy step-by-step approach toward improving San Francisco’s streets,” the Planning Department said in a release.

Launched as a collaboration of the Planning Department, Department of Public Works, SF Public Utilities Commission, and the SFMTA, the site should help spread awareness of the street improvements available to residents and guide them through the city’s bureaucratic processes.


 
San Francisco Parklets Provide New Public Waysides
San Francisco’s new parklets program is adding dozens of street-side public spaces for you to enjoy. This innovative initiative replaces parked cars with seating and landscaping, to the benefit of weary walkers and local businesses. Read more.

via untappedcities:

San Francisco Parklets Provide New Public Waysides

San Francisco’s new parklets program is adding dozens of street-side public spaces for you to enjoy. This innovative initiative replaces parked cars with seating and landscaping, to the benefit of weary walkers and local businesses. Read more.

via untappedcities:

Zipcar Adds Plug-In Prius Hybrids to Its Fleet
Source: Fast Company
 
The next generation of electric cars is now available to the car-less—at least, to Zipcar members in Boston, San Francisco, and Portland.
The car-sharing service announced this week that eight Toyota Prius plug-in hybrids are now available to those three cities as part of a pilot program that will explore how the technology can work in large-scale car-sharing programs.
"Zipcar is an ideal test bed for early consumer acceptance of EVs," said Scott Griffith, Chairman and CEO of Zipcar, in a statement. “This project will allow companies to receive direct feedback from thousands of consumers in three cities and help evaluate how EVs fit into a large-scale car sharing model.”
Toyota’s plug-in Prius, set to be released to showrooms in 2012, can travel on pure electric power up to 62 MPH for approximately 13 miles before shifting into conventional Prius hybrid mode, where it averages 50 MPG. Zipcar is planning on charging its fleet using both conventional 110-volt outlets (a three-hour charge time) and 220-volt chargers (a 90-minute charge time). Customers will be allowed to take the plug-ins out for $7 per hour.

Zipcar Adds Plug-In Prius Hybrids to Its Fleet

Source: Fast Company

The next generation of electric cars is now available to the car-less—at least, to Zipcar members in Boston, San Francisco, and Portland.

The car-sharing service announced this week that eight Toyota Prius plug-in hybrids are now available to those three cities as part of a pilot program that will explore how the technology can work in large-scale car-sharing programs.

"Zipcar is an ideal test bed for early consumer acceptance of EVs," said Scott Griffith, Chairman and CEO of Zipcar, in a statement. “This project will allow companies to receive direct feedback from thousands of consumers in three cities and help evaluate how EVs fit into a large-scale car sharing model.”

Toyota’s plug-in Prius, set to be released to showrooms in 2012, can travel on pure electric power up to 62 MPH for approximately 13 miles before shifting into conventional Prius hybrid mode, where it averages 50 MPG. Zipcar is planning on charging its fleet using both conventional 110-volt outlets (a three-hour charge time) and 220-volt chargers (a 90-minute charge time). Customers will be allowed to take the plug-ins out for $7 per hour.

smartercities:

SF Bay Area taps Better Place for electric taxis | Green Tech - CNET News
Electric taxis with swappable battery packs are slated to come to the San Francisco Bay Area next year through a U.S. Department of Transportation-funded project. The $6.9 million, three-year project will result in 61 electric-drive taxi cabs and four stations where depleted batteries can be swapped in for fresh ones, according to Better Place, which was awarded the grant. Switching stations will be available in the corridor between San Francisco and San Jose, with the first ones installed by the end of 2011, according to Better Place. 

smartercities:

SF Bay Area taps Better Place for electric taxis | Green Tech - CNET News

Electric taxis with swappable battery packs are slated to come to the San Francisco Bay Area next year through a U.S. Department of Transportation-funded project. The $6.9 million, three-year project will result in 61 electric-drive taxi cabs and four stations where depleted batteries can be swapped in for fresh ones, according to Better Place, which was awarded the grant. Switching stations will be available in the corridor between San Francisco and San Jose, with the first ones installed by the end of 2011, according to Better Place. 

IBM snags rail customers in NY, San Francisco and DC for “smart” software to help with repairs
IBM’s effort to make the nation’s critical infrastructure “smarter” is getting a boost this week from three railroad operators that are buying IBM software to manage their repair scheduling. The deals being announced Wednesday are with the Long Island Rail Road in New York, the Bay Area Rapid Transit agency in San Francisco, and the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority in D.C.

IBM snags rail customers in NY, San Francisco and DC for “smart” software to help with repairs

IBM’s effort to make the nation’s critical infrastructure “smarter” is getting a boost this week from three railroad operators that are buying IBM software to manage their repair scheduling. The deals being announced Wednesday are with the Long Island Rail Road in New York, the Bay Area Rapid Transit agency in San Francisco, and the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority in D.C.