The Coming Battle for Africa’s Internet
[Seneweb] is one of several laying links in what they hope could become as much as 100,000 miles of broadband wiring criss-crossing the world’s second-largest continent like the 21st century version of a transcontinental railway. The connections start with undersea cables and extend onshore towards 3G towers within reception range of the continent’s growing middle class.That burgeoning bourgeoisie is Africa’s lead variable, and Herlihy ballparks its current mass at 300 million people, each earning between $2,000 and $5,000 yearly — not always enough to keep a router in the living room lit, but certainly enough to pay off a BlackBerry bill. The service they enjoy, smoother than its American equivalent, runs off towers that are newer and more adaptable to data transfers, which is rendering Africa’s telecom transition — from a continent of voice phones to one of pocket PCs — more scalable than expected. "It’s just happening faster and faster than anybody could have imagined," Herlihy says.

 The Coming Battle for Africa’s Internet

[Seneweb] is one of several laying links in what they hope could become as much as 100,000 miles of broadband wiring criss-crossing the world’s second-largest continent like the 21st century version of a transcontinental railway. The connections start with undersea cables and extend onshore towards 3G towers within reception range of the continent’s growing middle class.

That burgeoning bourgeoisie is Africa’s lead variable, and Herlihy ballparks its current mass at 300 million people, each earning between $2,000 and $5,000 yearly — not always enough to keep a router in the living room lit, but certainly enough to pay off a BlackBerry bill. The service they enjoy, smoother than its American equivalent, runs off towers that are newer and more adaptable to data transfers, which is rendering Africa’s telecom transition — from a continent of voice phones to one of pocket PCs — more scalable than expected. 

"It’s just happening faster and faster than anybody could have imagined," Herlihy says.

The National Broadband Map is a tool to search, analyze and map broadband availability across the United States. Created and maintained by the NTIA, in collaboration with the FCC, and in partnership with 50 states, five territories and the District of Columbia

U.S. Broadband Map Shows an Unconnected Nation
Source: ReadWriteWeb

The National Telecommunications and Information Administration and theFederal Communications Commission have released a map of the broadband connections across the United States.
The most surprising thing in looking at the map? The reality that much of the country is not connected to broadband at all. But that was rather the point. The NTIA gives grants to projects in every state to increase the reach of broadband.
Areas of intense connection include the Eastern Seaboard, the Pacific Northwest, the Bay Area, the Chicago area and the Southland. The overwhelming majority of the Mountain West and Southwest, as well as inland Northwest and California are a broadband desert.

U.S. Broadband Map Shows an Unconnected Nation

Source: ReadWriteWeb

The National Telecommunications and Information Administration and theFederal Communications Commission have released a map of the broadband connections across the United States.

The most surprising thing in looking at the map? The reality that much of the country is not connected to broadband at all. But that was rather the point. The NTIA gives grants to projects in every state to increase the reach of broadband.

Areas of intense connection include the Eastern Seaboard, the Pacific Northwest, the Bay Area, the Chicago area and the Southland. The overwhelming majority of the Mountain West and Southwest, as well as inland Northwest and California are a broadband desert.

President Obama Details Plan to Win the Future through Expanded Wireless Access

Initiative expands wireless coverage to 98% of Americans, reduces deficit by nearly $10 billion, invests in nationwide public safety network

WASHINGTON—President Barack Obama will today detail his plan to win the future by catalyzing the buildout of high-speed wireless services that will enable businesses to grow faster, students to learn more, and public safety officials to access state-of-the-art, secure, nationwide, and interoperable mobile communications.

In his State of the Union address, President Obama called for a National Wireless Initiative to make available high-speed wireless services to at least 98 percent of Americans. The Wireless Innovation and Infrastructure Initiative laid out today will make it possible for businesses to achieve that goal, while freeing up spectrum through incentive auctions, spurring innovation, and creating a nationwide, interoperable wireless network for public safety.  It will also reduce the national deficit by approximately $10 billion.

(Read more at ww.whitehouse.gov)

Ruckus Smart Antennas May Be Key to Nationwide Wi-Fi | Epicenter | Wired.com
Traditional Wi-Fi routers use omnidirectional antennas, such as the little sticks on the back of Netgear and Linksys routers, which spill out signals equally in all directions. Ruckus’ routers have 19 separate antennas, arranged in a circle on the motherboard, which constantly triangulate the receiver’s location. The router then sends out signals on the antennas that have the best path to a given laptop.  

Ruckus Smart Antennas May Be Key to Nationwide Wi-Fi | Epicenter | Wired.com

Traditional Wi-Fi routers use omnidirectional antennas, such as the little sticks on the back of Netgear and Linksys routers, which spill out signals equally in all directions. Ruckus’ routers have 19 separate antennas, arranged in a circle on the motherboard, which constantly triangulate the receiver’s location. The router then sends out signals on the antennas that have the best path to a given laptop.  

250,000 Sensors to Fight Internet Traffic Jams
RIPE NCC, the regional Internet registry for Europe, the Middle East and some parts of Central Asia is planning to install up to 250,000 sensors that can measure Internet speeds and help engineers to predict and diagnose online traffic jams. Instead of building small, separate, private infrastructures to measure online traffic, RIPE proposes to build a common infrastructure with sensors that could regular send ping and traceroute requests to measure the state of local connections to a group of central servers. RIPE hopes to install the first 10,000 sensors by the end of next year.

250,000 Sensors to Fight Internet Traffic Jams

RIPE NCC, the regional Internet registry for Europe, the Middle East and some parts of Central Asia is planning to install up to 250,000 sensors that can measure Internet speeds and help engineers to predict and diagnose online traffic jams. Instead of building small, separate, private infrastructures to measure online traffic, RIPE proposes to build a common infrastructure with sensors that could regular send ping and traceroute requests to measure the state of local connections to a group of central servers. RIPE hopes to install the first 10,000 sensors by the end of next year.

Mount Everest now ‘wired’ for Internet, ready for Starbucks — Engadget
TeliaSonera subsidiary Ncell has just completed installation of a 3G base station at 5,200 meters (17,000 feet) that will reach the 8,848-meter peak of Mount Everest. Mind you, we’ve already seen a cellphone call made from the world’s highest peak using a temporary base station in a Motorola publicity stunt. This time, however, it’s permanent and faster allowing climbers to surf the internet or make 3G video calls. Why would Ncell want to build a base station in such a sparsely populated area? Because it is there.  

Mount Everest now ‘wired’ for Internet, ready for Starbucks — Engadget

TeliaSonera subsidiary Ncell has just completed installation of a 3G base station at 5,200 meters (17,000 feet) that will reach the 8,848-meter peak of Mount Everest. Mind you, we’ve already seen a cellphone call made from the world’s highest peak using a temporary base station in a Motorola publicity stunt. This time, however, it’s permanent and faster allowing climbers to surf the internet or make 3G video calls. Why would Ncell want to build a base station in such a sparsely populated area? Because it is there.  

Verizon Goes Up & Down at 10 Gbps in Tests | GigaOM
Verizon said today it had conducted a successful trial of 10 gigabit per second connections on both the download side and on the upload side. The broadband provider has successfully tested 10 Gigabits per second down last December but was limited to 2.5 Gbps on the upload side, and we all know that symmetry is beautiful when we’re talking faces or broadband speeds. Plus, at 10 Gbps you can upload HD movies in seconds rather than minutes. But these speeds aren’t really about consumer applications today, but more for shifting the terabytes of data businesses are aiming to analyze in the near future and for medical imaging and other high-bandwidth needs. Believe it or not, at the enterprise level we are creating more data than we can analyze and send across current networks.

Verizon Goes Up & Down at 10 Gbps in Tests | GigaOM

Verizon said today it had conducted a successful trial of 10 gigabit per second connections on both the download side and on the upload side. The broadband provider has successfully tested 10 Gigabits per second down last December but was limited to 2.5 Gbps on the upload side, and we all know that symmetry is beautiful when we’re talking faces or broadband speeds. Plus, at 10 Gbps you can upload HD movies in seconds rather than minutes. But these speeds aren’t really about consumer applications today, but more for shifting the terabytes of data businesses are aiming to analyze in the near future and for medical imaging and other high-bandwidth needs. Believe it or not, at the enterprise level we are creating more data than we can analyze and send across current networks.

FCC’s Whitespace Ruling: The Real Wi-Fi Revolution Is About to Happen

A powerful whitespace system could transform, say, a university campus from a clutch of disparate Wi-fi hotspots into a campus-wide wireless signal field. But Genachowski’s bigger thinking may seem atypical to cynics used to line-toeing government officials: He notes “this will also be a platform for innovators and entrepreneurs. There is every chance of this leading to the development of one or more billion-dollar industries.”

What’s he talking about? Things like:

  • Wireless broadband cover for rural areas, whose farmsteads are far from local cable routes.
  • Super-powered smart electric grids.
  • Wireless-connected cars that can alert drivers to upcoming local road hazards or traffic jams.
  • Smart advertising hoardings that detect your smartphone walking by, and tailor ads for you.

Why Isn’t the Price of Broadband Obeying Moore’s Law?

Northwestern University researchers have discovered that broadband Internet prices have remained nearly stagnant since 2004, despite the explosive pace of adoption since then, from approximately 20 percent of U.S. households in 2004 to more than 65 percent today.

One of the authors of the study, Shane Greenstein, argues that the 2003 decision allowing the broadband industry to regulate itself has caused much of the stagnation.

Read original article

Using Light, Intel Confirms Data Will Be Sent Wayyy Faster in the Near Future
Intel announced a prototype technology today capable of moving data at 50 Gbps, comparable to sending an entire HD movie in one second - foreshadowing faster, longer data connections that could be revolutionary for consumers and data center users. The prototype represents an important advance in Intel’s research into silicon photonics - using lasers instead of electrons to send data - which the company has been working on for years. Intel hopes to scale up the technology until it reaches speeds close to a terabit per second - fast enough to transfer a copy of the entire contents of a typical laptop in one second, the company said. 

Using Light, Intel Confirms Data Will Be Sent Wayyy Faster in the Near Future

Intel announced a prototype technology today capable of moving data at 50 Gbps, comparable to sending an entire HD movie in one second - foreshadowing faster, longer data connections that could be revolutionary for consumers and data center users. The prototype represents an important advance in Intel’s research into silicon photonics - using lasers instead of electrons to send data - which the company has been working on for years. Intel hopes to scale up the technology until it reaches speeds close to a terabit per second - fast enough to transfer a copy of the entire contents of a typical laptop in one second, the company said. 

techspotlight:

Millions of broadband users are being sold short by providers that are delivering speeds far below those advertised, according to research published today. Data released by Ofcom, the communications regulator, shows that the gap between the headline broadband speeds customers sign up for and the connection they actually receive has widened sharply in the last 12 months. The average actual speed is now just 46% of what was promised, down from 56% a year ago. (via Ofcom: Broadband ISPs are pulling a fast one | Business | The Guardian)

techspotlight:

Millions of broadband users are being sold short by providers that are delivering speeds far below those advertised, according to research published today. Data released by Ofcom, the communications regulator, shows that the gap between the headline broadband speeds customers sign up for and the connection they actually receive has widened sharply in the last 12 months. The average actual speed is now just 46% of what was promised, down from 56% a year ago. (via Ofcom: Broadband ISPs are pulling a fast one | Business | The Guardian)

The  Internet, 1,000 Times Faster - Global Challenges
Using a technique called “flow switching,” researchers from MIT are developing a model Internet that is significantly faster and more energy-efficient than today’s technologies.
With fiber-optic communication expanding throughout the world, our current Internet is quickly gaining speed. Still, downloading high-resolution pictures or streaming online videos can take time. Luckily for YouTube addicts, researchers from MIT are devising an Internet 100 to 1,000 times faster than today’s connection speeds. To transmit data, the Internet relies on an international system of optical fibers, which are more efficient than electrical signals. When optical signals reach routers, however, they are temporarily converted to electrical signals. Because routers organize large amounts of data from many different places, they must temporarily store information. They achieve this by using electrical signals, which are easier to manipulate than optical signals. In order to be retransmitted, the signals must be converted back to optical. Although currently necessary, this process wastes time and energy; the Internet thus becomes slow and environmentally unfriendly.

The Internet, 1,000 Times Faster - Global Challenges

Using a technique called “flow switching,” researchers from MIT are developing a model Internet that is significantly faster and more energy-efficient than today’s technologies.

With fiber-optic communication expanding throughout the world, our current Internet is quickly gaining speed. Still, downloading high-resolution pictures or streaming online videos can take time. Luckily for YouTube addicts, researchers from MIT are devising an Internet 100 to 1,000 times faster than today’s connection speeds. To transmit data, the Internet relies on an international system of optical fibers, which are more efficient than electrical signals. When optical signals reach routers, however, they are temporarily converted to electrical signals. Because routers organize large amounts of data from many different places, they must temporarily store information. They achieve this by using electrical signals, which are easier to manipulate than optical signals. In order to be retransmitted, the signals must be converted back to optical. Although currently necessary, this process wastes time and energy; the Internet thus becomes slow and environmentally unfriendly.