High-octane bacteria could ease pain at the pump: Engineered E. coli mass-produce key precursor to potent biofuel
New lines of engineered bacteria can tailor-make key precursors of high-octane biofuels that could one day replace gasoline, scientists at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and the Department of Systems Biology at Harvard Medical School report in the June 24 online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-06-high-octane-bacteria-ease-pain-coli.html#jCp

High-octane bacteria could ease pain at the pump: Engineered E. coli mass-produce key precursor to potent biofuel

New lines of engineered bacteria can tailor-make key precursors of high-octane biofuels that could one day replace gasoline, scientists at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and the Department of Systems Biology at Harvard Medical School report in the June 24 online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Researchers develop a new candidate for a cleaner, greener and renewable diesel fuel (PhysOrg.com) — A class of chemical compounds best known today for fragrance and flavor may one day provide the clean, green and renewable fuel with which truck and auto drivers fill their tanks. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) have engineered Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria to generate significant quantities of methyl ketone compounds from glucose. In subsequent tests, these methyl ketones yielded high cetane numbers – a diesel fuel rating comparable to the octane number for gasoline – making them strong candidates for the production of advanced biofuels

Researchers develop a new candidate for a cleaner, greener and renewable diesel fuel (PhysOrg.com) — A class of chemical compounds best known today for fragrance and flavor may one day provide the clean, green and renewable fuel with which truck and auto drivers fill their tanks. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) have engineered Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria to generate significant quantities of methyl ketone compounds from glucose. In subsequent tests, these methyl ketones yielded high cetane numbers – a diesel fuel rating comparable to the octane number for gasoline – making them strong candidates for the production of advanced biofuels

Cheese-Making Bacteria Could Be Used To Produce Biofuels  A team at Concordia University recently discovered a novel way to produce sustainable biofuels using bacteria commonly used to transform milk into cheese. According to the study, professors Vincent Martin and  his PhD student Andrew Wieczorek believe that the bacteria Lactococcus lactis, could digest plant matter to turn it into biofuel.

Cheese-Making Bacteria Could Be Used To Produce Biofuels  A team at Concordia University recently discovered a novel way to produce sustainable biofuels using bacteria commonly used to transform milk into cheese. According to the study, professors Vincent Martin and his PhD student Andrew Wieczorek believe that the bacteria Lactococcus lactis, could digest plant matter to turn it into biofuel.