Walt Mossberg Look Ahead to 2013 - Talk Gets Cheaper, TV Gets Smarter
Internet-Controlled Everything
Another trend I expect to see in 2013 is an expansion of apps and devices that let people wirelessly control many everyday objects, from light bulbs to appliances, using low-powered networks and smartphones or tablets. And we’ll likely see more smart devices with such intelligence built in, similar to the Nest intelligent thermostat, which is Wi-Fi powered.

 Walt Mossberg Look Ahead to 2013 - Talk Gets Cheaper, TV Gets Smarter

Internet-Controlled Everything

Another trend I expect to see in 2013 is an expansion of apps and devices that let people wirelessly control many everyday objects, from light bulbs to appliances, using low-powered networks and smartphones or tablets. And we’ll likely see more smart devices with such intelligence built in, similar to the Nest intelligent thermostat, which is Wi-Fi powered.

How We Watch What We Watch: The Future Of TV : NPR
The rise of the smartphone, the tablet computer, Netflix and other on-demand services has changed the screen/viewer relationship forever. Also, we shouldn’t forget the importance of that increasingly antiquated invention called the “Internet.”
With each year (and in some cases, each month), the ability to watch things on different platforms at your own convenience moves from the producers’ scheduling to the consumers’ whims and desires.

How We Watch What We Watch: The Future Of TV : NPR

The rise of the smartphone, the tablet computer, Netflix and other on-demand services has changed the screen/viewer relationship forever. Also, we shouldn’t forget the importance of that increasingly antiquated invention called the “Internet.”

With each year (and in some cases, each month), the ability to watch things on different platforms at your own convenience moves from the producers’ scheduling to the consumers’ whims and desires.

Quantum-dot LED screens may soon rival OLEDs and LCDs | Physorg.com
Massachusetts company QD Vision, a spin-off from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, has joined with LG Display, headquartered at Seoul, and Solvay, a chemical company based in Belgium, to develop and manufacture active matrix QLED displays. The technology uses nano-scale semiconducting crystals that shine when exposed to electrical current (electroluminescence) or light (such as that produced by LEDs), producing a bright light and pure colors. QD Vision is working on electroluminescence, which is the best option for creating a display in which quantum dots are the main element. 

Quantum-dot LED screens may soon rival OLEDs and LCDs | Physorg.com

Massachusetts company QD Vision, a spin-off from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, has joined with LG Display, headquartered at Seoul, and Solvay, a chemical company based in Belgium, to develop and manufacture active matrix QLED displays. The technology uses nano-scale semiconducting crystals that shine when exposed to electrical current (electroluminescence) or light (such as that produced by LEDs), producing a bright light and pure colors. QD Vision is working on electroluminescence, which is the best option for creating a display in which quantum dots are the main element. 

Netflix. Meet Hulu. Now, How About Merging Together? | Fast Company
About two-thirds of Netflix’s 15 million customers now use the site’s instant streaming service to watch movies and TV shows on a wide variety of media players, home theaters, Internet-enabled TVs, and game consoles. During the past few months, Netflix has added thousands of new movies and TV episodes to its catalog of streaming titles; in fact, the company estimates that its mail business will peak in 2013, and soon it will spend more on licensing deals than it does on postage.

Netflix. Meet Hulu. Now, How About Merging Together? | Fast Company

About two-thirds of Netflix’s 15 million customers now use the site’s instant streaming service to watch movies and TV shows on a wide variety of media players, home theaters, Internet-enabled TVs, and game consoles. During the past few months, Netflix has added thousands of new movies and TV episodes to its catalog of streaming titles; in fact, the company estimates that its mail business will peak in 2013, and soon it will spend more on licensing deals than it does on postage.

NetFlix Everywhere: Sorry Cable, You’re History | Wired
Today, nearly 3 million users access Netflix’s instant streaming service, watching an estimated 5 million movies and TV shows every week on their PCs or living room sets. They get it through Roku’s player, which was successfully launched in May 2008. (The Roku now also offers more than 45,000 movies and TV shows on demand through Amazon.com and, since August, live and archived Major League Baseball games.) They get it through their Xbox 360s—Microsoft added Netflix to its Xbox Live service last fall. They get it through LG and Samsung Blu-ray players. They get it through their TiVos and new flatscreen TVs. By the end of 2009, nearly 10 million Netflix-equipped gadgets will be hanging on walls and sitting in entertainment centers. And Hastings says this is just the beginning: “It’s possible that within a few years, nearly all Internet-connected consumer electronics devices will include Netflix.”

NetFlix Everywhere: Sorry Cable, You’re History | Wired

Today, nearly 3 million users access Netflix’s instant streaming service, watching an estimated 5 million movies and TV shows every week on their PCs or living room sets. They get it through Roku’s player, which was successfully launched in May 2008. (The Roku now also offers more than 45,000 movies and TV shows on demand through Amazon.com and, since August, live and archived Major League Baseball games.) They get it through their Xbox 360s—Microsoft added Netflix to its Xbox Live service last fall. They get it through LG and Samsung Blu-ray players. They get it through their TiVos and new flatscreen TVs. By the end of 2009, nearly 10 million Netflix-equipped gadgets will be hanging on walls and sitting in entertainment centers. And Hastings says this is just the beginning: “It’s possible that within a few years, nearly all Internet-connected consumer electronics devices will include Netflix.”

3-D television expected to come to homes in 2010 - CNN.com
Three-dimensional images are expected jump out of movie theaters and into living rooms by next year. Panasonic demonstrates 3-D television at a recent technology expo in Atlanta, Georgia. Panasonic demonstrates 3-D television at a recent technology expo in Atlanta, Georgia. Sony and Panasonic say they will release home 3-D television systems in 2010; Mitsubishi and JVC are reported to be working on similar products.

3-D television expected to come to homes in 2010 - CNN.com

Three-dimensional images are expected jump out of movie theaters and into living rooms by next year. Panasonic demonstrates 3-D television at a recent technology expo in Atlanta, Georgia. Panasonic demonstrates 3-D television at a recent technology expo in Atlanta, Georgia. Sony and Panasonic say they will release home 3-D television systems in 2010; Mitsubishi and JVC are reported to be working on similar products.

The event began with a chance to learn about the three major approaches to full-colour 3D display today, and a chance to try out a couple of them. They are:
 Active LCD shutter glasses darken one eye, then the other, in sync with the alternating image being shown on a standard display. This halves the effective frame rate by sharing the display across both eyes, and being an active system requires power to operate the shutters and also to be in sync with the display. Expensive glasses, but off-the-shelf (though high-end) screens or projectors. [more on wikipedia]
Passive polarised glasses work much like the old red and green glasses, but using polarised filters rather than red/green means you get a full colour experience. It means cheap, passive glasses but complicated and expensive screens and projectors. If you’ve seen a colour 3D movie, this was probably the way it was delivered. [more on wikipedia]
Autostereoscopic display is a stupid name for a screen which displays 3D without needing glasses by use of a lenticular or ‘parallax barrier’ layer in front of a specialised (usually LCD) display, presenting a different image based on viewing position. No glasses, but a very limited viewing angle. [more on wikipedia] (via 3D TV - Roo Reynolds)

The event began with a chance to learn about the three major approaches to full-colour 3D display today, and a chance to try out a couple of them. They are:

  1. Active LCD shutter glasses darken one eye, then the other, in sync with the alternating image being shown on a standard display. This halves the effective frame rate by sharing the display across both eyes, and being an active system requires power to operate the shutters and also to be in sync with the display. Expensive glasses, but off-the-shelf (though high-end) screens or projectors. [more on wikipedia]
  2. Passive polarised glasses work much like the old red and green glasses, but using polarised filters rather than red/green means you get a full colour experience. It means cheap, passive glasses but complicated and expensive screens and projectors. If you’ve seen a colour 3D movie, this was probably the way it was delivered. [more on wikipedia]
  3. Autostereoscopic display is a stupid name for a screen which displays 3D without needing glasses by use of a lenticular or ‘parallax barrier’ layer in front of a specialised (usually LCD) display, presenting a different image based on viewing position. No glasses, but a very limited viewing angle. [more on wikipedia] (via 3D TV - Roo Reynolds)

Alioscopy Unveils 3D Video Without the Red-and-Blue Glasses

(Posted by Blackberry 8830) It’s pretty hard to get people — busy New Yorkers, in particular — to stop in their tracks on the sidewalk to look at an advertising display. Let’s face it, much of New York City is an advertising opportunity.Yet a single 42-inch LED display screen in the window of an unoccupied retail store on Seventh Avenue and 50th Street in Manhattan is causing groups of people to stop, look and wonder. The display shows looped videos of a rotating Snickers bar and a moving Intel logo. What’s different about this is that it is a 3-dimensional display which doesn’t require viewers to wear those annoying red-and-blue glasses to see the 3D effect.

IBM Video - Business Analytics & Optimization (via IBMAdvertising)

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