IBM Unleashes Advanced Software Solution for Smarter Buildings | GreenBiz.com
IBM formally introduces its Intelligent Building Management software today  — an advanced solution that’s being put to work at Tulane University’s  School of Architecture, The Cloisters of the Metropolitan Museum of Art  in New York, and the company’s 35-building facility in Minnesota.
The software is designed to be an analytics and automation powerhouse  that can help ramp up the environmental performance of any building,  even ones that are 100 years old or more.
The product is the latest in a steady stream of solutions that IBM has unleashed in recent months to make the management of buildings, the energy and resources they use, and the transportation and virtual networks that connect them more efficient, more effective and more intelligent.
The software and its applications, which are being detailed today in an IBM Smarter Buildings Forum in New York, also are the results of the company’s steadily increasing collaborative projects, partnerships and acquisitions — all of which are aimed at positioning IBM as a dominant player in a nascent field that brings together IT, the built environment, vehicles and energy.

IBM Unleashes Advanced Software Solution for Smarter Buildings | GreenBiz.com

IBM formally introduces its Intelligent Building Management software today — an advanced solution that’s being put to work at Tulane University’s School of Architecture, The Cloisters of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, and the company’s 35-building facility in Minnesota.

The software is designed to be an analytics and automation powerhouse that can help ramp up the environmental performance of any building, even ones that are 100 years old or more.

The product is the latest in a steady stream of solutions that IBM has unleashed in recent months to make the management of buildings, the energy and resources they use, and the transportation and virtual networks that connect them more efficient, more effective and more intelligent.

The software and its applications, which are being detailed today in an IBM Smarter Buildings Forum in New York, also are the results of the company’s steadily increasing collaborative projects, partnerships and acquisitions — all of which are aimed at positioning IBM as a dominant player in a nascent field that brings together IT, the built environment, vehicles and energy.

 IBM buys Tririga software in ‘smart building’ play
IBM already manages computers with software. Now it wants to manage buildings.

The computing giant today said it intends to acquire Las Vegas-based Tririga for an undisclosed amount, giving IBM software for managing a portfolio of buildings, including projects to improve building efficiency and lower carbon emissions.
IBM said it is part of its strategy to give corporations better ways to manage their facilities and equipment. Tririga’s applications will be part of IBM’s Tivoli division of management software.

"Having one view of building operations worldwide will be a powerful tool to help organizations control and optimize their second-largest corporate expense—property," said Florence Hudson, energy and environment executive at IBM said in a statement.

Tririga’s software is aimed at facility managers, giving them a way to monitor buildings to improve their utilization or to manage maintenance.
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 IBM buys Tririga software in ‘smart building’ play

IBM already manages computers with software. Now it wants to manage buildings.

The computing giant today said it intends to acquire Las Vegas-based Tririga for an undisclosed amount, giving IBM software for managing a portfolio of buildings, including projects to improve building efficiency and lower carbon emissions.


IBM said it is part of its strategy to give corporations better ways to manage their facilities and equipment. Tririga’s applications will be part of IBM’s Tivoli division of management software.

"Having one view of building operations worldwide will be a powerful tool to help organizations control and optimize their second-largest corporate expense—property," said Florence Hudson, energy and environment executive at IBM said in a statement.

Tririga’s software is aimed at facility managers, giving them a way to monitor buildings to improve their utilization or to manage maintenance.



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IBM Survey Shows Strengths, Gaps in U.S. Office Buildings
U.S. office buildings have failed to keep pace with the revolution in automation that pervades modern life, according to a new survey of American office workers by IBM. The wide-ranging survey indicates that inefficiencies built into office buildings are taking a toll in lost productivity and added costs. 

IBM Survey Shows Strengths, Gaps in U.S. Office Buildings

U.S. office buildings have failed to keep pace with the revolution in automation that pervades modern life, according to a new survey of American office workers by IBM. The wide-ranging survey indicates that inefficiencies built into office buildings are taking a toll in lost productivity and added costs. 

Johnson Controls Inc. | A Day in the Life of a Smart Grid
IBM and Johnson Controls have been collaborating on smarter buildings. Why is this front so important? Consider some of the following:
* The building sector is responsible for more electricity consumption than any other sector,  42%, and 15% of all Green House Gas (GHG) Emissions.
* In the U.S., buildings represent 72% of all energy usage and 39% of Green House Gas (GHG) Emissions (pdf). Yet,  up to 50% of that electricity is wasted.
* In New York City, buildings account for 80% of NYC’s Carbon Emissions.
* By 2025, buildings will be the single largest energy consumers and  emitters of greenhouse gas on our planet.

Johnson Controls Inc. | A Day in the Life of a Smart Grid

IBM and Johnson Controls have been collaborating on smarter buildings. Why is this front so important? Consider some of the following:

IBM’s  Smarter Buildings push | Green Tech - CNET News
IBM is hoping to use technology to create greener, smarter buildings. Big Blue announced Monday that it will team up with partners and customers to venture into the next phase of its Smarter Planet initiative: Smarter Buildings. The goal is to help buildings, manufacturing plants, and other facilities consume less energy and water and make them easier to operate. Announced Monday, one of IBM’s new partnerships is with Johnson Controls, a manufacturer of products that optimize energy use in buildings. The two plan to combine Johnson’s energy-efficient technologies with IBM’s Tivoli software to offer customers a way to monitor and manage power usage, which IBM believes will cut costs. Specifically, building owners will be able to detect wasteful energy use, calculate greenhouse gas levels, and better manage the space in their buildings.

IBM’s Smarter Buildings push | Green Tech - CNET News

IBM is hoping to use technology to create greener, smarter buildings. Big Blue announced Monday that it will team up with partners and customers to venture into the next phase of its Smarter Planet initiative: Smarter Buildings. The goal is to help buildings, manufacturing plants, and other facilities consume less energy and water and make them easier to operate. Announced Monday, one of IBM’s new partnerships is with Johnson Controls, a manufacturer of products that optimize energy use in buildings. The two plan to combine Johnson’s energy-efficient technologies with IBM’s Tivoli software to offer customers a way to monitor and manage power usage, which IBM believes will cut costs. Specifically, building owners will be able to detect wasteful energy use, calculate greenhouse gas levels, and better manage the space in their buildings.

Microchip-equipped sensors can be designed to monitor and measure not only motion, but also temperature, chemical contamination or biological changes. The applications for sensor-based computing, experts say, include buildings that manage their own energy use, bridges that sense motion and metal fatigue to tell engineers they need repairs, cars that track traffic patterns and report potholes, and fruit and vegetable shipments that tell grocers when they ripen and begin to spoil.

Oncor Names Smart Meter Partners: IBM, Ecologic Analytics
Texas utility Oncor may have rolled out almost 250,000 smart meters to customers already, but it won’t be building out all that network infrastructure alone. On Wednesday morning, some of Oncor’s partners announced their participation in the smart meter installation (planned to reach 3.4 million by 2012), including computing giant IBM and software maker Ecologic Analytics.

Oncor Names Smart Meter Partners: IBM, Ecologic Analytics

Texas utility Oncor may have rolled out almost 250,000 smart meters to customers already, but it won’t be building out all that network infrastructure alone. On Wednesday morning, some of Oncor’s partners announced their participation in the smart meter installation (planned to reach 3.4 million by 2012), including computing giant IBM and software maker Ecologic Analytics.

Aquasar Supercomputer (via jgluckibm)

In an effort to achieve energy-aware computing, the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich (ETH), and IBM today announced plans to build a first-of-a-kind water-cooled supercomputer that will directly repurpose excess heat for the university buildings. The innovative system, dubbed Aquasar, is expected to decrease the carbon footprint of the system by up to 85% and estimated to save up to 30 tons of CO2 per year, compared to a similar system using today’s cooling technologies. See the press release here: http://www.ibm.com/press/us/en/pressr…

Smarter Fire Departments = Smarter Cities

On page 18 of the Fire Department of New York’s 2009 – 2010 Strategic Plan, we find the text quoted below that describes a stated goal of the famous city’s fire department.

Develop a comprehensive data analysis system that will improve the efficiencies and effectiveness of a Coordinated Building Inspection and Data Analysis System (CBIDAS).  This risk-based inspection and computerized building safety program is one of the most important management initiatives in the modern history of the FDNY.   It will enable the FDNY to concentrate its fire prevention resources on the buildings and neighborhoods facing the greatest risk of serious fires.

As announced earlier this year, the Fire Department of the City of New York (FDNY) and IBM will build a “smart” system for collecting and sharing data in real-time that can prevent fires and help protect firefighters and other first responders when a fire does occur.

FDNY’s new Coordinated Building Inspection and Data Analysis System (CBIDAS) will use technology found in business intelligence approaches to anticipate potential fire risks, analyze possible impacts, and improve processes such as collecting and disseminating data on building inspection, permits and violations that can reduce risks.

An important element of the project will be better communication, improved sharing of information and coordination of fire inspection and site/building structure information.  That sharing will take place both within the FDNY and between the FDNY and city agencies such as Department of Buildings, Department of City Planning, and Department of Environmental Protection, as well as contractors.

Learn more:  Fire Department of New York Selects IBM for Intelligent Fire Safety System