High-octane bacteria could ease pain at the pump: Engineered E. coli mass-produce key precursor to potent biofuel
New lines of engineered bacteria can tailor-make key precursors of high-octane biofuels that could one day replace gasoline, scientists at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and the Department of Systems Biology at Harvard Medical School report in the June 24 online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-06-high-octane-bacteria-ease-pain-coli.html#jCp

High-octane bacteria could ease pain at the pump: Engineered E. coli mass-produce key precursor to potent biofuel

New lines of engineered bacteria can tailor-make key precursors of high-octane biofuels that could one day replace gasoline, scientists at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and the Department of Systems Biology at Harvard Medical School report in the June 24 online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Human Clone Embryonic Stem Cell Lines - Business Insider
Researchers announced Wednesday, May 15, in the journal Cell that they’ve been able to make stable colonies of embryonic stem cells by injecting the DNA from ‘adult’ human cells into a human egg cell emptied out of its genetic material.
"Our finding offers new ways of generating stem cells for patients with dysfunctional or damaged tissues and organs," study researcher Shoukhrat Mitalipov of Oregon Health & Science University, said in a press release. “Such stem cells can regenerate and replace those damaged cells and tissues and alleviate diseases that affect millions of people.”
This technique they used to make these stem cells is called somatic cell nuclear transfer, and is the same technique used to clone animals, like Dolly the sheep.
To put it in very simplified terms: the researchers first harvest a human egg from a woman’s ovaries and completely remove her genetic material from the egg. Then, they take a human skin cell and insert it into the egg using an inactivated virus which fuses the two cells. The embryo that grows from this would be a genetic copy of the person that donated the cell. 
Read more:

Human Clone Embryonic Stem Cell Lines - Business Insider

Researchers announced Wednesday, May 15, in the journal Cell that they’ve been able to make stable colonies of embryonic stem cells by injecting the DNA from ‘adult’ human cells into a human egg cell emptied out of its genetic material.

"Our finding offers new ways of generating stem cells for patients with dysfunctional or damaged tissues and organs," study researcher Shoukhrat Mitalipov of Oregon Health & Science University, said in a press release. “Such stem cells can regenerate and replace those damaged cells and tissues and alleviate diseases that affect millions of people.”

This technique they used to make these stem cells is called somatic cell nuclear transfer, and is the same technique used to clone animals, like Dolly the sheep.

To put it in very simplified terms: the researchers first harvest a human egg from a woman’s ovaries and completely remove her genetic material from the egg. Then, they take a human skin cell and insert it into the egg using an inactivated virus which fuses the two cells. The embryo that grows from this would be a genetic copy of the person that donated the cell. 

joshbyard:

The Gamification of Synthetic Biology Continues: Creators of FoldIt Follow up With RNA Transformation Game

Meet eteRNA, your new internet addiction. Not only is it a super-fun way to procrastinate on that thing you should be doing, it also helps to advance biology’s understanding of RNA and its synthesis- in a big way.

Scientists from Stanford University and Carnegie Mellon University have developed eteRNA as a successor to Foldit, a popular internet-based game that proved the pattern-matching skills of amateurs could outperform some of the best protein-folding algorithms designed by scientists.

They’re hedging their bets that eteRNA will work similarly - and are even funding the real-life synthesis of the weekly winner’s RNA molecule to see if it really does fold the same way the game predicts it should. 

The scientists hope to tap the internet’s ability to harness what is described as “collective intelligence,” the collaborative potential of hundreds or thousands of human minds linked together.

Using games to harvest participation from amateurs exploits a resource which the social scientist Clay Shirky recently described as the “cognitive surplus” - the idea that together, as a collection of amateurs, we internet people make a very good algorithm because we react to information presented in a game, get better at it as we go along, and make informed decisions based on what has or hasn’t worked for us in the past. 

“We’re the leading edge in asking nonexperts to do really complicated things online,” says Dr. Treuille, an assistant professor of computer science at Carnegie Mellon and one of the original masterminds behind the game. “RNA are beautiful molecules. They are very simple and they self-assemble into complex shapes. From the scientific side, there is an RNA revolution going on. The complexity of life may be due to RNA signaling.”

“This [project] is like putting a molecular chess game in people’s hands at a massive level,” he continues. “I think of this as opening up science. I think we are democratizing science.”

And, so far, the democratisation is working. Although the creators warn that game players may start to see legal and ethical issues in gameplay down the road, for now, the collective intelligence is trumping professionally designed algorithms. Significantly, not only do humans outperform their computer adversaries, but the human strategies developed during the course of the game are significantly more flexible and adaptable than those of the algorithms they’re pitted against.

fuckyeahmolecularbiology:

Muscle tissue produced with a 3D printer.
San Diego startup Organovo has developed a bioprinting technique which allows it to create human tissue starting with any cell source. The printer deposits lines of cells closely together, where they are allowed to grow and interconnect until they form working muscle tissue.


Unlike other experimental approaches that utilize ink-jet printers to deposit cells, Organovo’s technology enables cells to interact with each other the way they do in the body. How? They are packed tightly together, sandwiched, if you will, and incubated. This prompts them to cleave to each other and interchange chemical signals. When printed, the cells are grouped together in a paste that helps them grow, migrate, and align themselves properly. In the case of muscle cells, the way they orient themselves in the same direction allow for contractions of the tissue.


The company hopes to one day build entire organs for transplants. Because tissue is able to be built from a patient’s own cells, the risk of rejection would be very low.
via 8bitfuture:

Muscle tissue produced with a 3D printer.

San Diego startup Organovo has developed a bioprinting technique which allows it to create human tissue starting with any cell source. The printer deposits lines of cells closely together, where they are allowed to grow and interconnect until they form working muscle tissue.

Unlike other experimental approaches that utilize ink-jet printers to deposit cells, Organovo’s technology enables cells to interact with each other the way they do in the body. How? They are packed tightly together, sandwiched, if you will, and incubated. This prompts them to cleave to each other and interchange chemical signals. When printed, the cells are grouped together in a paste that helps them grow, migrate, and align themselves properly. In the case of muscle cells, the way they orient themselves in the same direction allow for contractions of the tissue.

The company hopes to one day build entire organs for transplants. Because tissue is able to be built from a patient’s own cells, the risk of rejection would be very low.

via 8bitfuture:

(via 8bitfuture)

Level Up: Gamers Become Scientists By Competing To Design The Best RNA Molecules | Fast Company
EteRNA, the new project from the brains behind FoldIt, wants to create  and study RNA molecules to help cure diseases. Turn out if you give a  gamer a chance, they can design RNA molecules far better than any  computer.

Level Up: Gamers Become Scientists By Competing To Design The Best RNA Molecules | Fast Company

EteRNA, the new project from the brains behind FoldIt, wants to create and study RNA molecules to help cure diseases. Turn out if you give a gamer a chance, they can design RNA molecules far better than any computer.

How 3-D Printing & Augmented Reality Can Help Design Better Drugs

And now for today’s awesome science update: Arthur Olson’s Molecular Graphics Lab uses 3-D printers to spit out physical models of drugs and enzymes, and attaches augmented-reality tags to them so that computer vision can help researchers find the optimal fit. Think of it like playing with a Rubik’s cube, except the solution may help cure HIV.

Read More

fastcompany:

(via fastcompany)

Nanolithography: Flexible patterning of the cellular microenvironment
Source: Small Times
The ability to place individual cells at defined  locations and control their microenvironment has numerous applications  in the field of cell biology.  Cells respond to their microenvironment and the resulting extracellular  signals [1, 2]. The ability to control the cellular microenvironment  enables investigation of biochemical and topological cues on various  cell behavior, such as cell adhesion, differentiation, and molecular  signaling pathways.
The nanolithography platform, NLP 2000, was designed to provide a simple solution to  achieve high precision placement of nano- to micro-sized features with  nanoscale precision. The process of deposition of material is based on  Dip Pen Nanolithography (DPN), an established method of nanofabrication  in which materials are deposited onto a surface using a sharp tip [9,  10]. The tool is capable of patterning a wide range of materials with  feature sizes from 50nm to 10µm over an area of 40 x 40mm. The features  can be placed with nanoscale precision using a three-axis closed-loop  stage.

Nanolithography: Flexible patterning of the cellular microenvironment

Source: Small Times

The ability to place individual cells at defined locations and control their microenvironment has numerous applications in the field of cell biology. Cells respond to their microenvironment and the resulting extracellular signals [1, 2]. The ability to control the cellular microenvironment enables investigation of biochemical and topological cues on various cell behavior, such as cell adhesion, differentiation, and molecular signaling pathways.

The nanolithography platform, NLP 2000, was designed to provide a simple solution to achieve high precision placement of nano- to micro-sized features with nanoscale precision. The process of deposition of material is based on Dip Pen Nanolithography (DPN), an established method of nanofabrication in which materials are deposited onto a surface using a sharp tip [9, 10]. The tool is capable of patterning a wide range of materials with feature sizes from 50nm to 10µm over an area of 40 x 40mm. The features can be placed with nanoscale precision using a three-axis closed-loop stage.

infoneernet:

New Device Prints Human Tissue

Invetech has delivered what it calls the “world’s first production model 3D bio-printer” to Organovo, developers of the proprietary NovoGen bioprinting technology. Organovo will in turn supply the devices to institutions investigating human tissue repair and organ replacement.
Keith Murphy, CEO of Organovo, based in San Diego, said the units represent a breakthrough because they provide for the first time a flexible technology platform for organizations working on many different types of tissue construction and organ replacement.
“Scientists and engineers can use the 3D bio printers to enable placing cells of almost any type into a desired pattern in 3D,” said Murphy. “Researchers can place liver cells on a preformed scaffold, support kidney cells with a co-printed scaffold, or form adjacent layers of epithelial and stromal soft tissue that grow into a mature tooth. Ultimately the idea would be for surgeons to have tissue on demand for various uses, and the best way to do that is get a number of bio-printers into the hands of researchers and give them the ability to make three dimensional tissues on demand.”

» via Live Science

infoneernet:

New Device Prints Human Tissue

Invetech has delivered what it calls the “world’s first production model 3D bio-printer” to Organovo, developers of the proprietary NovoGen bioprinting technology. Organovo will in turn supply the devices to institutions investigating human tissue repair and organ replacement.

Keith Murphy, CEO of Organovo, based in San Diego, said the units represent a breakthrough because they provide for the first time a flexible technology platform for organizations working on many different types of tissue construction and organ replacement.

“Scientists and engineers can use the 3D bio printers to enable placing cells of almost any type into a desired pattern in 3D,” said Murphy. “Researchers can place liver cells on a preformed scaffold, support kidney cells with a co-printed scaffold, or form adjacent layers of epithelial and stromal soft tissue that grow into a mature tooth. Ultimately the idea would be for surgeons to have tissue on demand for various uses, and the best way to do that is get a number of bio-printers into the hands of researchers and give them the ability to make three dimensional tissues on demand.”

» via Live Science

Janet Marchibroda is the chief health care officer of IBM 
"As President Obama and Congress take on what the president in his American Medical Association speech called the "ticking time bomb" of health care costs, they need to know that they can’t succeed without harnessing the massive data generated by modern medicine. Getting the best information into the hands of doctors and patients, while protecting patient privacy, is not just a desire but an overriding need if we are to get a handle on spiraling costs and also improve care. "(read the rest @ There Can Be No Health Care Reform Without An Information Revolution - Forbes.com)

Janet Marchibroda is the chief health care officer of IBM

"As President Obama and Congress take on what the president in his American Medical Association speech called the "ticking time bomb" of health care costs, they need to know that they can’t succeed without harnessing the massive data generated by modern medicine. Getting the best information into the hands of doctors and patients, while protecting patient privacy, is not just a desire but an overriding need if we are to get a handle on spiraling costs and also improve care. "(read the rest @ There Can Be No Health Care Reform Without An Information Revolution - Forbes.com)

Nearly 900,000 Canadians regularly access home care, and the numbers are growing. From 1995 and 2002, the number of those receiving home care increased by more than 60%. The Victoria Order of Nurses (VON) is Canada’s largest, national, not-for-profit home and community care organization. IBM will provide VON with new business processes and clinical technologies, including mobile wireless hand-held devices. The system will help hundreds of home healthcare providers: * Schedule patient appointments * Collect, share and access patient information in real-time * Access human resources and benefits administration; and * Automate finance and accounting processes (via IBM Healthcare solutions)

Nearly 900,000 Canadians regularly access home care, and the numbers are growing. From 1995 and 2002, the number of those receiving home care increased by more than 60%. The Victoria Order of Nurses (VON) is Canada’s largest, national, not-for-profit home and community care organization. IBM will provide VON with new business processes and clinical technologies, including mobile wireless hand-held devices. The system will help hundreds of home healthcare providers: * Schedule patient appointments * Collect, share and access patient information in real-time * Access human resources and benefits administration; and * Automate finance and accounting processes (via IBM Healthcare solutions)