Report: Making urban farming possible (and profitable)

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This guide, a master’s paper from the Department of Horticulture at Cornell University, addresses the changing face of the agricultural industry, and supports farmers producing food in urban centers and on the urban fringe. It is a collection of topical factsheets including resources and…

The smell of freshly cut grass may stir memories of baseball parks, cookouts or lazy summer afternoons in the suburbs, but what we perceive as a sweet aroma is actually the plant equivalent of a distress call, one that the grass releases to signal that the lawn is under attack.

4 Tips For Starting A Farm In Your City [Video] | Fast Company
Consider this paradox: 49 million Americans live with daily food insecurity, 23 million live in urban food deserts, and collectively we’re all getting fatter. Simultaneously vacant lots, concrete grooves, and other desolate, empty spots dot urban landscapes, while a quarter of traditional agricultural land is severely degraded according to the UN.
Enter the urban farm: a fast, smart, cheap way to bring healthy food closer to those who need it, transform ugly vacant spaces into lush gardens, and promote a healthier, greener, more connected urban community.
A recently released video by the American Society of Landscape Architects uses case studies from edible-city innovators, such as Cleveland and Detroit, to offer practical advice for bringing urban farms to your backyard (or corner lot or rooftop). Here are four helpful tips:

4 Tips For Starting A Farm In Your City [Video] | Fast Company

Consider this paradox: 49 million Americans live with daily food insecurity, 23 million live in urban food deserts, and collectively we’re all getting fatter. Simultaneously vacant lots, concrete grooves, and other desolate, empty spots dot urban landscapes, while a quarter of traditional agricultural land is severely degraded according to the UN.

Enter the urban farm: a fast, smart, cheap way to bring healthy food closer to those who need it, transform ugly vacant spaces into lush gardens, and promote a healthier, greener, more connected urban community.

A recently released video by the American Society of Landscape Architects uses case studies from edible-city innovators, such as Cleveland and Detroit, to offer practical advice for bringing urban farms to your backyard (or corner lot or rooftop). Here are four helpful tips:

GROWING CITIES is a feature-length documentary that examines the role of urban farming in America and asks how much power it has to revitalize our cities and change the way we eat.The film follows two friends on their journey across the country as they meet the men and women who are challenging the way this country grows and distributes its food, one vacant city lot, rooftop garden, and backyard chicken coop at a time. 

Along the way they learn that this grassroots movement takes many forms – from those growing food in their backyards to activists seeking a meaningful alternative to the industrial food system, and more.  At its core, the film asks people to re-imagine what’s possible in urban settings and consider creatingGROWING CITIES of their own—places that are healthier, more sustainable, and socially just

WHAT WE’RE DOING:

We need to raise at least $35,000 by May 12th to prepare for an early 2013 release.

Carbon nanotubes can double growth of cell cultures important in industry | KurzweilAI
A dose of carbon nanotubes more than doubles the growth rate of plant cell cultures — workhorses in the production of everything from lifesaving medications to sweeteners to dyes and perfumes — researchers at the University of Arkansas report.
Their study is the first to show that carbon nanotubes boost plant cell division and growth.
Their previous research demonstrated that multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) can penetrate through the thick coatings on seeds, stimulate germination of the seeds and stimulate the growth of certain plants.

Carbon nanotubes can double growth of cell cultures important in industry | KurzweilAI

A dose of carbon nanotubes more than doubles the growth rate of plant cell cultures — workhorses in the production of everything from lifesaving medications to sweeteners to dyes and perfumes — researchers at the University of Arkansas report.

Their study is the first to show that carbon nanotubes boost plant cell division and growth.

Their previous research demonstrated that multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) can penetrate through the thick coatings on seeds, stimulate germination of the seeds and stimulate the growth of certain plants.

A ‘Vertical Greenhouse’ Could Make a Swedish City Self-Sufficient
The future of urban farming is under construction in Sweden as agricultural design firm Plantagon works to bring a 12-year-old vision to life: The city of Linköping will soon be home to a 17-story “vertical greenhouse.”
Check out the story on GOOD.is→ 
via good:

A ‘Vertical Greenhouse’ Could Make a Swedish City Self-Sufficient

The future of urban farming is under construction in Sweden as agricultural design firm Plantagon works to bring a 12-year-old vision to life: The city of Linköping will soon be home to a 17-story “vertical greenhouse.”

Check out the story on GOOD.is 

via good:

Big Box Farms
Big Box Farms is a disruptive, revolutionary hybrid  that combines the benefits of small-scale farming and large-scale  agribusiness.
Our method allows us to grow and distribute produce close to where it’s consumed, creating local agriculture at scale.
The Company’s Farm Rack technology is the most productive and  resource and labor efficient growing system in the world, which  constitutes a breakthrough in sustainable food production.
Big Box Farms builds farms inside industrial warehouses using its  patent-pending Farm Rack technology, allowing food to be produced  anywhere year round.  The Farm Rack was built, designed, and refined in  collaboration with College of the Atlantic’s Sustainable Business  Incubator, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National  Science Foundation.

Big Box Farms

Big Box Farms is a disruptive, revolutionary hybrid that combines the benefits of small-scale farming and large-scale agribusiness.

Our method allows us to grow and distribute produce close to where it’s consumed, creating local agriculture at scale.

The Company’s Farm Rack technology is the most productive and resource and labor efficient growing system in the world, which constitutes a breakthrough in sustainable food production.

Big Box Farms builds farms inside industrial warehouses using its patent-pending Farm Rack technology, allowing food to be produced anywhere year round. The Farm Rack was built, designed, and refined in collaboration with College of the Atlantic’s Sustainable Business Incubator, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Science Foundation.

Water availability is gradually declining. Even 30 years ago we had probably twice as much water as we have now.

Quote by Glenn Schur, Farmer from Plainview Texas.  Quote found online in article "Digital cloud lets farmer know when to water" published by BBC NewsGlenn Schur
FarmVille Inspires Real Life Farming Experiment
There’s already a FarmVille for Dummies, but now there’s FarmVille for Real.
My Farm Experiment (not affiliated with the Zynga game) in the UK lets players run an actual farm on the Wimpole Estate,  which is owned by the National Trust, a British charity. Some 10,000  people will help farm manager Richard Morris run things. Here’s the  catch, though: It’s not free. It costs £30 (about $49) to become a  virtual farmer. That payment goes to the National Trust.
Project manager John Alexander told The Guardian that FarmVille was an inspiration for the effort. Coincidentally, Zynga introduced an English Countyside extension of the game in March.
Source: Mashable

FarmVille Inspires Real Life Farming Experiment

There’s already a FarmVille for Dummies, but now there’s FarmVille for Real.

My Farm Experiment (not affiliated with the Zynga game) in the UK lets players run an actual farm on the Wimpole Estate, which is owned by the National Trust, a British charity. Some 10,000 people will help farm manager Richard Morris run things. Here’s the catch, though: It’s not free. It costs £30 (about $49) to become a virtual farmer. That payment goes to the National Trust.

Project manager John Alexander told The Guardian that FarmVille was an inspiration for the effort. Coincidentally, Zynga introduced an English Countyside extension of the game in March.

Source: Mashable