Solar thermal process produces cement with no carbon dioxide emissions | physorg.com
While the largest contributor to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions is the power industry, the second largest is the more often overlooked cement industry, which accounts for 5-6% of all anthropogenic CO2emissions. For every 10 kg of cement produced, the cement industry releases a full 9 kg of CO2. Since the world consumes about 3 trillion kg of cement annually, this sector has one of the highest potentials for CO2 emission reductions. But while processes are being explored to sequester the CO2 from cement production, so far no process can completely eliminate it.

Solar thermal process produces cement with no carbon dioxide emissions | physorg.com

While the largest contributor to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions is the power industry, the second largest is the more often overlooked cement industry, which accounts for 5-6% of all anthropogenic CO2emissions. For every 10 kg of cement produced, the cement industry releases a full 9 kg of CO2. Since the world consumes about 3 trillion kg of cement annually, this sector has one of the highest potentials for CO2 emission reductions. But while processes are being explored to sequester the CO2 from cement production, so far no process can completely eliminate it.

Making Cement The Way Coral Does It: Out Of Thin Air | Fast Company
Biomineralization expert Brent Constantz of Stanford University got  inspiration from the way corals build reefs to make a new type of cement  for buildings. The process of making this cement actually removes  carbon dioxide – a greenhouse gas, thought to cause global warming—from  the air. The company Constantz founded, called Calera,  has a demonstration plant on California’s Monterrey Bay that takes  waste CO2 gas from a local power plant and dissolves it into seawater to  form carbonate, which mixes with calcium in the seawater and creates a  solid. It’s how corals form their skeletons, and how Constantz creates  cement.

Making Cement The Way Coral Does It: Out Of Thin Air | Fast Company

Biomineralization expert Brent Constantz of Stanford University got inspiration from the way corals build reefs to make a new type of cement for buildings. The process of making this cement actually removes carbon dioxide – a greenhouse gas, thought to cause global warming—from the air. The company Constantz founded, called Calera, has a demonstration plant on California’s Monterrey Bay that takes waste CO2 gas from a local power plant and dissolves it into seawater to form carbonate, which mixes with calcium in the seawater and creates a solid. It’s how corals form their skeletons, and how Constantz creates cement.