The Era of Cognitive Computing: Calling For a Shared Research Agenda

Zachary Lemnios, VP for Strategy, IBM Research

Zachary Lemnios, Vice President, Strategy, IBM Research

By Zachary Lemnios

Over the course of the 70+-year history of computing, government, academia and industry have joined forces repeatedly to bring cutting-edge science to bear on the some of the major challenges of the day—and, in each case, computer science has played an important role. Among those remarkable efforts were the Manhattan Project, the Space Race, and the Human Genome Project.

Today, we’re at a turning point in the evolution of information technology. A new age is dawning: the era of cognitive computing. At IBM, we believe it will be as distinct from today’s era of programmable computing as this period was from the earlier tabulating era. IBM’s Watson, which defeated two former grand-champions on the TV quiz show Jeopardy, was a first step forward on a long journey. Over the coming years and decades, computers will learn, reason and partner with human beings to help them harvest the benefits of Big Data and better understand how the world works so people can make superior decisions and live more successful lives.

Yet, there’s no assurance that breakthroughs in cognitive computing will progress as quickly as their advocates would like. That’s why IBM is reaching out to partners in academia, industry and across our clients in an effort to set a shared agenda aimed at hastening and guiding progress.

Return to A Smarter Planet on Oct. 2 starting at 8:30 a.m. for live blogging from IBM Research’s Cognitive Computing Colloquium, featuring speeches by Nobel Prize winner Daniel Kahneman, MIT professor Thomas Malone, A.I. visionary Danny Hillis and more.

Vending machine offers free samples, provides rich user data to retailers
Free samples are a common way for retailers to promote new products, but supermarkets often use staff to hand them out and don’t collect data about the success those campaigns. New startup Freeosk has now created a vending machine that automatically dispenses samples to loyalty card holders. READ MORE…

Vending machine offers free samples, provides rich user data to retailers

Free samples are a common way for retailers to promote new products, but supermarkets often use staff to hand them out and don’t collect data about the success those campaigns. New startup Freeosk has now created a vending machine that automatically dispenses samples to loyalty card holders. READ MORE…

IBM’s massive bet on Watson
Dr. Mark Kris is among the top lung cancer specialists in the world. As chief of thoracic oncology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering (MSK) Cancer Center in New York City, he has been diagnosing and treating patients for more than 30 years. But even he is overwhelmed by the massive amount of information that goes into figuring out which drugs to give his patients — and the relatively crude tools he has to decipher that data. “This is the standard for treatment today,” he says, passing me a well-worn printout of the 2013 treatment guidelines in his office. We choose a cancer type. A paragraph of instructions says to pair two drugs from a list of 16. “Do the math,” he says. It means more than 100 possible combinations. “How do you figure out which ones are the best?” 

IBM’s massive bet on Watson

Dr. Mark Kris is among the top lung cancer specialists in the world. As chief of thoracic oncology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering (MSK) Cancer Center in New York City, he has been diagnosing and treating patients for more than 30 years. But even he is overwhelmed by the massive amount of information that goes into figuring out which drugs to give his patients — and the relatively crude tools he has to decipher that data. “This is the standard for treatment today,” he says, passing me a well-worn printout of the 2013 treatment guidelines in his office. We choose a cancer type. A paragraph of instructions says to pair two drugs from a list of 16. “Do the math,” he says. It means more than 100 possible combinations. “How do you figure out which ones are the best?” 

smartercities:

Open Data’s Road to Better Transit | Government Technology
Data is everywhere. It now costs less to capture, store and process data than ever before, thanks to better technology and economies of scale. And more than ever, the public expects government to use data to improve its services. Increasingly, government’s problem is not capturing the data, but having sufficient resources to clean and analyze the information in order to address issues, improve performance and make informed decisions.

smartercities:

Open Data’s Road to Better Transit | Government Technology

Data is everywhere. It now costs less to capture, store and process data than ever before, thanks to better technology and economies of scale. And more than ever, the public expects government to use data to improve its services. Increasingly, government’s problem is not capturing the data, but having sufficient resources to clean and analyze the information in order to address issues, improve performance and make informed decisions.

I don’t think there’s a uniform policy or standardization for what should be done with user-level data. We’ve been looking to companies like Google or Facebook to do the right thing and to set the standard but to the extent these are enforced or that other companies have to follow, a lot of this stuff isn’t in place.

Rachel Schutt, Columbia Institute for Data Sciences and Engineering

How the new field of data science is grappling with ethics | SmartPlanet

(via ibmsocialbiz)

(via ibmsocialbiz)

IBM Heat Map for analyzing customer activity. Marketers can gauge the behavior of customers across all digital channels, identify patterns and then adjust the digital experience based on this insight to improve the quality and appeal of the user’s experience. IBM digital experience software combines with IBM customer experience management capabilities so marketing professionals can analyze customer activity on a specific channel, such as a mobile device.

IBM Heat Map for analyzing customer activity. Marketers can gauge the behavior of customers across all digital channels, identify patterns and then adjust the digital experience based on this insight to improve the quality and appeal of the user’s experience. IBM digital experience software combines with IBM customer experience management capabilities so marketing professionals can analyze customer activity on a specific channel, such as a mobile device.

The Surge of Data in Healthcare- GOOD Partnerships and Matt Chase contributed in Figures Of Progress, Technology and Healthcare
We know that data is all around us. Each time you make a web search, turn on your car or even scan your rewards card at the grocery store, data is being collected. But there’s one industry where there is a lot of data being gathered, and most of it isn’t being used.
In the healthcare sector, 80 percent of patient data is unstructured—meaning it’s not being organized in a predefined manner. The Center for Disease Control estimates 42 percent of all physicians have an electronic health record system that meets federal standards, but in the healthcare field especially there are many hand written notes and charts, which can’t be easily processed by traditional computer programs.
Continue reading on good.is

The Surge of Data in Healthcare
GOOD Partnerships and Matt Chase contributed in Figures Of Progress, Technology and Healthcare

We know that data is all around us. Each time you make a web search, turn on your car or even scan your rewards card at the grocery store, data is being collected. But there’s one industry where there is a lot of data being gathered, and most of it isn’t being used.

In the healthcare sector, 80 percent of patient data is unstructured—meaning it’s not being organized in a predefined manner. The Center for Disease Control estimates 42 percent of all physicians have an electronic health record system that meets federal standards, but in the healthcare field especially there are many hand written notes and charts, which can’t be easily processed by traditional computer programs.

Continue reading on good.is

Tiny New Satellite Produces Beautiful Global Vegetation Map - Wired Science
A satellite barely bigger than a washing machine and launched just two months ago has already made this great map of the world’s vegetation. 
The Belgian-built satellite called Proba-V is the latest in the European Space Agency’s PROBA series of small satellites and will take over vegetation monitoring duties from the Spot-4 and Spot-5 satellites, which are at the end of a 15-year mission.
Proba-V will circle the Earth 14 times a day, covering the entire globe every two days with its 100-meter resolution camera. Every 10 days, a new 200,000 megapixel image of the world’s vegetation will be produced.

Tiny New Satellite Produces Beautiful Global Vegetation Map - Wired Science

A satellite barely bigger than a washing machine and launched just two months ago has already made this great map of the world’s vegetation. 

The Belgian-built satellite called Proba-V is the latest in the European Space Agency’s PROBA series of small satellites and will take over vegetation monitoring duties from the Spot-4 and Spot-5 satellites, which are at the end of a 15-year mission.

Proba-V will circle the Earth 14 times a day, covering the entire globe every two days with its 100-meter resolution camera. Every 10 days, a new 200,000 megapixel image of the world’s vegetation will be produced.

MIT tool connects the dots of your life through Gmail metadata



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How much does the metadata gathered in your inbox reveal about you? Quite a lot, judging by what researchers at the MIT Media Lab have managed to accomplish with Immersion. They’ve built a web app that — once you grant it permission to do so — digs through your email history to piece together a “people-centric view of your email life.” What does Immersion look at, exactly? Only the senders, recipients (including those CC’d), and timestamps within your email archives. It steers clear of subject lines and the actual bodies of your messages. Still, the end result is fairly impressive depending on how much Immersion has to work with. What first appears to be an arbitrary list of people you’ve contacted is actually linked together in logical ways. (Again, this will depend largely on how far back your email trail goes.)
"All of this data is about people. Data basically doesn’t make sense without humans." César Hidalgo, one of the creators behind Immersion, told The Boston Globe. “When you see it all together, it is, in a way, an out-of-body experience.” Your takeaway may not be that emotional, but Immersion succeeds in showing that, even with limited information like metadata, when collected in bulk, you can visualize the relationships contained within. You can try it at the source below, but keep in mind you’ll need to grant MIT access to your Google account for the purpose.

MIT tool connects the dots of your life through Gmail metadata

How much does the metadata gathered in your inbox reveal about you? Quite a lot, judging by what researchers at the MIT Media Lab have managed to accomplish with Immersion. They’ve built a web app that — once you grant it permission to do so — digs through your email history to piece together a “people-centric view of your email life.” What does Immersion look at, exactly? Only the senders, recipients (including those CC’d), and timestamps within your email archives. It steers clear of subject lines and the actual bodies of your messages. Still, the end result is fairly impressive depending on how much Immersion has to work with. What first appears to be an arbitrary list of people you’ve contacted is actually linked together in logical ways. (Again, this will depend largely on how far back your email trail goes.)

"All of this data is about people. Data basically doesn’t make sense without humans." César Hidalgo, one of the creators behind Immersion, told The Boston Globe. “When you see it all together, it is, in a way, an out-of-body experience.” Your takeaway may not be that emotional, but Immersion succeeds in showing that, even with limited information like metadata, when collected in bulk, you can visualize the relationships contained within. You can try it at the source below, but keep in mind you’ll need to grant MIT access to your Google account for the purpose.

Garmin HUD projects directions onto your windshield | The Car Tech blog
Smartphones have pretty much taken over as the default navigation tool for many drivers. However, some locales (including our home state of California) have outright banned smartphone use in the  car: no windshield mounts, no dashboard cradles. So, how are you going to get your turn-by-turn directions when looking at your phone is illegal? Today, Garmin announced a new way to interact with its StreetPilot and Navigon smartphone navigation apps: the HUD.
HUD — short for head-up display — sits on the dashboard at the base of the windshield, where it projects navigation data upwards into the driver’s line of sight, either onto a transparent film affixed to the windshield glass or a reflector lens that attaches to the HUD device. Both the film and reflector lens are included with the device.
Garmin states that HUD will automatically adjust the brightness of its projections, so that the display remains visible in direct sunlight or at night. The device will be powered by a 12V charging cable with an integrated USB port for keeping your smartphone charged as well.

Garmin HUD projects directions onto your windshield | The Car Tech blog

Smartphones have pretty much taken over as the default navigation tool for many drivers. However, some locales (including our home state of California) have outright banned smartphone use in the car: no windshield mounts, no dashboard cradles. So, how are you going to get your turn-by-turn directions when looking at your phone is illegal? Today, Garmin announced a new way to interact with its StreetPilot and Navigon smartphone navigation apps: the HUD.

HUD — short for head-up display — sits on the dashboard at the base of the windshield, where it projects navigation data upwards into the driver’s line of sight, either onto a transparent film affixed to the windshield glass or a reflector lens that attaches to the HUD device. Both the film and reflector lens are included with the device.

Garmin states that HUD will automatically adjust the brightness of its projections, so that the display remains visible in direct sunlight or at night. The device will be powered by a 12V charging cable with an integrated USB port for keeping your smartphone charged as well.

With 40% of the world on social networks here’s what happens every 24 hours:
Over 350 million photos are uploaded to Facebook
More than 2 billion search queries are performed on Twitter
172,800 new users signed up to LinkedIn
432,000 Vine videos are shared on Twitter
One billion Likes are generated on Instagram
210 billion emails are sent and received – and 80 percent of them are spam.
(via What Happens In Social Media Every 24 Hours? The Numbers Will Blow Your Mind [INFOGRAPHIC] - AllTwitter)

With 40% of the world on social networks here’s what happens every 24 hours:

  • Over 350 million photos are uploaded to Facebook
  • More than 2 billion search queries are performed on Twitter
  • 172,800 new users signed up to LinkedIn
  • 432,000 Vine videos are shared on Twitter
  • One billion Likes are generated on Instagram
  • 210 billion emails are sent and received – and 80 percent of them are spam.

(via What Happens In Social Media Every 24 Hours? The Numbers Will Blow Your Mind [INFOGRAPHIC] - AllTwitter)

(via ibmsocialbiz)