Kinect Installation Lets Visitors Control A Living Human Cell [Video] - PSFK
Living Cell is an interactive installation created by design agency Clever Franke for the research group Eriba Institute.
The data visualisation work allows you to physically step inside a cell, walk around its organelles and influence its processes. Visitors can discover information about specific parts of the cell by walking into the cell and touching the part of interest. The lifetime of the cell is approximately an hour; if there is no interference from the visitors eventually the cell will die and be born again.

Kinect Installation Lets Visitors Control A Living Human Cell [Video] - PSFK

Living Cell is an interactive installation created by design agency Clever Franke for the research group Eriba Institute.

The data visualisation work allows you to physically step inside a cell, walk around its organelles and influence its processes. Visitors can discover information about specific parts of the cell by walking into the cell and touching the part of interest. The lifetime of the cell is approximately an hour; if there is no interference from the visitors eventually the cell will die and be born again.

3D Printer for Living Things

Solve for X: Austen Heinz on democratizing creation

Mindblowing presentation about future applications of DNA laser printer. Have you ever wondered how many years will pass since we as human species become able to “freely design” living organisms. This video prove it is quite near future.”  via personalfactory:

(via designersofthings)

Biopunk: DIY Scientists Hack the Software of Life 

It is a sign of the times, ad the great strides that science has made, that we are able to show you this book cover.  Much as computer scientists of the late 20th century got their start in garages working on projects that were risky and adventurous, garage biologists are starting to crop up all over the United States.
It remains to be seen if projects like this can really get past all of the regulatory hurdles and still yield useful results, but then again, people wondered similar things about the companies that are tech giants today.
The book pictured is full of analysis and journalism on these “biopunks.”  Check out a review.
Oh, what the hell.  We’ll make it a question.  What do you think about this?

via betterworlds:

Biopunk: DIY Scientists Hack the Software of Life

It is a sign of the times, ad the great strides that science has made, that we are able to show you this book cover.  Much as computer scientists of the late 20th century got their start in garages working on projects that were risky and adventurous, garage biologists are starting to crop up all over the United States.

It remains to be seen if projects like this can really get past all of the regulatory hurdles and still yield useful results, but then again, people wondered similar things about the companies that are tech giants today.

The book pictured is full of analysis and journalism on these “biopunks.”  Check out a review.

Oh, what the hell.  We’ll make it a question.  What do you think about this?

via betterworlds:

Special Laser Gives Real-Time View Inside Living Cells for the First Time
Source: Discover

From the perspective of a kidney cell, light is a toxic substance: It spends its life hidden under layers of skin and guts, far away from any kind of intense illumination. As a result, biologists using microscopes to study kidney cells and other living cells are always racing the clock—the very light required to see the cell will also kill it. But light toxicity is no longer an issue with the invention of a new microscope that uses focused sheets of light to create 3-D movies of living cells.
The technique is called Bessel beam plane illumination microscopy, and it works by shooting thin planes of light toward the side of a cell, illuminating the specific plane the microscope is focusing on, instead of drowning the entire cell in top-down light.

“We have for the first time a technology that allows you to look at the three-dimensional complexity of what’s going on, at the sort of rates at which things happen within cells,” Dr [Eric] Betzig [the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) physicist who led the research] said. [BBC]

In the past, many imaging techniques worked only with dead cells.

“You can get a lot of information looking at fixed, dead cells – high-resolution information – but you’d still like to be able to see dynamics,” he told BBC News. “There’s a lot you can learn from actually watching things wiggle around.” [BBC]

Special Laser Gives Real-Time View Inside Living Cells for the First Time

Source: Discover

From the perspective of a kidney cell, light is a toxic substance: It spends its life hidden under layers of skin and guts, far away from any kind of intense illumination. As a result, biologists using microscopes to study kidney cells and other living cells are always racing the clock—the very light required to see the cell will also kill it. But light toxicity is no longer an issue with the invention of a new microscope that uses focused sheets of light to create 3-D movies of living cells.

The technique is called Bessel beam plane illumination microscopy, and it works by shooting thin planes of light toward the side of a cell, illuminating the specific plane the microscope is focusing on, instead of drowning the entire cell in top-down light.

“We have for the first time a technology that allows you to look at the three-dimensional complexity of what’s going on, at the sort of rates at which things happen within cells,” Dr [Eric] Betzig [the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) physicist who led the research] said. [BBC]

In the past, many imaging techniques worked only with dead cells.

“You can get a lot of information looking at fixed, dead cells – high-resolution information – but you’d still like to be able to see dynamics,” he told BBC News. “There’s a lot you can learn from actually watching things wiggle around.” [BBC]

Truly New Intelligence | New Life Form, 3X More Stars in the Universe

Hours before their special news conference today, the cat is out of the bag: NASA has discovered a completely new life form that doesn’t share the biological building blocks of anything currently living in planet Earth. This changes everything.

gizmodo_logoAt their conference today, NASA scientist Felisa Wolfe Simon will announce that they have found a bacteria whose DNA is completely alien to what we know today. Instead of using phosphorus, the bacteria uses arsenic. All life on Earth is made of six components: carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and sulfur. Every being, from the smallest amoeba to the largest whale, share the same life stream. Our DNA blocks are all the same.

                                          * * *

How many stars in the universe? Maybe 300 sextillion | Seattle Post Intelligencer

Picture
A dense swarm of stars called Omega Centauri, as seen through a NASA telescope. (Getty Images)

There might be three times more stars in the universe than astronomers thought. That’s the gist of a report published Wednesday, which says scientists may have vastly underestimated the number of red dwarf stars.

According to the report, it’s likely there are about 300 sextillion stars in the universe. A little perspective: That’s the number you get when you multiply 3 trillion by 100 billion.

First All-Digital Science Textbook Will Be Free | Wired Science | Wired.com

Textbooks designed to be all-digital and interactive from the start (as opposed to simply converting print books) could bring not only salvation to schools because they’re easily updated, but also a revolution in how students learn science.

IBM was selected for its contributions to the EuResist research project for AIDS treatment as a Computerworld Honors Program Laureate for 2008.

Developed by IBM researchers in Haifa, Israel, the project’s new technologies and mathematical models are providing a smarter and more efficient way to choose the best drugs and drug combinations for any given HIV genetic variant. (via eHealthNews.EU Portal - IBM and EU Partners Create a Better Way to Fight AIDS Virus)

IBM was selected for its contributions to the EuResist research project for AIDS treatment as a Computerworld Honors Program Laureate for 2008.

Developed by IBM researchers in Haifa, Israel, the project’s new technologies and mathematical models are providing a smarter and more efficient way to choose the best drugs and drug combinations for any given HIV genetic variant. (via eHealthNews.EU Portal - IBM and EU Partners Create a Better Way to Fight AIDS Virus)

Registry of Standard Biological Parts.
…is a collection of ~3200 genetic parts that can be mixed and matched to build synthetic biology devices and systems. Founded in 2003 at MIT, the Registry is part of the Synthetic Biology community’s efforts to make biology easier to engineer. It provides a resource of available genetic parts to iGEM teams and academic labs. (via partsregistry.org)

Registry of Standard Biological Parts.

…is a collection of ~3200 genetic parts that can be mixed and matched to build synthetic biology devices and systems. Founded in 2003 at MIT, the Registry is part of the Synthetic Biology community’s efforts to make biology easier to engineer. It provides a resource of available genetic parts to iGEM teams and academic labs. (via partsregistry.org)

Despite many experts’ doubt that whole-genome sequencing could be done for $1,000, let alone a 10th that much, BioNanomatrix believes it can reach the $100 target in five years. The reason for its optimism: company founder Han Cao has created a chip that uses nanofluidics and a series of branching, ever-narrowin­g channels to allow researchers, for the first time, to isolate and image very long strands of individual DNA molecules. (via Technology Review: $100 Genome)

Despite many experts’ doubt that whole-genome sequencing could be done for $1,000, let alone a 10th that much, BioNanomatrix believes it can reach the $100 target in five years. The reason for its optimism: company founder Han Cao has created a chip that uses nanofluidics and a series of branching, ever-narrowin­g channels to allow researchers, for the first time, to isolate and image very long strands of individual DNA molecules. (via Technology Review: $100 Genome)

Crucial breakthroughs in the treatment of many common diseases such as diabetes and Parkinson’s could be achieved by harnessing a powerful scientific approach called systems biology, according to leading scientists from across Europe. Systems biology is a rapidly advancing field that combines empirical, mathematical and computational techniques to gain understanding of complex biological and physiological phenomena. (via Key to future medical breakthroughs is systems biology)

Crucial breakthroughs in the treatment of many common diseases such as diabetes and Parkinson’s could be achieved by harnessing a powerful scientific approach called systems biology, according to leading scientists from across Europe. Systems biology is a rapidly advancing field that combines empirical, mathematical and computational techniques to gain understanding of complex biological and physiological phenomena. (via Key to future medical breakthroughs is systems biology)