A Big Texan Breakthrough for the Internet of Things | Motley Fool

Remember the last time your dishwasher texted you when it broke? Unless you’re Bill Gates, you probably have the kind that just sits there and leaks while you’re on vacation. Such smart devices do exist, but connected appliances are most likely to be sold as part of a complete package, with touchscreen controls and sophisticated solutions most people don’t really need.

But simple solutions to large problems — like a suddenly dangerous appliance alerting you to its problem — are always valued. That’s why Texas Instruments designed the SimpleLink wireless processor, which should be able to get just about anything with a silicon controller online with ease. If this is what manufacturers and consumers need for broader adoption, it could position TI as the go-to company for getting hooked into the Internet of things.

Broadcom pushes WiFi to connect Internet of things | GigaOm
Chip giant Broadcom has launched a new WiFi chip module for  manufacturers to use to add connectivity to devices, appliances, energy  management gadgets and other things that less commonly have Internet  connections. The WiFi module, which the company is calling Wireless  Internet Connectivity for Embedded Devices (WICED), contains a  processor, a WiFi radio, a connectivity API, and a software stack.
Broadcom’s move is an effort to use WiFi to tap into the “Internet of  Things,” movement, where every device will one day be able to talk to  each other, beyond just computers and cell phones — think everything  from your car, to sensors throughout your home and office, to your  electricity meter, and even down to tiny objects like the cap of your prescription pills, which could text you and tell you “hey, it’s time to take me now.”

Broadcom pushes WiFi to connect Internet of things | GigaOm

Chip giant Broadcom has launched a new WiFi chip module for manufacturers to use to add connectivity to devices, appliances, energy management gadgets and other things that less commonly have Internet connections. The WiFi module, which the company is calling Wireless Internet Connectivity for Embedded Devices (WICED), contains a processor, a WiFi radio, a connectivity API, and a software stack.

Broadcom’s move is an effort to use WiFi to tap into the “Internet of Things,” movement, where every device will one day be able to talk to each other, beyond just computers and cell phones — think everything from your car, to sensors throughout your home and office, to your electricity meter, and even down to tiny objects like the cap of your prescription pills, which could text you and tell you “hey, it’s time to take me now.”

CES: Green Plug plugs digital, efficient power supply | CNET

It’s time to digitize power supplies to make them smart enough to work with multiple devices and draw just the power electronics need, according to Green Plug.

Green Plug on Wednesday at the Consumer Electronics Show introduced its Green Power Process, which it said will be available in the second quarter this year.

A concept design of a universal power supply which would optimize power delivery to multiple electronic gadgets.

A concept design of a universal power supply which would optimize power delivery to multiple electronic gadgets.

(Credit: Green Plug)

The Green Power Processor is a chip designed for digital power supplies, which are meant to be more versatile and efficient than existing analog power adapters.

When built into a power supply, the processor can detect how much voltage and power a gadget, such as a PC or TV, needs from the grid. That allows electronics to use less energy overall than analog power suppliers and eliminate stand-by or vampire power.

Green Plug is marketing this processor to power supply manufacturers as a way to improve energy efficiency. Power adapters, or supplies, convert alternating current from the grid to the direct current that electronics use.



Read more: http://news.cnet.com/8301-11128_3-20027316-54.html#ixzz1AB1mDux0

People Power rides ‘Internet of things’ to smart grid | Green Tech - CNET News
The best path to energy-efficient electronics is connecting them to the Internet, according to People Power. The Silicon Valley-based company today launched a system that uses embedded networking chips and Internet software, called the Energy Services Platform, to monitor and control plugged-in devices for better efficiency. It says it’s working with some business partners and expects its products to be available in the first quarter of next year. 

People Power rides ‘Internet of things’ to smart grid | Green Tech - CNET News

The best path to energy-efficient electronics is connecting them to the Internet, according to People Power. The Silicon Valley-based company today launched a system that uses embedded networking chips and Internet software, called the Energy Services Platform, to monitor and control plugged-in devices for better efficiency. It says it’s working with some business partners and expects its products to be available in the first quarter of next year.