First step toward creating a 3D artificial brain | KurzweilAI
Nerve cells growing on a three-dimensional nanocellulose scaffold. Functioning synapses are yellow; the red spots show where synapses have been destroyed (credit: Philip Krantz, Chalmers)
Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg have taken the first step in creating a three-dimensional model of the brain by attaching neurons to a positively charged nanocellulose scaffold.
The purpose is to understand Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease better, for example.
Nitrocellulose (microfibrillated cellulose) is obtained from plant materials, such as woodpulp.
‟Pores can be created in nanocellulose, which allows nerve cells to grow in a three-dimensional matrix. This makes it extra comfortable for the cells and creates a realistic cultivation environment that is more like a real brain compared with a three-dimensional cell cultivation well,” says Paul Gatenholm, Professor of Biopolymer Technology at Chalmers.

First step toward creating a 3D artificial brain | KurzweilAI

Nerve cells growing on a three-dimensional nanocellulose scaffold. Functioning synapses are yellow; the red spots show where synapses have been destroyed (credit: Philip Krantz, Chalmers)

Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg have taken the first step in creating a three-dimensional model of the brain by attaching neurons to a positively charged nanocellulose scaffold.

The purpose is to understand Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease better, for example.

Nitrocellulose (microfibrillated cellulose) is obtained from plant materials, such as woodpulp.

‟Pores can be created in nanocellulose, which allows nerve cells to grow in a three-dimensional matrix. This makes it extra comfortable for the cells and creates a realistic cultivation environment that is more like a real brain compared with a three-dimensional cell cultivation well,” says Paul Gatenholm, Professor of Biopolymer Technology at Chalmers.