LED lights could become network devices, too | CNET News
Fraunhofer Institute has demonstrated how conventional LED lighting could be used to send and receive data to laptops or smartphones, with speeds up to 3Gbps.

Today, you’ve got wireless networks that use radio waves and you’ve got optical networks that use light traveling in tiny glass fibers. Tomorrow, if Fraunhofer Institute research comes to fruition, a combination of the two could turn living-room lights into network devices.
The German applied-research lab has developed wireless networking that uses rapidly blinking LEDs to transmit data through the air. The technology can send data at speeds up to 1 gigabit per second — and by using three colors of light, triple that data rate is possible, Fraunhofer said.

LED lights could become network devices, too | CNET News

Fraunhofer Institute has demonstrated how conventional LED lighting could be used to send and receive data to laptops or smartphones, with speeds up to 3Gbps.

Today, you’ve got wireless networks that use radio waves and you’ve got optical networks that use light traveling in tiny glass fibers. Tomorrow, if Fraunhofer Institute research comes to fruition, a combination of the two could turn living-room lights into network devices.

The German applied-research lab has developed wireless networking that uses rapidly blinking LEDs to transmit data through the air. The technology can send data at speeds up to 1 gigabit per second — and by using three colors of light, triple that data rate is possible, Fraunhofer said.

We estimate 3.74 million (3.7%) US TV subscribers cut their TV subscriptions 2008-12 to rely solely on Netflix, Over the Air, Online, etc, 1.08 million (1.1%) in 2012 alone. We forecast US TV cord cutter households will reach 4.7 million (4.7%) by year-end 2013.

 It’s Time to Fix the Pitifully Slow, Expensive Internet Access in the U.S. | Wired.com
Here are the facts: Approximately 19 million Americans can’t subscribe to high-speed internet access because they live in areas that private companies believe are too expensive to serve. Internet access is still very expensive compared to the rest of the developed world – a third of Americans don’t or can’t subscribe.
Internet access in America remains relatively slow – particularly when it comes to upload speeds, the very feature necessary for cloud computing and creating user-generated content. Cable companies dominate wired internet access and face no real competition or pricing pressure; telcos like Verizon and AT&T have retreated to wireless, which will never be a full substitute for wired capacity; and we still have no plan for a nation-wide upgrade to fiber.

 It’s Time to Fix the Pitifully Slow, Expensive Internet Access in the U.S. | Wired.com

Here are the facts: Approximately 19 million Americans can’t subscribe to high-speed internet access because they live in areas that private companies believe are too expensive to serve. Internet access is still very expensive compared to the rest of the developed world – a third of Americans don’t or can’t subscribe.

Internet access in America remains relatively slow – particularly when it comes to upload speeds, the very feature necessary for cloud computing and creating user-generated content. Cable companies dominate wired internet access and face no real competition or pricing pressure; telcos like Verizon and AT&T have retreated to wireless, which will never be a full substitute for wired capacity; and we still have no plan for a nation-wide upgrade to fiber.

Forget 3G and 4G, terahertz could make cell phones 1,000 times faster | BGR.com
Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh announced that they have discovered a means of wirelessly transmitting data thousands of times faster than current standards, PCMag reported on Wednesday. The team is led by Hrvoje Petek, a physics and chemistry professor at the university, who has theoretically found a way to transmit data between devices in the terahertz frequency. Petek’s discovery of “a physical basis for terahertz bandwidth” could potentially be used to leverage the “portion of the electromagnetic spectrum between infrared and microwave light” and transmit data at rates 1,000 times faster than today’s wireless standards, which are limited to the gigahertz frequency. “The ability to modulate light with such a bandwidth could increase the amount of information carried by more than 1,000 times when compared to the volume carried with today’s technologies,” Petek said. “Needless to say, this has been a long-awaited discovery in the field.”
Read

Forget 3G and 4G, terahertz could make cell phones 1,000 times faster | BGR.com

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh announced that they have discovered a means of wirelessly transmitting data thousands of times faster than current standards, PCMag reported on Wednesday. The team is led by Hrvoje Petek, a physics and chemistry professor at the university, who has theoretically found a way to transmit data between devices in the terahertz frequency. Petek’s discovery of “a physical basis for terahertz bandwidth” could potentially be used to leverage the “portion of the electromagnetic spectrum between infrared and microwave light” and transmit data at rates 1,000 times faster than today’s wireless standards, which are limited to the gigahertz frequency. “The ability to modulate light with such a bandwidth could increase the amount of information carried by more than 1,000 times when compared to the volume carried with today’s technologies,” Petek said. “Needless to say, this has been a long-awaited discovery in the field.”

Read

Rural Broadband Could Fill Those White Spaces - Ina Fried - News - AllThingsD
On the one hand, the decision by the Federal Communications Commission last week to approve the first devices to run in the “white spaces” between television channels was a modest one.
The decision initially covers only one product, and is limited to the pilot city of Wilmington, N.C.
But backers of the technology hope those white spaces prove as big a  boost to innovation as the unlicensed spectrum that gave birth to Wi-Fi.
“We see this as a multibillion-dollar industry,” said Rod Dir, CEO of  Spectrum Bridge, the company whose database is a key component of the  white spaces system approved by the FCC.
White spaces, for the uninitiated, are the spectrum spots in between  TV channels. Like the 2.4GHZ spectrum used by several flavors of Wi-Fi,  the white spaces are unlicensed spectrum, meaning any device that agrees  to play nice with others and gains regulatory approval can operate in  the frequency. Devices that are approved to operate in the white spaces  spectrum are required to check in with a database to see which channels  are available. (For more, check out AllThingsD’s handy FAQ post from last week.)
Over time, analysts imagine a range of wireless and wired devices  that can use the white spaces as a sort of “Super Wi-Fi” that can  operate over greater distance and perform better indoors.

Rural Broadband Could Fill Those White Spaces - Ina Fried - News - AllThingsD

On the one hand, the decision by the Federal Communications Commission last week to approve the first devices to run in the “white spaces” between television channels was a modest one.

The decision initially covers only one product, and is limited to the pilot city of Wilmington, N.C.

But backers of the technology hope those white spaces prove as big a boost to innovation as the unlicensed spectrum that gave birth to Wi-Fi.

“We see this as a multibillion-dollar industry,” said Rod Dir, CEO of Spectrum Bridge, the company whose database is a key component of the white spaces system approved by the FCC.

White spaces, for the uninitiated, are the spectrum spots in between TV channels. Like the 2.4GHZ spectrum used by several flavors of Wi-Fi, the white spaces are unlicensed spectrum, meaning any device that agrees to play nice with others and gains regulatory approval can operate in the frequency. Devices that are approved to operate in the white spaces spectrum are required to check in with a database to see which channels are available. (For more, check out AllThingsD’s handy FAQ post from last week.)

Over time, analysts imagine a range of wireless and wired devices that can use the white spaces as a sort of “Super Wi-Fi” that can operate over greater distance and perform better indoors.

It’s absurd to think that rebuilding the nations roads and bridges and water systems, not to mention investing in broadband and mass transit, couldn’t return more than 2.4 percent over time. In fact, the decision is more obvious even than that: if we put those investments off, we’ll still have to make them later, when borrowing costs will be higher and bridges and roads that need to be repaired now are so dilapidated that they need to be fully rebuilt.

Transmitting high-speed data via LED room lights | KurzweilAI
Scientists from the Fraunhofer Institute for Telecommunications, Heinrich Hertz Institute (HHI) in Berlin have developed a new high-speed data transmission technology for video data.
Using an optical WLAN, the scientists were able to transfer data at a rate of 100 megabits per second over a ten square meters area without any loss, by modulating white LEDs in the ceiling.
The scientists were able to transfer four videos at HD quality to four different laptops at the same time. A simple photodiode on the laptop or other devices acts as a receiver.One disadvantage is that when something gets between the light and the photodiode, the transfer is impaired.
The new transmission technology is suitable for hospitals, where high data rates are required, but radio transmissions are not allowed — it could allow for controlling wireless surgical robots or sending x-ray images. In airplanes, passenger could view their own entertainment program on a display, saving aircraft manufacturers the cost and weight of miles of cables

Transmitting high-speed data via LED room lights | KurzweilAI

Scientists from the Fraunhofer Institute for Telecommunications, Heinrich Hertz Institute (HHI) in Berlin have developed a new high-speed data transmission technology for video data.

Using an optical WLAN, the scientists were able to transfer data at a rate of 100 megabits per second over a ten square meters area without any loss, by modulating white LEDs in the ceiling.

The scientists were able to transfer four videos at HD quality to four different laptops at the same time. A simple photodiode on the laptop or other devices acts as a receiver.One disadvantage is that when something gets between the light and the photodiode, the transfer is impaired.

The new transmission technology is suitable for hospitals, where high data rates are required, but radio transmissions are not allowed — it could allow for controlling wireless surgical robots or sending x-ray images. In airplanes, passenger could view their own entertainment program on a display, saving aircraft manufacturers the cost and weight of miles of cables