smartercities:

Future Cities Of Floating Villas And Parks, Made From Ocean Plastic | FastCompany
The Maas river runs through France, Belgium, the Netherlands, and empties into the North Sea. It also carries huge amounts of Europe’s trash from its cities into the ocean. Inspired by what’s floating by, Dutch architect Ramon Knoester and his firm WHIM have spent the last four years dreaming up ways to turn one of our greatest environmental ills into built utopias on water. Knoester’s latest vision: Floating parks and villas.

smartercities:

Future Cities Of Floating Villas And Parks, Made From Ocean Plastic | FastCompany

The Maas river runs through France, Belgium, the Netherlands, and empties into the North Sea. It also carries huge amounts of Europe’s trash from its cities into the ocean. Inspired by what’s floating by, Dutch architect Ramon Knoester and his firm WHIM have spent the last four years dreaming up ways to turn one of our greatest environmental ills into built utopias on water. Knoester’s latest vision: Floating parks and villas.

Dutch architect to build house with 3D printer
A Dutch architect has designed a house “with no beginning or end” to be built using the world’s largest 3D printer, harnessing technology that may one day be used to print houses on the moon.Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-01-dutch-architect-house-3d-printer.html#jCp

Dutch architect to build house with 3D printer

A Dutch architect has designed a house “with no beginning or end” to be built using the world’s largest 3D printer, harnessing technology that may one day be used to print houses on the moon.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-01-dutch-architect-house-3d-printer.html#jCp

 5 Companies on the Cutting Edge of Sustainable Prefab Housing
Rather than overload our landfills, however, contemporary architectural firms and design companies are rethinking what prefab means for today’s waste-conscious and energy-savvy homebuyers. Many are combining traditional modular concepts with a customized approach, allowing clients to select a basic design and alter it according to their tastes.

 5 Companies on the Cutting Edge of Sustainable Prefab Housing

Rather than overload our landfills, however, contemporary architectural firms and design companies are rethinking what prefab means for today’s waste-conscious and energy-savvy homebuyers. Many are combining traditional modular concepts with a customized approach, allowing clients to select a basic design and alter it according to their tastes.

City as Laboratory for Alternative Urban Research and Practice | This Big City
By William Hunter - an architect, urban designer and Teaching Fellow at University College London’s Bartlett Development Planning Unit where he leads studio modules in urban practice in the developing world, critical case study analysis, and investigative design strategies. 
The current landscape of cities is that of contested processes, interdependencies and relations which are dominated to various degrees by diverse actors with contrasting voices and agendas. These complex relations emerge from historical and material dialectics of the territory, linking diverse activities with the environment in a time-based evolving process, connecting action sequences that may happen simultaneously both locally and globally. To appropriately engage in this arena, a critical re-appraisal is required concerning a new paradigmatic shift in the cultural discipline and practice of Architecture and Urban Design, one that views design as an interpretive and open form of action.
Arguably a re-appraisal of this nature needs to start in education. The notion of sleepless nights spent toiling over the design of a hypothetical museum or even the genuine article of a micro design-build project does little to enliven an understanding of the underlying and surface complexities that run constant in the shaping of the urban realm. As well as in practice, there is necessary movement to re-engage with the ground, the real, as it unfolds in front of us. Pre-dated by learned theory and methodology, the act of research, especially field-based investigation, becomes paramount to the exposure of a reality that offers higher stakes, higher return value and unparalleled informed experience. As Jeremy Till suggests, there are other ways of doing architecture.
In a move to align with any emerging shift in an alternative or renewed critical design practice, the Bartlett’s Development Planning Unit has launched its 2nd annualsummerLab series. Drawing on extensive internal resources and established departmental ethos, these workshops are an intended extension of academic and professional pursuits seeking to leverage the reality of the city as a laboratory for developing socially responsive design measures that provoke, stimulate, strategize, and reconsider the role of designers and practitioners in promoting spatial justice.

City as Laboratory for Alternative Urban Research and Practice | This Big City

By William Hunter - an architect, urban designer and Teaching Fellow at University College London’s Bartlett Development Planning Unit where he leads studio modules in urban practice in the developing world, critical case study analysis, and investigative design strategies. 

The current landscape of cities is that of contested processes, interdependencies and relations which are dominated to various degrees by diverse actors with contrasting voices and agendas. These complex relations emerge from historical and material dialectics of the territory, linking diverse activities with the environment in a time-based evolving process, connecting action sequences that may happen simultaneously both locally and globally. To appropriately engage in this arena, a critical re-appraisal is required concerning a new paradigmatic shift in the cultural discipline and practice of Architecture and Urban Design, one that views design as an interpretive and open form of action.

Arguably a re-appraisal of this nature needs to start in education. The notion of sleepless nights spent toiling over the design of a hypothetical museum or even the genuine article of a micro design-build project does little to enliven an understanding of the underlying and surface complexities that run constant in the shaping of the urban realm. As well as in practice, there is necessary movement to re-engage with the ground, the real, as it unfolds in front of us. Pre-dated by learned theory and methodology, the act of research, especially field-based investigation, becomes paramount to the exposure of a reality that offers higher stakes, higher return value and unparalleled informed experience. As Jeremy Till suggests, there are other ways of doing architecture.

In a move to align with any emerging shift in an alternative or renewed critical design practice, the Bartlett’s Development Planning Unit has launched its 2nd annualsummerLab series. Drawing on extensive internal resources and established departmental ethos, these workshops are an intended extension of academic and professional pursuits seeking to leverage the reality of the city as a laboratory for developing socially responsive design measures that provoke, stimulate, strategize, and reconsider the role of designers and practitioners in promoting spatial justice.

100-Mile Houses Expand the Locavore Movement From Food to Architecture - Design - GOOD
Briony Penn’s 100-mile house in Salt Spring Island, British Columbia
The rise of the locavore movement introduced millions of people to the 100-mile diet,  which involves eating only food produced within one’s own region. Now, a  new focus on sustainable architecture is applying the same concept to  homes.
The idea of a 100-mile house shouldn’t be shocking:  Historically, most homes were made using local materials simply because  it was more practical. But in an age when even middle-class homeowners  can order marble countertops from Italy and bamboo floors from China,  creating a home entirely from local materials challenges builders to  carefully consider every piece of the structure, from the foundation to  the eaves.
Last week, the Architecture Foundation of British Columbia launched an international competition to design a 1,200-square-foot, four-person home that exclusively uses  materials made or recycled within 100 miles of Vancouver. David M.  Hewitt, the current chair of the Architecture Foundation, came up with  the idea for the competition on a whim and presented it at a board  meeting. “It was almost thrown out facetiously, and everybody latched  onto it,” he says

100-Mile Houses Expand the Locavore Movement From Food to Architecture - Design - GOOD

Briony Penn’s 100-mile house in Salt Spring Island, British Columbia

The rise of the locavore movement introduced millions of people to the 100-mile diet, which involves eating only food produced within one’s own region. Now, a new focus on sustainable architecture is applying the same concept to homes.

The idea of a 100-mile house shouldn’t be shocking: Historically, most homes were made using local materials simply because it was more practical. But in an age when even middle-class homeowners can order marble countertops from Italy and bamboo floors from China, creating a home entirely from local materials challenges builders to carefully consider every piece of the structure, from the foundation to the eaves.

Last week, the Architecture Foundation of British Columbia launched an international competition to design a 1,200-square-foot, four-person home that exclusively uses materials made or recycled within 100 miles of Vancouver. David M. Hewitt, the current chair of the Architecture Foundation, came up with the idea for the competition on a whim and presented it at a board meeting. “It was almost thrown out facetiously, and everybody latched onto it,” he says

IBM and Tulane University Usher in a New Era for Smarter Buildings in New Orleans (by jgluckibm)

Tulane University’s School of Architecture, a program distinguished by its focus on community engagement and environmental sustainability, has turned to the IBM Intelligent Buildings Management and Johnson Controls to make its buildings smarter.

The first project is helping to transform the home of Tulane’s School of Architecture, the century-old Richardson Memorial Hall into a “smarter building living laboratory,” using IBM Intelligent Building Management while maintaining respect its for its historic status. The school aims to arm a new generation of architects with techniques that will allow historic buildings to be more efficiently adapted for modern use.

An open source kit for designing and building a home
We’ve seen open source principles applied to cars, restaurants and phone service, to name just a few examples, but it wasn’t until very recently that we came across an open source solution for designing and building a home. Sure enough, though, WikiHouse is a brand-new effort to let anyone design and build their own dwelling. READ MORE…
via springwise:

An open source kit for designing and building a home

We’ve seen open source principles applied to carsrestaurants and phone service, to name just a few examples, but it wasn’t until very recently that we came across an open source solution for designing and building a home. Sure enough, though, WikiHouse is a brand-new effort to let anyone design and build their own dwelling. READ MORE…

via springwise:

Harvesting energy: body heat to warm buildings Body heat is not an energy source that normally springs to mind when companies want to keep down soaring energy costs. But it did spring to the mind of one Swedish company, which  decided the warmth that everybody generates naturally was in fact a  resource that was going to waste.
Not only is the system environmentally friendly but it also lowers the energy costs of the office block by as much as 25%.

Harvesting energy: body heat to warm buildings Body heat is not an energy source that normally springs to mind when companies want to keep down soaring energy costs. But it did spring to the mind of one Swedish company, which decided the warmth that everybody generates naturally was in fact a resource that was going to waste.

Not only is the system environmentally friendly but it also lowers the energy costs of the office block by as much as 25%.

Taiwan To Build Tree-Like Skyscraper With Moving Exterior Observation Pods | Popular Science
Besides being designed to resemble a tree, Taiwan’s newest skyscraper will have some incredible eco-friendly features. Much of it’s power will be produced from turbines and photovoltaic panels. Also, it will use geothermal power for heating and collect rainwater and purify it for use.

Taiwan To Build Tree-Like Skyscraper With Moving Exterior Observation Pods | Popular Science

Besides being designed to resemble a tree, Taiwan’s newest skyscraper will have some incredible eco-friendly features. Much of it’s power will be produced from turbines and photovoltaic panels. Also, it will use geothermal power for heating and collect rainwater and purify it for use.

Moving Dallas Forward | URBAN RE:VISION
The Central Dallas Community Development Corporation announced the winner of Re:Vision’s international design competition: “Forwarding Dallas”. A collaboration between Portuguese-based architectural firms Atelier Data and Moov.  

Moving Dallas Forward | URBAN RE:VISION

The Central Dallas Community Development Corporation announced the winner of Re:Vision’s international design competition: “Forwarding Dallas”. A collaboration between Portuguese-based architectural firms Atelier Data and Moov.  

Can student performance improve with the environment? Studies have shown that the educational environment can enable students to perform up to two grades better. Mark Miller, founder of Project FROG is constructing buildings that feature healthier educational environments; ones that better utilize natural daylight, manage glare and acoustics, and circulate fresh air.