Wind could meet many times the world’s total power demand by 2030, Stanford reseachers say | KurzweilAI

Wind farm (credit: Jan Oelker/Repower))

Researchers at Stanford University’s School of Engineering and the University of Delaware have used what they call the “most sophisticated weather model available” to  meet many times the world’s total power demand by 2030 — in fact, enough to exceed the total demand by several times, even after accounting for reductions in wind speed caused by turbines.

In related news today, Lawrence Livermore and Carnegie Institute researchers have found that providing such power would not affect global climate.

In their study, Mark Z. Jacobson, a professor of civil and environmental engineering at Stanford, and Cristina Archer, an associate professor of geography and physical ocean science and engineering at the University of Delaware, adapted the three-dimensional, atmosphere-ocean-land computer model. known as GATOR-GCMOM. to calculate the theoretical maximum wind power potential on the planet, taking into account wind reduction by turbines.

Their model assumed wind turbines could be installed anywhere and everywhere, without regard to societal, environmental, climatic or economic considerations.

The new paper contradicts two earlier studies that said wind potential falls far short of the aggressive goal because each turbine steals too much wind energy from other turbines, and that turbines introduce harmful climate consequences that would negate some of the positive aspects of renewable wind energy.

Stanford Professors Launch Online University Coursera - Liz Gannes - News - AllThingsD
There seems to be something in the water at Stanford University that’s making faculty members leave their more-than-perfectly-good jobs and go teach online.
Stanford computer science professors Daphne Koller and Andrew Ng are on leave to launchCoursera, which will offer university classes for free online, in partnership with top schools.
Mountain View, Calif.-based Coursera is backed with $16 million in funding led by John Doerr at Kleiner Perkins and Scott Sandell at NEA. It has no immediate plans to charge for courses or to make money in other ways.
Compared to Udacity, a similar start-up from former Stanford professor Sebastian Thrunthat’s creating its own classes, Coursera helps support its university partners in creating their own courses, which are listed under each school’s brand.
Some might doubt that universities would want to share their prized content for free online with a start-up, but Coursera has already signed up Princeton, Stanford, the University of Michigan and the University of Pennsylvania as partners, with a set of classes launching April 23.

Stanford Professors Launch Online University Coursera - Liz Gannes - News - AllThingsD

There seems to be something in the water at Stanford University that’s making faculty members leave their more-than-perfectly-good jobs and go teach online.

Stanford computer science professors Daphne Koller and Andrew Ng are on leave to launchCoursera, which will offer university classes for free online, in partnership with top schools.

Mountain View, Calif.-based Coursera is backed with $16 million in funding led by John Doerr at Kleiner Perkins and Scott Sandell at NEA. It has no immediate plans to charge for courses or to make money in other ways.

Compared to Udacitya similar start-up from former Stanford professor Sebastian Thrunthat’s creating its own classes, Coursera helps support its university partners in creating their own courses, which are listed under each school’s brand.

Some might doubt that universities would want to share their prized content for free online with a start-up, but Coursera has already signed up Princeton, Stanford, the University of Michigan and the University of Pennsylvania as partners, with a set of classes launching April 23.

The Stanford Education Experiment Could Change Higher Learning Forever | Wired Science | Wired.com
 I’m enrolled in CS221: Introduction to Artificial Intelligence, a graduate- level course taught by Stanford professors Sebastian Thrun and Peter Norvig.
Last fall, the university in the heart of Silicon Valley did something it had never done before: It opened up three classes, including CS221, to anyone with a web connection. Lectures and assignments—the same ones administered in the regular on-campus class—would be posted and auto-graded online each week. Midterms and finals would have strict deadlines. Stanford wouldn’t issue course credit to the non-matriculated students. But at the end of the term, students who completed a course would be awarded an official Statement of Accomplishment.
People around the world have gone crazy for this opportunity. Fully two-thirds of my 160,000 classmates live outside the US. There are students in 190 countries—from India and South Korea to New Zealand and the Republic of Azerbaijan. More than 100 volunteers have signed up to translate the lectures into 44 languages, including Bengali. In Iran, where YouTube is blocked, one student cloned the CS221 class website and—with the professors’ permission—began reposting the video files for 1,000 students.

The Stanford Education Experiment Could Change Higher Learning Forever | Wired Science | Wired.com

 I’m enrolled in CS221: Introduction to Artificial Intelligence, a graduate- level course taught by Stanford professors Sebastian Thrun and Peter Norvig.

Last fall, the university in the heart of Silicon Valley did something it had never done before: It opened up three classes, including CS221, to anyone with a web connection. Lectures and assignments—the same ones administered in the regular on-campus class—would be posted and auto-graded online each week. Midterms and finals would have strict deadlines. Stanford wouldn’t issue course credit to the non-matriculated students. But at the end of the term, students who completed a course would be awarded an official Statement of Accomplishment.

People around the world have gone crazy for this opportunity. Fully two-thirds of my 160,000 classmates live outside the US. There are students in 190 countries—from India and South Korea to New Zealand and the Republic of Azerbaijan. More than 100 volunteers have signed up to translate the lectures into 44 languages, including Bengali. In Iran, where YouTube is blocked, one student cloned the CS221 class website and—with the professors’ permission—began reposting the video files for 1,000 students.

Computer Science 101 | Free Online Stanford Course
Nick Parlante has been teaching Computer Science at Stanford for over 20 years, and teaches programming best practices at Google. Nick has also produced the Google Python Class and codingbat.com code practice site, and the infamous Binky Pointer Fun video. (Nick’s Home)
About the Course
CS101 teaches the essential ideas of Computer Science for a zero-prior-experience audience. Computers can appear very complicated, but in reality, computers work within just a few, simple patterns. CS101 demystifies and brings those patterns to life, which is useful for anyone using computers today.
In CS101, students play and experiment with short bits of “computer code” to bring to life to the power and limitations of computers. Everything works within the browser, so there is no extra software to download or install. CS101 also provides a general background on computers today: what is a computer, what is hardware, what is software, what is the internet. No previous experience is required other than the ability to use a web browser.
Here is another video Nick created for this class.

Computer Science 101 | Free Online Stanford Course

Nick Parlante has been teaching Computer Science at Stanford for over 20 years, and teaches programming best practices at Google. Nick has also produced the Google Python Class and codingbat.com code practice site, and the infamous Binky Pointer Fun video. (Nick’s Home)

About the Course

CS101 teaches the essential ideas of Computer Science for a zero-prior-experience audience. Computers can appear very complicated, but in reality, computers work within just a few, simple patterns. CS101 demystifies and brings those patterns to life, which is useful for anyone using computers today.

In CS101, students play and experiment with short bits of “computer code” to bring to life to the power and limitations of computers. Everything works within the browser, so there is no extra software to download or install. CS101 also provides a general background on computers today: what is a computer, what is hardware, what is software, what is the internet. No previous experience is required other than the ability to use a web browser.

Here is another video Nick created for this class.

100,000  Sign Up For Stanford’s Open Class on Artificial Intelligence. Classes With 1 Million  Next? | Singularity Hub
A groundbreaking change has struck academia, and its reverberations may  be felt for years to come. One of Stanford’s first full courses to ever  be openly made available online has gone viral. In a matter of weeks it has signed up more than 100,000  students from around the world! Even as I wrote this article, another  5000 joined! As news of the course continues to spread, the ultimate  size of the class could reach greater epic proportions – we could easily  see interest skyrocket to 200,000 or even 300,000 or more.  Classes of 1  million or tens of millions may be in our future. If Stanford can  succeed in teaching classes of 100k+ students at a time, what will it  mean for education in general?

100,000 Sign Up For Stanford’s Open Class on Artificial Intelligence. Classes With 1 Million Next? | Singularity Hub

A groundbreaking change has struck academia, and its reverberations may be felt for years to come. One of Stanford’s first full courses to ever be openly made available online has gone viral. In a matter of weeks it has signed up more than 100,000 students from around the world! Even as I wrote this article, another 5000 joined! As news of the course continues to spread, the ultimate size of the class could reach greater epic proportions – we could easily see interest skyrocket to 200,000 or even 300,000 or more.  Classes of 1 million or tens of millions may be in our future. If Stanford can succeed in teaching classes of 100k+ students at a time, what will it mean for education in general?

IBM Research: Watch the Almaden Institute Live on August 26
Wednesday, August 26, 2009
Live Stream Agenda:
11:00 - 11:10 am ET: Opening Remarks, Josephine Cheng, IBM Fellow and Vice President Almaden Research Center
11:10 - 11:30 am ET: Why Energy Storage Matters, Winfried Wilcke, IBM, Conference Chairman
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET: Surviving Two Billion Cars: The Urgent Need to Transform Vehicles, Fuels, and Mobility around the Globe, Daniel Sperling, Author, Two Billion Cars
1:00 - 1:50 pm ET: Energy, Emissions, and Transportation: A Look into the Future, Burton Richter, Stanford, Nobel Laureate
1:50 - 2:40 pm ET: The Importance of Energy Storage in Automotive Applications, Ted Miller, Sr. Manager, Ford Research
Watch it here starting at 11 am ET on Wednesday, August 26:

IBM Research: Watch the Almaden Institute Live on August 26

Wednesday, August 26, 2009

Live Stream Agenda:

11:00 - 11:10 am ET: Opening Remarks, Josephine Cheng, IBM Fellow and Vice President Almaden Research Center

11:10 - 11:30 am ET: Why Energy Storage Matters, Winfried Wilcke, IBM, Conference Chairman

11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET: Surviving Two Billion Cars: The Urgent Need to Transform Vehicles, Fuels, and Mobility around the Globe, Daniel Sperling, Author, Two Billion Cars

1:00 - 1:50 pm ET: Energy, Emissions, and Transportation: A Look into the Future, Burton Richter, Stanford, Nobel Laureate

1:50 - 2:40 pm ET: The Importance of Energy Storage in Automotive Applications, Ted Miller, Sr. Manager, Ford Research

Watch it here starting at 11 am ET on Wednesday, August 26: